Urban Tree Species Guide

South Carolina Urban Tree Species Guide
CHOOSING THE RIGHT TREE FOR THE RIGHT PLACE

A properly selected, correctly planted and well-maintained tree will provide a multitude of benefits for generations. An ill-chosen, incorrectly planted and/or neglected young tree, will die in only a few years, at best, and become a risk and a hazard at worst.

Stand in the shade of a tree when the temperature is in the 90s. Then listen to the sounds of leaves rustling and birds chirping and insects buzzing. Have you noticed how the air under the branches of a tree seems cleaner to breathe? Look up at the blue sky through the green leaves or needles gently rustling against the sky.

Plant a tree. It will bring great pleasure and health to you and others who pass by.

Consider Site Factors

Consider Tree Factors

Planting Guide

Recommended Large Tree Species

Recommended Medium Tree Species

Recommended Small Tree Species

Advisory Committee

Reference Materials


What To Consider When Selecting Trees...
Consider...Site Factors

What site factors influence optimum tree growth?

Soil - Physical soil factors, especially the degree of compaction, are commonly overlooked when selecting trees but likely have the greatest impact on tree survival, growth, and health. If the soil is very compact, select trees that tolerate low soil oxygen levels and be sure to loosen the soil around the planting hole. Soil pH - degree of acidity or alkalinity - is also important as it affects the availability of nutrients and the activity of soil microorganisms. Determine the soil pH of your site and choose a tree species that grows well in that range.

Moisture - Either too much or too little water will limit tree growth. Determine the depth of the water table, preferably during the cool wet season, by digging several holes two to three feet deep and waiting three to four hours. If no water appears in the holes, any tree can be planted. If water accumulated, select species that tolerate wet sites (that is, low soil oxygen). If the water is less than 18 inches below the surface, plant small or medium-sized trees, as the root systems of large trees will likely be too shallow to provide adequate support. (On excessively dry sites, certain maintenance approaches may be required.)

Light - Determine the number of hours of direct sun the planting site receives in summer, since different tree species require differing amounts of sunlight. Trees requiring full sun (like most large-maturing trees) need at least six hours of direct sun. Those suited to mostly shaded to partially sunny sites (like flowering dogwood) will adapt to three to six hours of direct sun.

Space - Be aware of above-ground conflicts such as overhead wires, buildings, signs, other trees, etc. that would restrict unobstructed tree growth. Select trees that will have a mature size or form that will fit within the space available. Underground space is critical for sufficient root system development and tree health. Root systems can be very extensive, spreading a distance two times the height of the tree or more. Yet, most of the roots will be in the top eight to ten inches of the soil. Once your planting location has been chosen, and before you dig the tree hole, call your local utility locator company to avoid breaking lines while digging. This is a free service and they will indicate if there are any utilities near or at your planting site.

Temperature (Hardiness Zone) - Trees can adapt to a wide range of environmental factors, but withstanding the lowest winter temperature for an area is critical. The continental US and Canada have been divided into 10 zones based on a 100F difference in average annual minimum temperature. Choose trees that are appropriate for your specific hardiness zone.

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Consider...Tree Factors

Will the trees fulfill your intended landscape objectives with minimal care?

Tree Size and Location - Will the space adequately accommodate the tree you would like to plant? Mature height, crown spread, trunk flare, and root space are all important factors to consider before planting. Know what the tree will look like as it nears maturity.

Crown Form - The shape of tree crowns varies with different species and varieties of trees. Select trees with specific crown forms to accomplish certain landscape objectives or to fit the available above-ground space.

Shade - Trees provide a greater cooling effect than man-made structures because not only are the sun rays blocked, but water is added to the air through transpiration. High, wide-crowned trees with deciduous leaves are the best providers of shade.

Maintenance and Health Issues - Some tree types are more "problem-free" than others. Determine if the tree being considered has messy fruit or particularly large leaves that must be cleaned up. Is branch structure such that it requires frequent pruning or leads to premature branch failure as is often the case with Bradford pear? Fast-growing trees like silver maple provide quick shade but typically have brittle wood that easily breaks in strong winds. Be aware of any insect or disease problems that will require frequent attention or lead to health problems and early tree death.

Aesthetics - Trees add beauty to the community landscape. With planning trees can be used to enhance the appearance of structures and grounds. For example, to give a site an appearance of greater depth, plant on a diagonal line outward from the front corners of the building. This is called framing. Trees planted behind the building and to the side will provide background. Trees can also add visual appeal to parks, parking lots, streets or patios.

Accents - A tree with color or some other showy feature can be used as an accent point in your landscaping picture. Don’t overdo accents. For visual accent, select a tree that contrasts with the characteristic landscape in one or more of the design elements - form, size, color, or texture. The more contrasts, the stronger will be the accent.

Wildlife - Consider tree species with berries or nuts that are attractive to songbirds.

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Planting Guide

Now that the right-tree-for-the-right-place has been chosen, it’s time to plant.

  1. Before digging,find the topmost root growing from the trunk of the tree. This is called the root flare area. Remove any soil above that point across the entire root ball. Measure from the topmost root to the base of the root ball to determine its height.

  2. Dig the planting hole roughly three times wider than the diameter of the root ball. Dig no deeper or slightly less deep than the height of the root ball. The hole should be bowl-shaped with the sides sloped. Save the soil.

  3. Place the tree in the hole so that the top of the ball (root flare) is even with the soil level or slightly higher. Don’t cultivate the bottom of the hole, it may cause the root ball to settle and the tree to be planted too deep. Remove any burlap, wire, twine or strapping.

  4. Back fill with the soil that was removed from the hole. Don’t amend the soil with compost, peat moss, other soil, or fertilizer.Tamp soil lightly but do not compact.

  5. Form a one-to-two-inch berm of soil around the edge of the planting hole to hold water. Fill the "saucer" with water once or twice.

  6. Mulch the root ball surface and planting area. Use three to four inches of organic material. Keep the mulch one or two inches away from the trunk.

  7. Keep the tree well watered for the first year. Water every day for 2 weeks and every other day for two months and then weekly until the tree is established.

Remember - watering frequency depends on many factors: rainfall, temperature, and soil type. When watering, use two gallons of water per inch of trunk diameter. Do not over water or saturate the soil.

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Large Trees >50’ Suitable for areas with more than 200 square feet of total planting area; in a planting strip at least 7’ wide; or place at least 6’ from pavement or wall.
Common/Scientific Name Height & Width Sun/
Shade
Insect & Disease Resistance Growth Rate Deciduous Evergreen Remarks
Beech, American
Fagus grandifolia
50-75’ h
40-80’ w
PS/FS L S D Native. Needs ample room above and below ground. Acid soil. Fruit attracts wildlife, no litter. Zones 4-9
Blackgum
Nyssa sylvatica
65-75’ h
25-35’ w
PS/FS H S D Native. Soil pH below 6 best, texture tolerant, drought tolerant, wet soil tolerant. Fruit attracts wildlife, some litter. Zones 4-9
Deodar Cedar
Cedrus deodara
40-60’ h
25-30’ w
PS/FS M F E India. Drought tolerant, pH adaptable. Needs room for wide lower branches. Protect from strong winds. Zones 7-8
Cryptomeria, Japanese
Cryptomeria japonica
50-60’ h
15-20’ w
FS L S E Japan. Prefers acid soil, texture adaptable. Drought tolerant, shelter from wind. Zones 6-8
Cypress, bald
Taxodium distichum
60-80’ h
25-35’ w
FS/PS M F D Native. Drought & wet tolerant. ’Knees’ form in wet areas. Tolerates compaction. Zones 4-11
Cypress, pond
Taxodium ascendens
50-60’ h
50-60’ w
PS/FS H F D Native. Soil adaptable below 7.5. Knobby ‘knees’ form in moist areas. Attracts wildlife. No litter. Zones 5-9
Dawn redwood
Metasequoia glyptostroboides
70-90’h
25-35’ w
FS/PS H F D China. Avoid high pH soils & salt. Good for urban & moist areas. Zones 5-8
Ginkgo
Ginkgo biloba
50-75’ h
50-60’ w
PS/FS H S D China. Soil texture, pH & drought tolerant once established. Fall color is bright yellow. Females have smelly fruit. Zones 4-8
Hickory, pignut
Carya glabra
50-65’ h
30-40’ w
PS/FS M M D Native. Soil texture adaptable. Drought tolerant. Nuts attract wildlife. Zones 4-9
Hickory, shagbark
Carya ovata
60-80’ h
25-35’ w
PS/FS H S D Native. Soil texture adaptable. Abundant nuts attract wildlife. Shaggy bark attractive. Zones 4-8
Katsura tree
Cercidiphyllum japonicum
40-60’ h
35-60’ w
PS/FS M F D China. Soil adaptable, even moisture. Drought tolerant once established. Numerous shallow roots. Use mulch. Zones 4-8
Loblolly bay
Gordonia lasianthus
50-60’ h
10-15’ w
S/PS H S E Native. Needs shade. Soil adaptable, moist. Showy white flowers. Shallow root system needs mulch & water during drought. Zones 7-9
Magnolia, Southern
Magnolia grandiflora
‘Claudia Wannamaker′
60-80’ h
30-40’ w
PS/FS M M E Native. Soil adaptable. Bark is thin, protect from mechanical injury. White showy blooms in spring & summer. Good cultivars. Zones 7-9
Maple, red
Acer rubrum
60-75 ’h
25-35’ w
PS/FS H F D Native. Prefers acidic soil, texture tolerant, wet tolerant. Bark is thin. Fruit attracts wildlife. Many cultivars. Zones 4-9
Maple, sugar
Acer saccharum
50-80’ h
35-50’ w
S/FS L M D Native. Soil adaptable. Use in cooler portions of state. Roots need ample space. Shallow roots benefit from mulch. Zones 4-8
Oak, laurel/darlington
Quercus laurifolia
60-70 ’h
50’ w
PS/FS H F SE Native. Soil adaptable. Roots will heave sidewalks. Acorns attract wildlife, creates some litter. Zones 6-10
Oak, live
Quercus virginiana
60-80’ h
60-120’ w
PS/FS H M E Native. Soil adaptable. Roots will eventually heave sidewalks. Good wind resistance. Some litter. Zones 8-10
Oak, shumard
Quercus shumardii
60-80’ h
40-50’ w
FS M F D Native. Soil texture adaptable, acidic. Urban tolerant. Acorns attract wildlife. Some litter. Zones 5-9
Oak, southern red
Quercus falcata
60-80’ h
60-70’ w
FS M M D Native. Acidic soil, all textures, urban tolerant. Fruit attracts wildlife, no significant litter. Zones 7-9
Oak, scarlet
Quercus coccinea
60-75’ h
45-60’ w
FS M M D Native. Acidic soil, all textures. Needs ample root space. Nuts attract wildlife. Some litter. Zones 5-8
Oak, swamp chestnut
Quercus michauxii
60-70’ h
30-50’ w
PS/FS M M D Native. Acidic soil, all textures, occasional wet. Leaf litter persistent, acorns for wildlife. Zones 6-9
Oak, white
Quercus alba
60-100’ h
60-80’ w
PS/FS H M D Native. Acidic soil, all textures. Protect roots from disturbances. Nuts attract wildlife. Some litter. Zones 3-9
Oak, willow
Quercus phellos
60-75’ h
40-60’ w
FS M F D Native. Acidic soil, all textures, occasional wet, drought, urban tolerant. Nuts attract wildlife. Some litter. Zones 5-9
Pine, loblolly
Pinus taeda
50-80’ h
30’ w
FS M F E Native. Soil texture adaptable, acidic. Thick bark- resistant to fire. Needle drop prolific. Pinecones attract wildlife. Zones 6-9
Pine, longleaf
Pinus palustris
60-80’ h
30-40’ w
FS M F E Native. Soil texture adaptable. Beautiful bark. Needle and cone drop prolific. Drought tolerant once established. Zones 7-10
Sassafras
Sassafras albidum
30-60’ h
25-40’ w
PS/FS M M D Native. Acidic soils, wet. Showy yellow bloom in spring. Good fall color. Blue fruit, attracts wildlife. Smaller mature size on coast. Zone 4-9
Sweetgum
Liquidambar styraciflua
75’ h
50’ w
PS/FS H M D Native. Soil pH of 7.5 or less. Surface roots. Fruit attract wildlife, significant litter. Cultivar ‘Rotundifolia’ fruitless. Zones 5-9
Sycamore, American
Platanus occidentalis
75-90’ h
60-70’ w
FS L F D Native. Soil pH and texture adaptable. Prefers moist soil. Roots may heave sidewalks. Showy bark. Zones 4-9
Tulip poplar
Liriodendron tulipifera
80-120’ h
25-40’ w
FS H F D Native. Acidic soil, occasional wet. Avoid drought & salt. Showy greenish-yellow blooms in spring. Some leaf drop in high heat. Zones 4-9
Zelkova, Japanese
Zelkova serrata
50-90’ h
50-75’ w
FS H M D Japan. Soil adaptable. Drought & urban tolerant once established. Cultivar ‘Green Vase’ elm-like. Zones 5-8

KEY
Sun/shade exposure: Growth rate: Pest resistance: Type:
FS = Full sun S = Slow (less than 1’ per year) H = High D = Deciduous
PS = Part sun M = Medium (1-2’ per year) M = Medium E = Evergreen
S = Shade F = Fast (more than 2’ per year) L = Low SE = Semi Evergreen

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Medium Trees 25’ - 50’ Suitable for spaces with 100 to 200 sf of total planting space; in a planting strip at least 4-7 feet wide; or place at least 4’ from pavement or wall.
Common Name/Scientific Name Height & Width Sun/
Shade
Insect & Disease Resistance Growth Rate Deciduous Evergreen Remarks
Birch, river
Betula nigra ‘Heritage
40-50’ h
40-50’w
PS/FS M F D Native. Acidic soil. Drought sensitive in confined spaces. Roots need room. Cultivars available. Zones 3B-9
Crapemyrtle
Lagerstroemia indica
15-30’ h
15-25’ w
FS H M D China. Soil adaptable, urban tolerant, drought tolerant once established. Showy summer blooms. Zones 7-9
Crapemyrtle, Japanese
Lagerstroemia fauriei
35-50 ’h
25-35’ w
FS H M D Japan. Soil adaptable. Urban tolerant. White showy flowers. Beautiful bark. May be resistant to powdery mildew. Zones 6-9
Dogwood, flowering
Cornus florida
20-30’ h
20’ w
PS M M D Native. Part shade. Drought sensitive, low salt tolerance, needs good drainage. White showy flowers. Horizontal branching pattern. Zones 5-9
Elm, lacebark
Ulmus parvifolia ‘Drake’
40-50’ h
35-50’ w
FS H F D Asia. Soil adaptable. Drought tolerant once established. Thin bark. Urban tolerant. Zones 5-9
Goldenraintree
Koelreuteria paniculata
30-40’ h
30-40’ w
FS/PS M M D China. Soil adaptable. Salt, drought, urban tolerant. Bright yellow flowers in spring. Zones 5-8
Holly, East Palatka
Ilex x attenuata
30-45’ h
10-15’ w
FS M M E Florida natural hybrid. Urban & drought tolerant once established. Red berries attract wildlife. Zones 7-9
Holly,American
Ilex opaca
40-50’ h
15-25’ w
FS M S E Native. Salt and drought tolerant once established. Red berries attract birds, no litter. Zones 5-9
Holly, Nellie R. Stevens
Ilex x
20-30’ h
10-15’ w
FS H M E Hybrid. Soil texture tolerant. Needs male and female plants for berries. Drought tolerant. Showy red berries & deep green leaves. Zones 6-9
Holly, Savannah
Ilex x attenuata
30-45’ h
6-10’ w
FS M M E Hybrid. Acidic soil, urban tolerant. Red berries attract birds, no litter. Zones 6-9
Holly, weeping yaupon
Ilex vomitoria
20-30’ h
6-12’ w
FS M M E Native. Soil & pH adaptable. Thin bark. Flowers attract bees. Zones 7-10
Hophornbeam, American
Ostrya virginiana
30-40’ h
25-35’ w
PS/FS M S D Native. All soils except wet. Salt sensitive, drought & urban tolerant. Small nutlets attract wildlife. Zones 3B-9
Hornbeam, American
Carpinus caroliniana
20-40’ h
20-30’ w
PS M S D Native. Soil adaptable, occasionally wet, salt sensitive. Good climbing tree due to strong wood and low branches. Zones 3B-9
Hornbeam, European
Carpinus betulus
30-40’ h
15-20’ w
PS M S D Europe. Soil adaptable. Urban tolerant. Fruit attracts birds, no litter problem. Good screen. Zones 5-7
Loquat
Eriobotrya japonica
20-30’ h
30-35’ w
PS/FS M M E China. Southern range only. Texture tolerant. Well drained soil, afternoon shade. Orange or yellow fruit attracts wildlife, litter. Zones 8-10
Magnolia, sweetbay
Magnolia virginiana
40-50’ h
15-25’ w
PS M M D Native. Acidic soil. Tolerates wetlands. Flood & drought tolerant. Showy, white, fragrant flowers. Zones 5-9
Magnolia, Southern
Magnolia grandiflora
‘Bracken’s Brown Beauty’
30-50’h
15-30’w
FS H M E Native. Soil adaptable. White showy blooms in summer & early fall. Smaller leaves than species. Zones 6-9
Maple, hedge
Acer campestre
30-35’ h
30-35’ w
PS/FS H S D Europe. Soil adaptable, no compacted soil. Drought tolerant in part shade. Urban tolerant. Good screen plant. Good fall color. Zones 5-8
Maple, trident
Acer buergerianum
30-40’ h
25’w
PS/FS H M D China. Acidic, well drained soil. Urban, salt & wind tolerant. Attractive bark. Zones 5-8
Oak, Chinese evergreen
Quercus myrsinifolia
20-40’ h
20-30’ w
FS H S E China. Soil adaptable, all textures. Bark smooth, gray, beech-like. New foliage emerges purple-bronze color. Zones 7-9
Oak, overcup
Quercus lyrata
35-50’ h
35-50’ w
FS H M D Native. Soil adaptable, wet & drought tolerant once established. Urban tolerant. Acorns attract wildlife, significant litter. Zones 5-9
Palm, cabbage
Sabal palmetto
40-50’h
10-12’ w
PS/FS H S E Native. Soil tolerant, frond and fruit litter messy. Needs irrigation until established as all cut roots die back. Southern region only. Zones 8B-11
Palm, windmill
Trachycarpus fortunei
20-40’ h
6-10’ w
PS/FS M S E China. Soil texture adaptable. Drought tolerant once established. Protect from wind.Southern range of state only. Zones 8A-10B
Persian parrotia
Parrotia persica
20-40’ h
20-40’ w
PS/FS H S D Iran. Soil adaptable, not wet. Drought tolerant once established. Attractive bark, thin bark. Urban tolerant. Zones 5-8
Pistache, Chinese
Pistacia chinensis
25-35’ h
25-35’ w
FS/PS H M D China. Soil texture, pH, drought, urban tolerant. Fruit causes some litter. Zones 6-9
Redbud, eastern
Cercis canadensis
20-30’ h
15-30’ w
PS M F D Native. Light, rich, moist soil, texture adaptable. Showy purple blooms in spring. Cultivar ‘Texas White’ good. Short lived. Zones 4-9
Redcedar, eastern
Juniperus virginiana
40-50’ h
8-25’ w
FS H F E Native. Soil pH and texture tolerant. Blue fruit attracts wildlife. Good wind break, urban tolerant. Zones 3-9
Silverbell, Carolina
Halesia carolina
20-40’ h
15-30’ w
PS/FS H M D Native. Acidic soil. Drought sensitive in full sun, roots need room. Showy white blooms in spring. Zones 5-8
Snowbell, Japanese
Styrax japonicus
20-30’ h
15-25’ w
PS/FS H M D Japan. Acidic loamy soil. Afternoon shade, protect from wind. Attractive exfoliating bark. White showy blooms in spring. Zones 6-8
Stewartia, tall
Stewartia monadelpha
25-35’ h
15-25’ w
PS/FS H S D Japan. Acidic soils. Thin bark, attractive bark. White, camellia-like blooms in summer. Part shade best in 8B. Zones 6-8
Yellowwood, American
Cladastris kentukea
30-50’ h
40-50’ w
PS/FS H M D Native. Needs pruning while young. White fragrant blooms. Tolerates urban conditions. Zones 4-8

KEY
Sun/shade exposure: Growth rate: Pest resistance: Type:
FS = Full sun S = Slow (less than 1’ per year) H = High D = Deciduous
PS = Part sun M = Medium (1-2’ per year) M = Medium E = Evergreen
S = Shade F = Fast (more than 2’ per year) L = Low SE = Semi Evergreen

Contents


Small Trees < 25’ Useful under utility lines; areas with < 100 sf of total planting area; a planting strip with a width of at least 4’; or planted at least 2’ from pavement or wall.
Common Name/Scientific Name Height & Width Sun/
Shade
Insect & Disease Resistance Growth Rate Deciduous Evergreen Remarks
Buckeye, red
Aesculus pavia
15-20’ h
15-25’ w
S/FS M S D Native. Soil adaptable. Nice bark, showy blooms, seeds poisonous. Fruits attract wildlife. Litter. Zones 4-8
Chastetree
Vitex agnus-castus
10-15’ h
15-20’ w
PS/FS M F D Europe. Soil & pH adaptable. Showy lavender blooms. Zones 7-8
Chastetree, cutleaf
Vitex negundo-‘Heterophylla’
10-15’ h
10-15’ w
PS/FS M F D Africa. Soil & pH adaptable. Avoid wet soil. Showy lavender blooms attract bees. Zones 6-8
Cherry, Okame
Prunus x incamp ‘Okame’
15-25’ h
20’ w
PS/FS M M D Hybrid. Soil texture and pH adaptable. Roots need room. Pink showy blooms. Fruit attracts birds. Zones 7-9
Dogwood, Japanese
Cornus officinalis
20’ h
25’ w
PS/FS M S D Japan. Soil adaptable, salt sensitive. Showy blooms in spring, fruits in fall. Zones 5-8
Dogwood,kousa
Cornus kousa
15-20’ h
15-20’ w
PS/FS M S D Japan. Soil adaptable. Part shade, needs water. Roots need room. Showy white blooms in spring. Fruit attracts birds. Zones 5-8
Dogwood, pagoda
Cornus alternifolia
15-20’ h
15-20’ w
PS/FS M S D Native. Part shade. Soil adaptable, mulch needed. Creamy white blooms in spring. Fruit attracts birds. Zones 3-7
Fringetree
Chionanthus virginicus
12-15’ h
10-15’ w
PS/FS M S D Native. Acidic soil. Thin bark easily damaged. Urban tolerant. Showy white blooms in spring. Fruit attracts birds. Zones 4-9
Fringetree, Chinese
Chionanthus retusus
20’ h
10-15’ w
PS/FS H S D China. Acidic soil, occasionally wet. Shelter from wind. White showy blooms in spring. Fruit attracts wildlife. Zones 6-8
Holly, Foster’s
Ilex x attenuata ‘Fosteri’
15-25’ h
8-12’ w
PS/FS M S E Hybrid. Acidic soil, occasionally wet. Drought tolerant. Red berries attract birds, no litter. Zones 6-9
Holly, yaupon
Ilex vomitoria
15-20’ h
15-20’ w
S/FS M M E Native. Soil & pH greatly adaptable. Urban tolerant. Thin bark. Red berries attract wildlife. Zones 7-10
Maple, amur
Acer ginnala
15-20’ h
15-20’ w
PS/FS H M D Japan. Soil adaptable. Drought tolerant once established. Showy white to yellow blooms in spring. Bright red fruit, some litter. Zones 3-8
Magnolia, star
Magnolia stellata
15-20’ h
10-15’ w
PS/FS M S D Japan. Acidic rich soil, all textures. Not drought tolerant.White or pink showy blooms in spring. Zones 4-8
Magnolia, Southern
Magnolia grandiflora
‘Little Gem’
20-25’ h
10-15’w
PS/FS M M E Native. Soil adaptable. Bark is thin, protect from mechanical injury. White showy blooms in summer and early fall. Zones 7-9
Palm, pindo
Butia capitata
15-25’ h
10-15’w
PS/FS H S E Brazil. Soil adaptable. Drought tolerant. Showy orange or yellow fruit attracts wildlife, significant litter. Southern range only. Zones 8B-11.
Redbud, Chinese
Cercis chinensis
10-15’ h
6-10’ w
PS/FS M F D China. Light, rich, moist soil. Showy purple blooms in spring. Zones 6-9
Waxmyrtle
Myrica cerifera
15-20’ h
20-25’ w
PS/FS M F E Native. Soil & pH adaptable, urban tolerant. Blue berries attract wildlife. Zones 8-11

KEY
Sun/shade exposure: Growth rate: Pest resistance: Type:
FS = Full sun S = Slow (less than 1’ per year) H = High D = Deciduous
PS = Part sun M = Medium (1-2’ per year) M = Medium E = Evergreen
S = Shade F = Fast (more than 2’ per year) L = Low SE = Semi Evergreen

Contents


Special thanks to the Advisory Committee:


Reference Materials

Manual of Woody Landscape Plants: Their Identification, Ornamental Characteristics, Culture, Propagation and Uses by Michael A. Dirr

Trees for Urban and Suburban Landscapes by Edward F. Gilman

Landscape Design for Energy Efficiency - Clemson University publication EC 706

Xeriscape: Landscape Water Conservation in the Southeast - Clemson University publication EC 672

The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Trees-Eastern Region by Elbert L. Little

Principles and Practice of Planting Trees and Shrubs by Gary W. Watson and E.B. Himelick


For additional copies contact Clemson University’s Sandhill Research and Education Center, Columbia SC or the SC Forestry Commission.

Funded though an Urban and Community Forestry grant from the SC Forestry Commission.

General editor: Ellen A.V. Strother
Contributing authors: Donald L. Ham and Liz Gilland

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Forest Management/ Urban Forestry/ Reference Resources / Urban Foresters