Urban Forestry

Protecting Trees During Construction

Protect Your Trees

The decision to protect and preserve trees on a construction site is an important one.

Many sites are chosen for residential or business use simply because the site contains a beautiful shade tree or offers a wooded environment. Often the very trees which are highly valued for their contribution to the aesthetic appeal of a site are inadequately protected or cared for during construction.

A few careful and well planned steps may make the difference between a post-construction disappointment and a proud and satisfied new owner.

Develop a Tree Construction Plan

Follow Tree Protection Guidelines

Tree Wounds


Develop a Tree Construction Plan

The first step in a tree protection plan is to determine which trees can and should be saved. The following questions should be answered:

Large trees within 10 feet of buildings and drives may be damaged and later become hazardous. Plan to build a safe distance away from large trees, or remove them before construction.

Some trees in poor condition should not be saved. It may be safer and cheaper to remove old slow growing trees and those with extensive rot or diseased woody tissue before construction begins.

Keep trees that are well-located, vigorous, and have desirable characteristics; require the minimum protection to save them. Remove trees that are obviously located in the immediate construction area and will be damaged by soil compaction, cutting of roots, or grade changes.

Top of Page


Follow Tree Protection Guidelines

Follow these guidelines to protect trees during construction:

Dripline
Barricades that extend beyond the dripline are a good way to protect trees during construction.

Top of Page


Bad Tree

Tree Wounds

If trees are wounded or stressed during construction, they are more susceptible to insect and disease attack. Any wounds to the bark should be cleaned to sound wood by removing loose bark and wood, leaving a smooth edge around the wound. no application of a wound dressing is necessary.

Top of Page

For more information contact your Urban Forester


Publications/ Urban Forestry