1999 Annual Report
South Carolina Forestry Commission
July 1, 1998 - June 30, 1999

The South Carolina Forestry Commission prohibits discrimination in all programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation, or marital or family status.

The Forestry Commission is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, contact the Human Resources Director, SC Forestry Commission, P.O. Box 21707, Columbia, SC 29221, or call (803)896-8879.


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STATE COMMISSION OF FORESTRY

Members of the Commission

G. Edward Muckenfuss, Chairman, Summerville

George E. Callaway, Vice Chairman, Manning

Joel R. Thrift, Westminster

Lawrence J. Bloomer, Easley

Sara Lee Simons, Florence

David B. Smith, Conway

Mitchell S. Scott, Allendale

J. Kenneth Hill, Fort Mill

Dr. Constantine Curris, Clemson University, Clemson

Boris Hurlbutt, Chairman Emeritus, Walterboro

Administration

J. Hugh Ryan, State Forester and Secretary to the Commission

Wray E. Freeman, Deputy State Forester

Dean Carson, Technical Assistant to the State Forester

Judy J. Weston, Executive Assistant to the State Forester

Tim Adams, Division Director, Field Operations Support

Joe M. Richbourg, Division Director, Administration

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MISSION

The mission of the Forestry Commission is to protect, promote, enhance, and nurture the forest lands of South Carolina in a manner consistent with achieving the greatest good for its citizens.

The Commission will utilize Total Quality Management concepts in meeting its responsibilities.

Responsibilities extend to all forest lands, both rural and urban, and to all associated forest values and amenities including, but not limited to, timber, wildlife, water quality, air quality, soil protection, recreation, and aesthetics.

The Forestry Commission shall have general and specific responsibilities for the promulgation and enforcement of laws and regulations related to protection of the forest and its associated values.

The Commission shall be responsible for promoting and developing the appropriate technologies to accomplish its objectives, and for the development and promulgation of Best Management Practice Guidelines for South Carolina’s forest land.

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FIELD OPERATIONS SUPPORT

The Field Operations Support Division provides operational and technical staff direction to the Forestry Commission field organization in each of the major program areas of forest management, nurseries and tree improvement, forest insects and diseases, forest fire protection, and environmental management. Additionally, it provides oversight to the equipment and communication needs of the agency including operations of the central shop.

FOREST MANAGEMENT

The Forest Management Section assists South Carolina citizens with management and development of the forest resources of the state. Programs include Woodland Management Assistance, Reforestation Assistance, Forestry Services, Forest Products Utilization and Marketing Assistance, Resource Conservation and Development, Urban Forestry, and Forest Inventory. These programs assist owners in growing more timber, aid industries in more efficient utilization of the timber resource, and foster conservation and multiple use of the forest resource.

There are 12.4 million acres of commercial forestland in South Carolina. According to the 1993 U.S. Forest Service Survey, 72% of this land is owned by farmers and miscellaneous private owners. Forest industry owns approximately 19% with 9% in public ownership.

The Forest Management programs are designed to assist the non-industrial private landowner with multiple use forest management.

The Forest Management Section also has oversight responsibilities for the management of Sand Hills, Cassatt, and Manchester State Forests. Technical assistance is also provided to other state agency lands upon request.

FOREST MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE

Professional foresters from the Forestry Commission provide forest management advice and assistance to landowners. The land is examined and a written forest management plan is prepared. Recommendations for management may include such silvicultural practices as forest protection, reforestation, harvesting, prescribed burning, wildlife habitat improvement, and recreation. This year, 3,182 management plans were prepared for 171,150 acres. Where practical, the landowner is referred to consulting or industrial foresters to assist in carrying out management recommendations. This year 424 cases were referred to consulting foresters and 110 to industrial foresters.

COST SHARE PROGRAMS

Forest Renewal Program (FRP) - State

In 1982 the program was funded for the first time by a $100,000 state appropriation. This permitted an assessment of $400,000 from forest industry, and created a $500,000 Forest Renewal Fund. The funding was doubled effective July 1, 1996 increasing the program to $1,000,000.

Forest Incentives Program (FIP) - Federal

FIP funding for fiscal year 1998-99 was $496,734. South Carolina also received an additional $180,000 to assist landowners with reforestation necessary due to natural disasters.

Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) - Federal

The Agricultural Conservation Program was not continued with the 1996 Farm Bill. The figures below refer to completion of previously obligated funds.

Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) - Federal

The Program began with crop year 1986 and was renewed with the passage of the 1990 Farm Bill. Eighteen signups have been held. This year 7,208 acres were planted. The CRP program has been renewed again with the 1996 Farm Bill.

Statewide Accomplishments All Cost-Share Programs
Reforestation and Timber Stand Improvement

Program

No. of Landowners

Acres Planted

Natural Regeneration

TSI Acres

Cost-Share Payments

FRP

304

16,544

198

5,242

$1,613,136

FIP

357

7,566

0

1,850

$481,400

ACP

7

252

0

0

$8,798

CRP

188

7,208

0

0

$253,569

SIP

41

1,935

0

0

$110,114

Totals

897

33,505

198

7,092

$2,467,017

SEEDLING SURVIVAL

Survival checks were made on 10 percent of plantings using a row count or tenth acre plot method for determining survival. A weighted analysis involving all survival checks was used to determine the statewide survival of 78%.

Forest Management Assistance 1998 - 1999

	       Non Cost-Share	 Cost-Share	  Forest Stewardship	  
County	       Exams   Acres     Exams	Acres	Exams	Acres
========================================================================
Abbeville	40	2,965	47	2,088	1	  172
Aiken		50	2,935	63	2,071	4	  414
Allendale	 8	1,275	41	2,058	4	  461
Anderson	27	3,226	30	2,525	1	   83
Bamberg		 7	  358	57	2,377	2	  187
Barnwell	13	  513	56	2,268	7	  454
Beaufort	 9	  988	 8	  351	1	   43
Berkeley	24	1,140	36	1,037	4	  691
Calhoun		 5	  187	70	3,722	7	1,019
Upper Charleston 4	  565	 4	  229	1	  123
Lower Charleston11	  687	25	  962	4	  600
Cherokee	 5	  279	15	  304	0	    0
Chester		20	2,511	36	1,728	4	  937
Chesterfield	16	2,666	74	2,378	3	  194
Clarendon	26	  896	73	1,481	2	  234
Colleton	20	1,461  107	3,602	6	1,195
Darlington	24	1,887	36	1,782	2	  234
Dillon		16	1,345	38	1,459	9	  674
Dorchester	13	  445	68	1,699	3	  238
Edgefield	23	  875	77	4,221	3	  424
Fairfield	19	1,675	22	1,391	3	  486
Florence	20	  919  113	1,698	3	  691
Georgetown	 4	  250	47	1,629	0	    0
Greenville	23	  955	 4	  154	2	  237
Greenwood	31     10,096	23	  772	8	1,053
Hampton		35	2,960	68	2,663	3	  566
Horry		21	1,546  115	4,163	6	  578
Jasper		18	1,050	24	1,493	2	  269
Kershaw		11	  664	39	2,679	1	  136
Lancaster	19	1,058	 6	  182  13	2,209
Laurens		21	1,375	32	1,472	4	  220
Lee		 2	   32	31	  928	3	  663
Lexington	31	1,117	63	2,232	5	  291
McCormick	15	1,567	10	  471	1	  982
Marion		 7	  431	49	1,569	2	  344
Marlboro	24	1,803	24	1,054	1	  522
Newberry	36	1,677	69	2,422	1	   67
Oconee		18	  631	10	  205	7	  392
Orangeburg	12	  629	55	2,163	4	  305
Pickens		20	  946	11	  597	5	  364
Richland	32	1,780	20	  844	3	  117
Saluda		 5	  270	67	2,893	5	  419
Spartanburg	14	  310	18	1,018	9	  760
Sumter		 8	  258	33	1,432	2	   76
Union		16	1,322	13	  568	3	  446
Williamsburg	21	1,396  212	7,796	7	2,073
York		 6	  229	18	  986	4	  526
==============================================================================
State Totals	850	64,254	2,157	83,817	175	23,079

FOREST SERVICES

Through this program the Commission provides assistance to landowners and other state agency lands with afforestation, reforestation, and maximization of production from their woodlands. The landowner is charged the cost of all services performed.

These services were available to landowners during the year:

Firebreak Plowing - performed by Forestry Commission employees using agency equipment for $75 for the 1st hour and $50 for each additional hour.

Prescribed Burning - performed by Forestry Commission employees using agency equipment for $12 per acre for the 1st 50 acres, $10 per acre for the 2nd 50 acres and $8 per acre for all over 100 acres. Firebreak plowing costs are not included. Minimum fee $100.00.

Prescribed Burning Standby - an agency tractor and employee on standby at burning site while landowner performed burning under an approved plan for $45 for the 1st hour and $20 for each additional hour. Minimum fee $100.00.

Equipment Rental Program - agency owned tree planters, bedding plows and drum choppers made available to private landowners at rates from $4 to $15 per acre.

Timber Marking - performed by Forestry Commission employees at the rate of $5 per thousand board feet and $2.00 per cord.

ServiceNumber of TractsUnits of
Measure
Receipts
Received FY 98-99
Firebreak Plowing7281,462 miles$135,110
Prescribed Burning15210,811 acres$114,961
Prescribed Burning Standby583,366 acres$9,585
Equipment Rental571,237 acres$8,211
Water Bar Construction18293 bars$6,350
Timber Marking175,375 cords
1,306,506 bd. ft.
$17,768
Total Dollars1,030 $290,995


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URBAN FORESTRY

Urban forestry seeks to improve the quality of life in populated areas by providing direct technical assistance to communities and by working through partnerships with other organizations to protect and improve the management of urban tree resources. Clean air, clean water, improved aesthetics, increased property value, noise buffering, energy conservation, and public safety are some of the products of these endeavors.

Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program

The Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program is a national program funded by Congress through the U. S. Forest Service. South Carolina received $150,700 in base funding to provide technical assistance and training. Pass-through grants in the amount of $292,149 were provided to county and local governments, non-profit organizations, and educational institutions to develop long-lasting urban forestry programs in their communities.

Partnership Development and Educational Programs

Through the technical assistance and grant funds, the urban forestry program strives to develop partnerships with a variety of organizations and units of local government. Often these partnerships result in educational programs about the benefits and importance of urban forest resources. During FY99, the Forestry Commission developed partnerships with 216 organizations and presented 74 educational sessions to 3,274 participants.

Technical Assistance

Three full-time urban foresters provide technical assistance on a regional basis for the Piedmont, Pee Dee and Coastal regions of the state. Other Commission foresters provide urban forestry assistance in their respective areas on a time available basis. A full-time grants administrator works in the Columbia office along with the Urban Forestry Coordinator for statewide program management.

 

 

Types of Technical Assistance

Non-Grant Through Forestry Commission Technical Assistance

Grant Program Accomplishments by Grantees

Program Development/Expansion

103

NA

Project Management

37

NA

Urban Forest Cultural Practices

1,085

NA

Trees Inventoried

Street (661 miles)

NA

9,659

Park (451 acres)

NA

9,521

Total Trees Inventoried(#)

NA

19,180

Trees Planted

Saplings(<2" caliper)

NA

385

Street/Park Size(>2" caliper)

NA

512

Total Trees Planted (#)

NA

897

Trees Maintained(#)

NA

1,143

Local Ordinances Passed/Revised

NA

2

Demonstration Planting Projects

NA

26

Tree City USA

Sponsored by the National Arbor Day Foundation, Tree City USA is administered in South Carolina by the SC Forestry Commission. The program seeks to stimulate and promote the management of urban trees by recognizing towns and cities which meet the following criteria: (1) establishment of a city tree ordinance, (2) expenditure of at least two dollars per capita on tree care and planting, (3) a legally constituted tree board, and (4) observance of Arbor Day by a mayoral proclamation and official ceremony. South Carolina ranks 29th nationally with 27 towns recognized as Tree City USA.

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FOREST STEWARDSHIP

The Forest Stewardship Program is a cooperative effort between the USDA Forest Service, Forestry Commission, other natural resource agencies and organizations , forest industry, and private forest consultants in South Carolina to encourage the long-term stewardship of non-industrial private forest lands. Landowners are provided technical assistance by having a multiple-resource management plan developed for their property addressing their management objectives.

During FY 1998-99, 295 Stewardship Plans were written in South Carolina on 50,662 acres. The plans were written by the following cooperators: Forestry Commission: 175 plans; Forest Consultants: 89 plans; Forest Industry: 31 plans.

Stewardship Incentive Program

Once landowners have an approved Stewardship Management Plan, they may be eligible to participate in the Stewardship Incentive Program (SIP). This is a federal cost-share assistance program to provide financial incentives to private landowners to carry out some of the management practices outlined in their Stewardship Management Plan.

Congress did not allocate any Federal funding for SIP during FY 98-99, therefore South Carolina did not receive any new funds to allocate towards this cost-share program.

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FOREST INVENTORY AND MONITORING

The Forest Inventory and Monitoring program is a cooperative program with the US Forest Service to collect forest inventory and forest health data from a network of permanent sample plots. There are 3840 total forest inventory plots located in South Carolina. Each year one panel (20%) of the sample plots will be measured for growth projections, damage assessments, and land use classification. The Forestry Commission will also conduct product utilization surveys to estimate product uses in South Carolina. Data analysis and reporting for this program is furnished by the US Forest Service.

The Forest Health Monitoring section of the program consists of 122 total plots in South Carolina. 33% of these plots will be measured each year during the summer for health, soil chemistry, pollution indicators and related parameters. In addition, separate bio-indicator sample plots will be surveyed to monitor the level of ozone pollution.

Currently, three full-time inventory crews are stationed throughout the state. The program coordinator is stationed in Columbia. All crew members and the program supervisor are required to maintain a minimal accuracy average of 87% for all inventory plots. US Forest Service personnel conduct quality control and quality assurance checks to monitor accuracy of the field crews.

During FY99, field crews have collected data from 498 forest inventory plots. This represents 65% of the sample locations to be collected in the first panel. Data collection for the health monitoring plots is 80% complete and will be finished for the year by mid-August.

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MANCHESTER STATE FOREST

Manchester State Forest, located south of Wedgefield in Sumter County is currently comprised of approximately 23,745 acres. From 1939 to 1955, Manchester was leased by the State of South Carolina from the federal government and managed by the South Carolina Forestry Commission. The State received title to the property on June 28, 1955.

Receipts For Operating Budget:
ActivityReceipts
Timber Sales $367,376.04
Pinestraw Sales $ 14,312.38
Land Lease Payments $ 12,540.83
Wildlife Management Area Payments $ 23,424.45
Special Use Permits $ 11,421.95
Total$429,075.65

Note: 25% of all forest receipts paid to Sumter County - $107,268.91

Timber sales were concentrated on thinnings in overstocked stands and conversion of older slash pine stands to longleaf plantations.

Silvicultural Practices

Site preparation by burning and herbicide was completed on 625 acres. These areas included stands which were previously understocked and therefore clearcut. One hundred forty-eight acres of planted longleaf pine were treated with herbicide for release.

The following species and number of trees were planted:
Containerized Longleaf Pine255,000
Improved Coastal Loblolly Pine19,000
Total Trees Planted274,000

A total of 617 acres were prescribed burned for site preparation, wildlife habitat enhancement, hardwood control a and fuel reduction. Wet weather and smoke management concerns were the limiting factors in the completion of the proposed schedule of burning.

Forest Protection

Seventeen wildfires occurred burning less than 150 acres with minimal damage. Firebreaks were maintained on those areas that were either high risk or of high value. New firebreaks were established on the entire Oak Lea property.

Recreation/Education

Recreational use of the forest continues to escalate over previous years. Hunting, fishing, horseback riding, motorcycle/ATV riding, mountain biking, and use of the rifle/pistol range continue to be favorite activities. Recreational trails have been marked and brochures printed. A $7,500 matching grant was used to improve and enhance the motorcycle/ATV riding area.

Seven special-use permits were issued for organized events with approximately 3,000 participants.

Five (5) educational programs were conducted with the assistance of the forest staff and area personnel with approximately 81 individuals involved. Of this 81, five were visitors from Central American countries. Several training sessions were also held at Manchester for SCFC personnel; including law enforcement training and technician training.

Wildlife Management

Approximately 17,000 acres of the forest are presently included in the Wildlife Management Area Program through a cooperative agreement between the Department of Natural Resources (DNR), and the South Carolina Forestry Commission. DNR provided technical assistance with game food plot establishment monitoring deer herd dynamics, tracking various nongame and game species and, pond management. Law enforcement on the forest is provided through interagency cooperation with Department of Natural Resources.

Planting and maintenance was conducted on 344 acres of wildlife areas. Corn, sunflowers, sorghum, browntop millet, quail mix, wheat, rye, clover, vetch and bicolor were utilized to diversify the food supply. Several of the plantings were donated by the Department of Natural Resources and planted by Manchester and DNR personnel.

Colony sites of the red cockaded woodpecker continue to be monitored along with scouting for new cavity and start trees in cooperation with biologists from the neighboring Poinsett Gunnery Range (USAF).

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SAND HILLS STATE FOREST

Sand Hills State Forest (SHSF) covers approximately 46,000 acres with 45,000 acres in Chesterfield County and 1,000 acres in Darlington County. The forest was operated under a use agreement with the federal government from 1939 until 1991. In July of 1991, title to Sand Hills State Forest was transferred to the South Carolina Forestry Commission.

Receipts

Since 1967, Sand Hills has been totally self-supporting. The only appropriated funds coming to Sand Hills are earmarked for the development of the H. Cooper Black Memorial Field Trial and Recreation Area. Receipts For Operating Budget:
ActivityReceipts
Timber Sales $736,670.22
Pinestraw $ 125,800.00
Land Lease Payments $ 2,609.00
WMA Payments $ 15,616.30
Special Use Permits $ 8,401.00
Total$889,096.52

Note: 25% of all receipts are paid to Chesterfield and Darlington County School System. - (F.Y. 98/99 $222,274)

Silvicultural Practices

Site preparation for planting longleaf pine by disking and V-blading was completed on 695 acres. These areas were in slash pine that had stagnated.. Bareroot longleaf seedlings were planted on 989 acres on SHSF and containerized Longleaf seedlings were planted on 155 acres on Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge. Prescribed burning was done on 4,600 acres.

The following species and number of seedlings were planted:
Bareroot Longleaf Pine 560,000
Containerized Longleaf Pine 85,000
Total 645,000

This year Sand Hills started a pinestraw enhancement program. Under this program an individual from the general public can enter into a four-year agreement with the Forestry Commission to clear up land for pinestraw production. The individual agrees to eradicate 90% of all hardwoods on a tract of land using chemicals. In exchange that person may harvest all the pinestraw that falls during the 4 years of the agreement. After the agreement expires, the acreage becomes part of SHSF's quality straw production program. The straw from these areas is offered for sale on a lump sum sealed bid basis at three-year intervals. Currently there are nine individuals working on approximately 5,000 acres of land. The value of the pinestraw in the year 2005 will approach $1,000,000.

Forest Protection

No wildfires occurred on Sand Hills this year. SHSF boundary lines and the road system are maintained as firebreaks and as access in case of wildfire.

Recreation/Education

Recreational use of the Forest continues to show rapid increase. Hunting, fishing, horseback riding, motorcycle/ATV riding, mountain biking, hiking, and camping continue to be favorite activities.

A horse-riding trail from Sugarloaf Mountain to Cheraw State Park (26 miles) named the Pine Barrens Horse Trail is complete. The Pine Barrens Wagon Trail from Sugarloaf Mountain to Cheraw State Park (24 miles) is complete except for signs. The Cooper Black Horse Trail (21 miles) is complete and being used regularly.

The Headquarters Mountain Bike Trail has been extended from 6 miles to 9 miles. This trail was built with the help of local volunteers and Boy Scouts. People from as far away as Charlotte, NC and Columbia use the trail frequently.

At Sugarloaf Mountain, there are 7 primitive camping sites for people without horses and 8 primitive camping sites for people with horses. Sand Hills personnel booked 284 reservations for these sites this year. An estimated 3,000 people with 1,000 horses used the campsites and trails.

Designated use permit sales for trail use had a tremendous increase this year. Sales increased from 271 permits in 1998 to 505 in 1999. Receipts from designated trail use permits totaled $8,401.

Free use permits are issued for camping at Sugarloaf Mountain, raking pinestraw for personal use, and gathering firewood. Free use permits also increased this year. Last year, 217 free use permits were issued and this year, 329 were issued. Thirty-seven of the permits were for raking pinestraw for personal use, 9 for gathering firewood already on the ground, and the remainder were for camping.

In the Cooper Black Recreation area, there are 11 camping sites for RV campers. These sites have electrical hookups and water access. A dump station is complete. Also at Cooper Black is a clubhouse available for anyone to rent. A commercial kitchen has added to the usefulness of the clubhouse. A comfort station (restroom/shower facility) is complete. Approximately 120 acres have been converted to open grassed areas for retriever field trials.

Reservations for campsites and stalls are increasing. Approximately 129 reservations for campsites and stalls were booked. Receipts from campsite and stall use totaled $4,350.

Use of the Cooper Black Area is increasing. Twenty-three sporting dog field trials were held this year with approximately 3,000 people involved. Revenue from user fees totaled $4,200.

A much needed brochure of Cooper Black was designed and printed this year. The brochure lists the rules and regulations for Cooper Black and features a full map of the trails on the reverse side. The brochure is available on the Forestry Commission web site.

Sand Hills' personnel conducted 5 educational programs that involved approximately 200 people. One of the programs was a teacher recertification program conducted by Bowater. Sand Hills is an annual participant in this program.

Wildlife Management

Approximately 40,000 acres of the Forest is included in the Wildlife Management Area Program. This is a cooperative agreement between the S.C. Department of Natural Resources and the S.C. Forestry Commission. Department of Natural Resources personnel provide assistance with the game food plot establishment, monitoring deer herd dynamics, tracking various game and non-game species, and pond management. Law enforcement on the forest is provided through interagency cooperation. Sand Hills has a 57-acre public dove field. Thirty-five acres of this field were planted to annual crops with the remainder planted and maintained in bicolor lespedeza.

Seventy-nine acres (155 plots) were planted as wildlife food plots. These plots were planted in chufa, corn, sunflower, spring game mix, dove mix, dove proso, wild turkey mix, quail mix, sorghum, and bicolor. All plantings were fertilized and limed at the recommended rates. All manageable bicolor patches in compartments 14, 15, and 16 were bushhogged, fertilized, and limed.

A furbearer scent survey, fox squirrel survey, turkey survey, and a quail survey were conducted to track population trends.

Sixty-one established wood duck boxes were monitored, cleaned and repaired. Fifty new boxes will be added in the fall of 1999.

Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species Management

There were 41 documented Red Cockaded Woodpecker (RCW) nesting attempts on SHSF this year. A total of 72 fledglings were banded. This is a significant increase from the 55 that were banded last year. Two unbanded adult birds were discovered at Sand Hills. These two birds were captured, properly banded, and released.

Four artificial RCW recruitment sites were constructed on the forest this year. A fifth recruitment site is underway. In addition to the recruitment sites, eight artificial cavity boxes have been installed and approximately 10 more will follow. Several drilled cavities will be completed along with 5 drilled starts. All new cavity trees and start trees are currently being painted and tagged. The exact location of these trees will be documented by Global Positioning System(GPS).

Hardwood understory was drum chopped for habitat management within three RCW clusters. The three clusters sites are approximately 50 acres in size.

Research

A longleaf pine natural regeneration research project in conjunction with the U.S. Forest Service is still ongoing and has been in effect for 25 years.

A University of Georgia student pursuing a doctorate in biology initiated a research project to establish a baseline population of the Pine Barren Tree Frog and the Gopher Frog. The Pine Barrens Tree Frog project is part of the mitigation plan for two ponds built in the Cooper Black Area for retriever field trials.

A professor from the University of Georgia has set up a turkey litter/water quality survey on the forest. The study will last four years.

Our sludge research project is on going. A new four-year cycle was started this year. Turkey litter was added to the study site for comparison with sludge and commercial fertilizer applications and their effects on tree growth and soil chemistry.

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STATE LANDS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

The State Lands Forest Management Program was created to provide professional forest management assistance to South Carolina state agencies that own timberlands. During fiscal year 1998-99, three agencies requested assistance from the state lands coordinator. The agencies and facilities were as follows:

Department of Natural Resources

Treadwell Wildlife Management Area
Manor Wildlife Management Area
Webb Wildlife Center
James Ross Wildlife Management Area
Donnelley Wildlife Management Area
Palachucola Wildlife Management Area
Mason Wildlife Management Area
McBee Wildlife Management Area
McConnell's Wildlife Management Area
Segars ­ McKinnon Heritage Trust

S.C. Department of Corrections

Wateree Farm
McDougal Correctional Institute

S.C. Department of Transportation

Greenville Office

Timber Revenue

Six state-owned tracts were marked or cruised for timber sales and produced an estimated volume of 2.26 million board feet of sawtimber and 4,496 cords of pulpwood valued at $802,195.00.

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NURSERIES AND TREE IMPROVEMENT

The South Carolina Forestry Commission operates Taylor Forest Tree Nursery (bareroot) at Trenton and Creech Containerized Greenhouse at Wedgefield for the production of seedlings for South Carolina landowners.

This year 17,954,178 seedlings were grown. The target was close to 27,000,000 but a combination of extreme weather patters and storms early in the season destroyed nearly 9,000,000 seedlings. Demand for loblolly and longleaf was very high and we purchased 1,933,023 seedlings from various industries to help service as many customers as possible. A total of 1,694 orders were processed. North Carolina Division of Forestry received 672,000 seedlings grown for them using their seed and all other seedlings were planted in state. A total of 94,539,479 seedlings were planted on 158,301 acres in the state during the year.

The old Piedmont Nursery (now an education center), Coastal Nursery (now a seed orchard) and Tilghman Nursery (now Sumter Area Office) facilities continue to house White Pine, Virginia Pine and a hardwood genetics program. Spartanburg, Sumter and Walterboro Area Offices plus Taylor Nursery are used as seedling distribution centers.

CONTAINERIZED SEEDLINGS

Specialized needs exist for seedlings other than bareroot stock. To meet these needs, a greenhouse and outdoor benches are operated at Creech Greenhouse in Wedgefield. Containerized seedlings, rooted cuttings and progeny test materials are grown at the facility. The facility gives the Commission the capacity to grow a million plus containerized seedlings annually. The greenhouse production was 838,881 for fiscal year 1998-1999.

RESEARCH

The South Carolina Forestry Commission continues cooperative research projects with Clemson University, Auburn University and U.S. Forest Service. The Commission also maintains membership in the North Carolina State University Pine Tree Improvement Cooperative, the North Carolina State Hardwood Research Cooperative, and the Auburn University Southern Forest Nursery Management Cooperative.

FOREST TREE SEED COLLECTION PROGRAM

Each year the South Carolina Forestry Commission collects or purchases pinecones and other forest tree seed for seedling production. During the past year, Walnut, Yellow Poplar, Texas Loblolly and Longleaf Pine seed were purchased for future seedling production. Sawtooth Oak was collected from Savannah, GA. No longleaf collectionwere made due to the very poor crop.

TREE IMPROVEMENT

Niederhof Seed Orchard produced 3,744 bushels of second generation coastal loblolly pine and 770 bushels of second generation piedmont loblolly. The second generation coastal orchard has been rogued to twenty clones and the piedmont orchard to ten clones. Based on SCFC and North Carolina State University field tests these coastal trees produce 18% more volume/acre than unimproved and the piedmont trees produce almost 30% more volume/acre than unimproved. Both sources have demonstrated one half the rust infection of unimproved trees. This performance exceeded our expectations. Over 125 genetic field studies are being managed with five studies being measured this year. A total of 83 have been measured since 1988-89. Third cycle clones are being grafted each spring into a new breeding orchard at Niederhof Seed Orchard. Breeding will begin in another year or two. All new third cycle selections will be complete by 2003 and new third cycle orchards will be established at Niederhof.

State Nurseries Seedling Production By Species 1998-99

Bareroot Seedlings

Improved Coastal Loblolly Pine

7,192,000

Improved Piedmont Loblolly Pine

4,511,877

Improved Texas Loblolly

119,800

Longleaf Pine

3,751,500

Improved Virginia Pine

66,300

Improved White Pine (2-0)

75,050

Baldcypress

59,925

Red Cedar

79,075

Yellow Poplar

7,700

Improved Sweetgum

1,700

Improved Sycamore

30,500

Black Walnut

11,500

Attaway Lespedeza

1,172,100

Sawtooth Oak

37,070

Miscellaneous

-0-

Total

17,116,097

White Pine (1-0) Not For Sale

100,000

Containerized Seedlings

(Creech Greenhouse)

Improved Piedmont Loblolly Pine

-0-

Improved Coastal Loblolly Pine

-0-

Improved Virginia Pine

6,315

Improved Longleaf Pine

710,695

Leyland Cypress

87,044

Carolina Sapphire

6,732

Clemson Greenspire

5,238

Wiregrass

22,857

Total

838,881

Grand Total

17,954,978

Tree Seedling Distribution By Landowner Classification

Seedlings Planted in the State by Land Ownership:

Land Ownership

Percent of Total

Number of Trees Planted

1. Private Ownership

60

56,337,950

2. Christmas Tree Growers

<1

55,000

3. Forest Industry (Pulp & Paper)

27

25,741,386

4. Lumber

2

1,665,368

5. Forest Industry (Other Corp.)

8

7,857,900

6. Schools

<1

50,000

7. State Forest

1

934,000

8. Other State Land

<1

45,000

9. Other Government Land

<1

831,725

10. Federal Land

1

971,150

11. Associations/Clubs

<1

50,000

Total

100

94,539,479

Source of Seedlings Planted in the State:

Nurseries in South Carolina

South Carolina Forestry Commission (Includes Greenhouse)

17,954,978

Champion International

7,928,194

International Paper Company

34,333,950

Westvaco

14,886,328

Weyerhaeuser

11,005,000

Total

86,108,450

Nurseries Outside of South Carolina

Georgia Forestry Commission

1,203,150

International Paper (Lattay)

2,909,950

Union Camp

1,891,000

International Forest Company

2,404,500

Weyerhaeuser (North Carolina)

4,000

Kimberly Clark

18,429

L & R Orchards (Georgia)

182,000

Total

8,613,029

Total Seedlings and Acres Planted In South Carolina

1929-1999 by County

County

Seedlings Planted 1998-99

Grand Total Planted to Date 1929-99

Acres Planted

1929 - 6/30/99

Abbeville

429,255

13,062,739

21,771

Aiken

4,054,904

245,649,194

409,415

Allendale

720,980

12,861,498

21,435

Anderson

874,026

53,569,220

89,282

Bamberg

1,261,972

70,020,060

116,700

Barnwell

1,212,522

35,152,239

58,587

Beaufort

302,164

28,484,866

47,474

Berkeley

1,925,030

134,965,352

224,942

Calhoun

578,742

50,112,499

83,520

Charleston

1,123,951

54,670,785

91,1188

Cherokee

193,500

34,485,728

57,462

Chester

544,337

85,948,965

143,248

Chesterfield

1,994,472

149,936,980

249,8945

Clarendon

2,098,887

73,901,109

123,168

Colleton

2,959,544

142,470,844

237,451

Darlington

284,399

39,509,763

65,849

Dillon

697,381

34,951,702

58,252

Dorchester

1,767,298

89,670,268

149,450

Edgefield

1,004,684

89,815,003

149,692

Fairfield

1,925,475

117,852,438

196,421

Florence

996,936

37,389,309

47,289

Georgetown

3,327,517

152,495,384

254,159

Greenville

27,326

31,177,063

51,962

Greenwood

1,692,976

96,385,159

160,642

Hampton

4,053,378

118,336,076

197,227

Horry

1,863,398

82,091,926

136,820

Jasper

2,198,128

104,365,826

173,943

Kershaw

955,137

191,740,735

319,568

Lancaster

255,259

82,511,874

137,520

Laurens

1,398,154

105,617,526

176,029

Lee

414,204

37,434,000

62,390

Lexington

1,454,679

73,693,680

122,823

Marion

1,158,975

44,327,889

73,880

Marlboro

1,449,188

62,753,328

104,589

McCormick

47,299

54,756,813

91,261

Newberry

1,178,697

97,891,980

163,153

Oconee

357,363

39,679,613

66,133

Orangeburg

2,222,309

151,750,847

252,918

Pickens

256,402

30,069,576

50,116

Richland

1,598,101

71,614,452

119,357

Saluda

1,271,597

73,084,214

121,807

Spartanburg

202,086

63,802,691

106,338

Sumter

1,174,377

74,043,641

123,406

Union

655,862

79,037,385

131,729

Williamsburg

3,477,842

119,014,636

198,358

York

506,950

67,047,390

111,746

Multiple Counties

34,226,349

564,262,503

940,438

Total

94,541,378

4,264,629,171

7,107,696

SCFC Active Seed Orchards

Orchard TypeYear EstablishedAcres

Creech Seed Orchard

Genetic Diversity Archives (clone banks)

1977-83

25

Coastal Loblolly Pine 1.0 Rust Resistant

1971

5

Longleaf Pine 1.0

1971

12

Virginia Pine 1.0 (Creech)

1980

1

Virginia Pine 1.0 (Manchester SF)

1986

2

Sawtooth Oak 1.0 Seedling

1990

2

Total

47

Niederhof Seed Orchard

Coastal Loblolly Pine 2.0

1985-88

204

Piedmont Loblolly Pine 2.0

1985-88

118

Longleaf Pine 1.0

1988-90

30

Loblolly Pine Breeding Orchard 3.0

1997-

2

Longleaf Pine Seedling Seed Orchard

1998

8

"Gobbler" Sawtooth Oak Seedling S.O.

1998

1

Total

363

Coastal Seed Orchard

Sycamore 2.0

1992-95

4

Sweetgum 2.0

1992-95

6

Willow Oak Seedling Seed Orchard

1992-95

1

Swamp Chestnut Oak Seedling S.O.

1992-95

1

Green Ash Seedling Seed Orchard

1992-95

3

Red Maple Seedling Seed Orchard

1992-95

1

Southern Red Oak Seedling Seed Orchard

1992-95

2

White Oak Seedling Seed Orchard

1992-95

2

Total

20

Piedmont Seed Orchard

White Pine 1.5

1991-93

12

Virginia Pine 1.0

1993

3

Northern Red Oak Seedling Seed Orchard

1993-95

2

Total

Grand Total

17

447

Seedling Distribution 1927-1999

Year

Total State Nurseries

Total All Sources

Year

Total State Nurseries

Total All Sources

1928-29

142,000

142,000

1964-65

49,009,893

60,683,493

1929-30

148,000

148,000

1965-66

42,310,685

56,529,185

1930-31

986,000

986,000

1966-67

48,575,190

69,597,590

1931-32

976,000

976,000

1967-68

39,970,136

58,812,136

1932-33

996,000

996,000

1968-69

29,529,285

51,453,285

1933-34

1,031,000

1,031,000

1969-70

31,415,430

49,202,630

1934-35

7,529,000

7,529,000

1970-71

31,939,880

54,540,880

1935-36

23,000,000

23,000,000

1971-72

23,677,925

41,357,225

1936-37

22,000,000

22,000,000

1972-73

30,977,800

45,239,100

1937-38

11,192,000

11,192,000

1973-74

28,443,000

42,305,500

1938-39

10,854,000

10,854,000

1974-75

40,081,500

55,996,500

1939-40

12,244,000

12,244,000

1975-76

40,664,387

59,063,387

1940-41

21,165,423

21,165,423

1976-77

39,795,375

59,238,275

1941-42

10,275,037

10,275,037

1977-78

45,734,500

64,380,200

1942-43

4,742,010

4,742,010

1978-79

43,009,533

65,936,933

1943-44

5,662,608

5,662,608

1979-80

46,374,919

76,206,619

1944-45

1,962,600

1,962,600

1980-81

53,512,622

86,419,513

1945-46

6,402,255

6,402,255

1981-82

55,727,828

87,793,028

1946-47

1,962,600

1,962,600

1982-83

47,798,858

86,265,299

1947-48

11,356,990

11,356,990

1983-84

50,169,612

100,394,312

1948-49

30,388,775

30,338,775

1984-85

51,635,770

107,717,581

1949-50

29,501,955

29,501,955

1985-86

65,464,810

124,381,360

1950-51

20,615,315

20,615,315

1986-87

73,554,964

157,522,970

1951-52

16,619,000

19,619,000

1987-88

78,787,967

164,094,827

1952-53

22,035,850

32,246,298

1988-89

55,051,595

153,450,416

1953-54

36,210,100

42,852,314

1989-90

38,355,557

128,475,489

1954-55

35,373,025

45,182,255

1990-91

29,297,000

102,384,439

1955-56

34,413,550

42,931,755

1991-92

31,983,779

94,7105,82

1956-57

55,753,600

69,658,736

1992-93

22,665,397

84,287,351

1957-58

60,846,200

93,369,084

1993-94

23,286,422

119,310,888

1958-59

123,985,000

166,351,000

1994-95

16,153,974

90,333,823

1959-60

147,146,365

187,516,418

1995-96

16,841,263

99,549,491

1960-61

145,609,075

158,330,575

1996-97

16,058,174

99,438,594

1961-62

71,892,420

83,844,470

1997-98

23,278,341

97,962,833

1962-63

56,191,241

64,201,541

1998-99

17,954,978

94,539,479

1963-64

51,445,597

62,423,597

     

Total State Nurseries: 2,471,692,940

Total All Sources: 4,199,422,429

Forest Tree Seedling Sales, Distribution by Species, By County, Fiscal 99

Coastal Loblolly

Piedmont Loblolly

Longleaf

Misc.

Lespedeza

Texas Loblolly

White Pine (2-0)

Virginia Pine

Red Cedar

Bald-cypress

Leyland Cypress

Sawtooth Oak

Sycamore

Yellow Poplar

Wire Grass

Black Walnut

Carolina Sapphire

Clemson Greenspire

Grand Total

Abbeville

426,083

0

1,000

0

500

1,000

0

200

54

200

0

100

0

100

18

0

429,255

Aiken

3,049,080

236,500

646,285

0

15,000

91,900

1,100

2,900

2,300

3,100

1,062

2,400

0

0

3,015

100

90

72

4,054,904

Allendale

215,500

25,000

475,800

0

0

0

0

2,500

0

180

700

1,200

0

0

100

0

0

720,980

Anderson

585,500

274,358

0

2,000

0

2,000

1,200

2,800

0

3,798

200

500

300

0

1,100

216

54

874,026

Bamberg

1,189,670

42,090

0

28,000

0

500

0

100

0

576

1,000

0

0

0

0

18

18

1,261,972

Barnwell

1,092,200

7,000

71,075

3,200

28,000

1,000

1,500

500

2,600

2,100

486

1,225

1,500

0

0

100

18

18

1,212,522

Beaufort

286,000

540

500

9,000

0

0

0

500

234

0

0

0

3,790

1,600

0

0

302,164

Berkeley

1,758,575

44,535

70,969

27,000

0

100

3,600

200

200

252

800

100

18,429

0

0

180

90

1,925,030

Calhoun

567,000

100

4,000

0

500

600

3,600

1,000

1,134

600

0

0

0

100

36

72

578,742

Charleston

872,736

139,585

90,924

13,000

0

500

3,000

1,300

200

216

1,600

500

100

90

200

0

0

1,123,951

Cherokee

190,655

90

0

0

0

100

645

0

0

810

700

500

0

0

0

0

0

193,500

Chester

540,022

45

0

1,000

0

500

600

500

100

1,080

200

0

0

0

200

72

18

544,337

Chesterfield

1,145,734

9,000

814,135

0

14,000

0

1,000

690

3,000

0

738

200

0

100

5,085

600

64

126

1,994,472

Clarendon

1,970,466

74,810

0

50,000

0

1,000

145

600

100

522

900

100

100

0

0

144

0

2,098,887

Colleton

2,738,625

87,985

113,594

7,000

11,000

0

0

200

500

360

100

0

0

0

0

180

0

2,959,544

Darlington

191,900

65,845

0

22,000

0

100

360

1,200

0

1,980

500

0

0

0

100

378

36

284,399

Dillon

687,980

0

6,000

0

500

45

1,100

500

720

500

0

0

0

0

18

18

697,381

Dorchester

1,697,448

22,995

41,249

0

0

0

3,600

700

0

990

100

0

0

0

0

216

0

1,767,298

Edgefield

678,389

308,000

1,315

500

8,000

500

1,100

90

2,000

600

972

800

500

500

0

500

540

378

1,004,684

Fairfield

1,919,563

90

0

2,000

0

500

450

0

100

720

1,700

100

0

0

0

126

126

1,925,475

Florence

1,123,585

22,605

0

2,000

0

500

2,545

2,500

1,700

1,332

1,800

1,100

2,600

0

100

18

18

1,162,403

Georgetown

2,975,192

12,000

338,989

0

1,100

0

100

0

0

0

0

100

0

0

0

36

0

3,327,517

Greenville

1,000

5,000

0

0

4,000

0

6,400

2,990

4,100

0

1,674

1,000

0

0

0

1,000

108

54

27,326

Greenwood

500

1,682,500

0

0

6,000

0

1,200

1,100

700

100

504

300

0

0

0

0

54

18

1,692,976

Hampton

3,877,446

0

108,680

33,000

27,000

0

0

600

4,100

1,600

216

400

100

100

0

100

36

0

4,053,378

Horry

1,782,400

0

6,725

0

48,000

7,800

2,500

2,770

100

2,000

1,260

100

8,500

500

45

500

108

90

1,863,398

Jasper

2,116,178

0

17,500

30,700

30,000

0

1,000

2,100

0

0

270

200

0

0

0

0

90

90

2,198,128

Kershaw

205,500

478,880

254,305

0

7,000

0

700

4,145

1,800

200

810

200

400

600

45

300

144

108

955,137

Lancaster

0

252,400

0

0

1,000

0

600

45

100

0

324

700

0

0

0

0

90

0

255,259

Laurens

0

1,375,736

9,135

0

8,000

0

1,500

1,145

500

100

738

1,300

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,398,154

Lee

345,784

0

38,500

0

19,000

0

500

3,000

500

2,000

720

3,100

100

0

0

1,000

0

0

414,204

Lexington

773,500

398,750

256,540

0

10,100

1,500

2,600

1,825

4,200

700

3,150

200

500

0

0

700

162

252

1,454,679

Marion

1,152,330

6,000

0

0

0

0

100

45

500

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,158,975

Marlboro

1,436,138

0

13,005

0

0

0

0

45

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,449,188

McCormick

0

42,000

0

0

1,000

500

500

2,100

0

1,000

18

100

0

0

45

0

18

18

47,299

Newberry

1,000

1,096,709

76,500

0

3,000

0

0

0

0

100

972

200

0

0

0

0

144

72

1,178,697

Oconee

24,000

319,020

0

0

6,000

500

0

690

1,600

0

918

0

3,500

0

315

100

450

270

357,363

Orangeburg

1,826,167

0

180,080

61,302

134,000

2,500

1,100

100

4,300

2,100

1,080

6,400

1,100

1,200

0

700

90

90

2,222,309

Pickens

0

230,280

6,725

200

0

0

10,500

835

3,100

1,800

630

300

500

500

0

600

252

180

256,402

Richland

1,411,905

0

154,545

0

14,000

1,000

700

3,535

2,900

3,700

1,404

2,745

500

0

315

600

126

126

1,598,101

Saluda

2,000

1,260,356

545

0

3,500

500

600

1,590

500

500

414

200

100

0

0

0

414

378

1,271,597

Spartanburg

500

176,000

500

0

8,000

0

7,800

3,800

600

500

2,592

600

500

100

180

0

180

234

202,086

Sumter

626,932

5,000

520,715

0

9,000

0

250

1,700

1,000

4,700

1,836

1,900

1,000

0

0

200

72

72

1,174,377

Union

500

645,551

135

0

9,000

0

0

0

0

0

540

100

0

0

0

0

18

18

655,862

Williamsburg

3,288,078

0

27,695

121,817

38,000

0

0

0

500

500

252

500

500

0

0

0

0

0

3,477,842

York

0

481,784

0

100

14,000

0

700

2,390

600

500

4,788

300

300

300

0

0

1,080

108

506,950

Multiple Counties

20,113,513

12,320,500

1,086,645

0

533,500

0

33,400

23,995

20,175

46,075

23,070

3,000

7,900

1,100

9,932

800

728

2,016

34,226,349

Grand Total

61,810,951

24,687,647

4,829,500

1,382,944

1,172,100

119,800

84,650

82,615

79,075

79,075

66,396

40,070

31,700

26,629

22,857

11,500

6,732

5,238

94,539,479


Table of Contents


FIRE MANAGEMENT

Area protected: 12,807,924 acres. Acres protected is based on 1993 Forest Survey data for non-federal forest land, plus 10% to cover adjacent non-forest land. Also included is 101,320 acres of federal land protected under special contract. Mutual aid is provided on 802,147 acres of additional federal land.

WILDFIRE SUMMARY

Agency firefighters recorded 6,615 wildfires during the fiscal year. These fires burned a total of 35,155 acres of forest and grassland. Only 5 wildfires statewide exceeded 200 acres in size; the largest was a 480-acre blaze on Daufuskie Island.

FIRE PROTECTION COOPERATIVES

The Forestry Commission has cooperative arrangements with 11 fire and emergency management entities. Activities for each cooperative during FY 1998-99 are as follows:

Southeastern States Forest Fire Compact Commission: Formed in 1954, the Compact allows member states to provide and receive mutual aid in fighting wildland fires. Member states include: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

SCFC provided firefighting assistance under the Compact to the State of Florida for a 41-day period including parts of FY 98 and FY 99; details appear in the 1998 Annual Report. The SE Compact also provided assistance to the State of Texas as an inter-compact service. A total of 32 SCFC firefighters and 6 tractors provided a total of 481 man-days of assistance in Texas between June 31, 1998 and August 26, 1998.

South Carolina activated the Compact during the period July 20-22, 1998, requesting helibucket assistance on a fire on Table Rock Mountain. The North Carolina Forest Service responded.

SC Division of Emergency Preparedness: There were no emergency activations involving SCFC during the year. Staff foresters participated in several EPD emergency response training sessions.

SC Army National Guard: Under a new agreement with the National Guard, helicopter firefighting support became available upon request from SCFC. Requests from SCFC will be channeled through EPD and the Governor's Office to activate the Guard.

The Guard's primary firefighting mission will be providing helibucket service to SCFC Incident Commanders. SCFC purchased a 750 gallon Bambi bucket for this purpose and trained Guard helicopter crews in its use. Fifteen SCFC firefighters were trained to serve as on-board drop coordinators for helibucket missions.

Rural Cooperative Fire Protection Program: Federal funds for this program have decreased significantly over the past few years. During the year, 58 fire departments were approved for matching-fund grants totaling $28,000.

Federal Excess Property Program: Two hundred and thirty-nine pieces of federal excess equipment were loaned to fire departments during the year. At present, 983 pieces of equipment are assigned to 375 departments statewide.

National Weather Service: NWS provides daily fire weather forecasts and atmospheric dispersion information. During the year, SCFC and NWS worked to improve content and timing of daily forecasts.

USDA Forest Service: Under the terms of a 1996 contract, SCFC provides aerial wildfire detection on 611,407 acres of National Forest land and 198,000 of Savannah River Site land in SC. A mutual aid agreement between the US Forest Service and SCFC allows both parties to provide initial attack firefighting within one-quarter mile of National Forest boundaries.

SCFC provided initial attack on a number of fires on the Francis Marion National Forest during the spring fire season, and SCFC investigators assisted with wildfire investigation and stake-outs.

DOD Corps of Engineers: Beginning in 1997, SCFC has provided all fire suppression services on 55,320 acres of Corps of Engineers land. Under the terms of the agreement, actual fire suppression costs are reimbursed to the SCFC. During the year, SCFC suppressed 8 fires on Corps of Engineers land. The largest of these was 6 acres.

USDI Fish and Wildlife Service: Under the terms of a 1992 land acquisition agreement, SCFC provides initial attack fire suppression on the 46,000 acre Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge. The agreement terminates in 2042. SCFC maintains mutual aid firefighting agreements with the following National Wildlife Refuges: Ace Basin, Cape Romain, Savannah, Pinckney Island, and Santee.

USDI Park Service: Agreement maintained; no reportable activity.

Wildland Fire Protection Partnership: Organized in 1991, the Partnership seeks solutions to wildfire management problems in the wildland-urban interface. Membership includes the SC Forestry Commission, US Forest Service, SC Firemen's Association, Department of Health and Environmental Control, SC Division of Emergency Preparedness, SC Fire Marshal, SC Fire Academy, and SC Forestry Association (ex officio).

During the year, the Partnership prepared legislation that would allow private industry and public agencies to donate un-needed firefighting equipment for use by other firefighting entities. The Forestry Commission would serve as the donation point and manage the distribution of donated equipment. The bill will be introduced during the 2000 legislative session.

FIRE WEATHER

Weather Stations. The Forestry Commission, USDA Forest Service, National Park Service, Department of Defense (Ft. Jackson), and USDI Fish and Wildlife Service share a network of 13 Automated Weather Stations across the state. Data from these stations are used in daily calculations for the National Fire Danger Rating System. Weather readings from these stations are available 24 hours a day for wildfire and prescribed fire management purposes.

Inches Precipitation: FY 99*

Month

Precipitation

July 98

4.46

August

3.88

September

5.69

October

1.68

November

1.52

December

3.70

January 99

5.24

February

2.73

March

2.64

April

3.94

May

2.42

June

4.93

TOTAL 42.83

*measured by NOAA and SC Climatology Office, averaged for state

Precipitation Last 5 Years*

Fiscal Year

Precipitation Inches

Departure from Normal

1994-95

57.29

+6.62

1995-96

47.72

-2.95

1996-97

50.62

-0.05

1997-98

62.62

+11.95

1998-99

42.83

-7.84

Normal Precipitation
50.67*

*measured by NOAA and SC Climatology Office, averaged for state

Readiness Plan. The daily readiness level of Forestry Commission firefighters is based on fire danger data, available number of firefighters, and status of firefighting equipment. Average statewide readiness levels for FY 99 are as follows:

Readiness 1 (No wildfire danger) 14 days
Readiness 2 (Low wildfire danger) 155 days
Readiness 3 (Moderate wildfire danger) 142 days
Readiness 4 (High wildfire danger) 43 days
Readiness 5 (Extreme wildfire danger) 11 days

Burning Ban and Red Flag Fire Alert. A statewide Red Flag Fire Alert issued on June 25, 1998, was still in effect at the beginning of the fiscal year. The Alert was upgraded to a State Forester's Burning Ban for the period July 1-13. Following the removal of the Ban, a Red Flag remained in effect in portions of the state through July 28.

On September 18, 1998, a Red Flag was declared for three upstate counties. It remained in effect until September 21. Fourteen counties in the Pee Dee Region were under a Red Flag from October 27 through November 4, 1998. A Red Flag was in effect for 11 eastern South Carolina counties December 4-14, 1998.

On March 1, 1999, a Red Flag was declared in all counties. This Alert was lifted in the upstate on March 5, and in the remainder of the state on March 9. A Red Flag affecting all but three counties was declared on April 17, 1999; it was lifted in the Pee Dee and Coastal Regions on April 26, and in the Piedmont on April 28.

DISPATCH AND AIR OPERATIONS

Dispatch. Forestry Commission dispatch is by closest available resource, regardless of political or administrative boundaries. Dispatching was handled by Region Dispatch Centers located in Walterboro, Florence, and Newberry.

Air Operations. Eight Forestry Commission pilots equipped with Federal Excess planes provided both fire detection and incident reconnaissance. Private aerial contractors trained in wildfire detection supplemented the agency's resources when needed.

LAW ENFORCEMENT

The Forestry Commission has 62 commissioned law enforcement officers, all certified by the Criminal Justice Academy. During the year, investigators placed strong emphasis on investigation of timber theft and fraud. Public demand for these services continues to grow.

FIRE TRAINING

The following fire training was provided during the year: Basic Firefighting School (SCFC), Basic Firefighting School for Cooperators (SCFC), Introduction to Fire Behavior (S-190), Intermediate Fire Behavior (S-290), Fire Behavior Calculations (S-390), Prescribed Burning School (SCFC). New contract pilots were provided training in SCFC aerial detection procedures.

FIRE PREVENTION/FIRE INFORMATION

During the year, Fire Management produced 36 news releases and provided 202 media interviews.

In addition, the Fire Management Staff produced 17 art/graphic pieces to support SCFC programs; participated with USFS in a Smokey promotion for the Capitol City Bombers; wrote scripts and narrated 2 interagency video productions; and prepared brief illustrated history of SCFC for internet.

Fires by Cause

Cause

Number

Acres Burned

Average Acres
Per Fire

Percent of Total
FY 99

Lightning

97

1,193.6

12.3

2

Campfire

47

498.0

10.6

1

Smoking

170

546.9

3.2

3

Debris Burning

2,975

14,915.2

5.0

44

Incendiary

2,148

14,357.2

6.7

32

Equipment

345

1,185.4

3.4

5

Railroad

47

175.8

3.7

1

Children

324

681.3

2.1

5

Miscellaneous

462

1,602.3

3.5

75

TOTALS

6,615

35,155.5

5.3

100

Five Year Summary All Fires

Fiscal Yr.

Acres Protected

Number of Fires Acres
Burned
Av. Acres/Fire%Area Burned

94-95

12,706,604

3,377

16,524.5

4.9

0.13

95-96

12,706,604

4,341

27,112.1

6.2

0.21

96-97

12,807,924

3,204

21,730.7

6.8

0.17

97-98

12,807,924

1,943

10,425.1

5.4

0.08

98-99

12,807,924

6,615

35,155.5

5.3

0.20

Five Year Averages

3,896

22,189.6

5.7

0.16

PRESCRIBED FIRE

Certified Prescribed Fire Manager Program. Four Certified Prescribed Fire Manager Schools were conducted during the year. Interest in this program continues to be high.

Prescribed Burning for Forestry, Wildlife, and Agriculture
Region Forestry Understory Forestry Site Prep Wildlife Agriculture
No.Acres No.Acres No.Acres No.Acres

Coastal

3,009

194,440

3,090

11,936

517

56,231

4,255

72,128

Pee Dee

1,887

76,130

2,237

10,671

428

27,636

4,001

74,202

Piedmont

328

34,586

318

9,952

52

5,354

612

6,833

Totals

5,224

305,156

5,645

32,559

1,007

89,221

8,968

153,163

Grand Total Burning Under Smoke Management Guidelines: 20,744 fires; 580,099 acres

Acres Protected and Total Burning Notifications by County

CountyAcres
Protected
Dispatch Center
Notifications
Voice Mail
Yard Debris
Abbeville202,6457172,112
Aiken 455,5401,50810,467
Allendale 178,794545842
Anderson 214,7242,27910,644
Bamberg 182,0625071,038
Barnwell 147,0936752,800
Beaufort 136,7391,5565,779
Berkeley 390,2992,04414,212
Calhoun 168,9975071,981
Charleston244,8351,5427,769
Cherokee 165,3866493,177
Chester307,1545882,664
Chesterfield 350,5941,0235,785
Clarendon 241,3141,0953,085
Colleton 502,7761,82812,298
Darlington 206,6416824,468
Dillon 158,9144483,441
Dorchester 283,2051,17711,053
Edgefield 238,7667792,345
Fairfield 409,9854611,730
Florence 322,7791,5767,857
Georgetown 417,1501,4077,356
Greenville 271,8932,67815,753
Greenwood 212,2036693,273
Hampton 279,5111,2364,381
Horry 492,0643,03816,995
Jasper 329,5741,2343,470
Kershaw 413,52772111,325
Lancaster 289,2845813,092
Laurens 325,7146853,943
Lee 149,375378908
Lexington 280,9852,47935,513
Marion203,9065077,786
Marlboro140,0994524,521
McCormick239,275305809
Newberry254,4856111,841
Oconee226,0581,5386,900
Orangeburg438,1542,0945,653
Pickens233,0561,5666,202
Richland280,3982,1586,069
Saluda203,9064661,024
Spartanburg289,0432,3566,697
Sumter258,6851,0587,977
Union229,078261325
Williamsburg450,2411,4423,327
York290,4321,6029,277
Federal Land101,320----------
Totals53,708289,963

Grand Total All Notifications Received: 343,671

Total All Land Fires by County and Cause, Fiscal Year 1999

Lightning

Campfire

Smoking

Debris Burning

Incendiary

Equipment Use

Railroad

Children

Miscellaneous

Total No.

Total Acres

County

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

Abbeville County

1

0.1

1

0.0

1

2.0

17

38.5

5

3.8

6

27.1

3

7.0

4

6.7

5

7.0

43

92.2

Aiken County

8

57.0

1

1.0

1

5.0

88

335.8

74

405.6

12

27.0

0 0

16

43.2

30

86.0

230

960.6

Allendale County

3

8.4

1

0.5

1

0.1

13

58.4

4

44.3

1

1.0

0 0 0 0

1

0.2

24

112.9

Anderson County

1

3.0

1

6.0

1

4.0

17

75.0

16

41.4

6

19.3

0 0

4

16.0

6

16.2

52

180.9

Bamberg County

0 0 0 0

1

0.8

41

195.2

8

14.8

8

35.1

0 0

1

0.1

5

5.5

64

251.5

Barnwell County

2

236.0

0 0

2

4.0

34

80.3

22

59.0

4

27.2

0 0

4

3.1

9

23.6

77

433.2

Beaufort County

0 0

1

5.0

1

10.0

57

799.5

62

342.9

1

15.0

1

2.0

5

10.5

1

1.0

129

1,185.9

Berkeley County

5

71.1

2

2.5

1

2.0

189

903.7

233

2,080.7

13

34.9

0 0

20

25.3

24

135.5

487

3,255.6

Calhoun County

1

3.0

0 0

4

4.4

51

154.5

7

52.1

12

26.5

0 0

1

0.2

6

9.3

82

250.0

Charleston County

1

7.0

0 0 0 0

92

763.1

76

742.5

3

47.1

0 0

1

0.5

3

5.2

176

1,565.4

Cherokee County

1

5.0

4

89.0

2

10.5

11

31.0

4

6.3

1

3.0

0 0

6

23.5

10

51.5

39

219.8

Chester County

5

58.0

0 0 0 0

22

48.2

10

11.9

3

9.0

1

1.0

1

1.0

5

3.6

47

132.7

Chesterfield County

5

29.1

0 0

15

47.1

75

369.9

30

87.8

12

29.2

1

3.0

5

5.8

14

21.7

157

593.6

Clarendon County

0 0 0 0

2

8.0

124

722.6

97

675.9

7

61.0

0 0

2

10.0

3

6.6

235

1,484.1

Colleton County

4

218.1

0 0

1

0.1

198

912.5

71

310.5

24

88.7

0 0

5

10.0

10

24.4

313

1,564.3

Darlington County

0 0

1

3.0

1

1.0

84

239.4

58

374.0

10

66.0

0 0

2

29.0

5

106.5

161

818.9

Dillon County

0 0

2

4.6

3

8.5

54

125.9

30

95.7

9

9.2

0 0

4

13.5

6

15.5

108

272.9

Dorchester County

0 0 0 0

2

0.3

84

271.1

86

501.9

4

2.5

0 0

12

19.2

3

0.4

191

795.4

Edgefield County

1

5.0

1

2.0

3

0.6

10

20.9

9

60.4

2

0.4

1

2.0

3

7.0

7

8.5

37

106.8

Fairfield County

7

78.0

2

54.5

6

55.3

18

38.1

11

32.2

27

31.0

1

50.0

4

3.3

13

9.3

89

351.7

Florence County

1

2.0

1

7.0

4

13.0

138

820.4

187

1,448.9

17

97.3

2

0.6

14

18.9

11

15.7

375

2,423.8

Georgetown County

4

27.0

1

15.0

0 0

70

456.9

75

388.2

1

2.0

0 0 0 0

4

30.2

155

919.3

Greenville County

2

3.9

2

10.0

1

1.0

32

86.5

12

53.2

0 0 0 0

6

14.7

8

8.1

63

177.4

Greenwood County

1

0.1

0 0

7

13.4

33

113.5

5

17.5

2

4.5

1

0.3

7

4.0

9

3.3

65

156.6

Hampton County

6

14.9

0 0

1

1.0

66

119.4

55

485.7

6

11.6

0 0

8

9.9

3

0.7

145

643.2

Horry County

2

15.0

0 0

2

5.0

146

706.6

127

737.3

2

0.4

3

3.7

10

59.8

19

106.3

311

1,634.1

Jasper County

0 0 0 0

1

0.1

74

358.1

103

1,028.4

7

5.7

0 0

5

16.0

4

3.5

194

1,411.8

Kershaw County

5

103.6

1

2.0

10

28.0

65

209.4

7

70.7

12

157.3

0 0

14

29.8

14

52.5

128

653.3

Lancaster County

2

14.0

2

45.0

5

28.3

22

42.4

4

10.0

3

14.0

0 0

4

11.3

6

24.5

48

189.5

Laurens County

2

42.0

1

7.0

3

3.6

10

25.4

16

42.8

3

6.5

3

18.1

5

9.6

6

23.0

49

178.0

Lee County

1

0.1

0 0

4

9.5

85

948.3

53

464.0

3

6.5

0 0

1

0.5

20

164.6

167

1,593.5

Lexington County

4

6.5

1

3.5

12

15.1

112

224.9

18

38.8

21

15.6

2

0.3

69

67.9

27

21.9

266

394.5

Marion County

2

1.8

0 0

2

0.2

35

82.8

28

117.3

4

11.1

3

2.6

1

0.5

9

66.9

84

283.2

Marlboro County

1

0.1

0 0

2

10.7

41

190.2

61

232.9

13

72.3

2

5.2

4

3.8

6

10.0

130

525.2

McCormick County

1

2.0

0 0

1

0.3

8

2.8

6

7.4

4

1.6

6

7.1

0 0

16

48.2

42

69.4

Newberry County

0 0

1

2.0

1

1.0

20

35.9

8

11.6

3

1.8

4

16.9

1

1.0

21

162.5

59

232.7

Oconee County

2

35.0

2

1.3

1

0.1

35

89.2

11

12.1

2

1.2

2

8.5

3

1.2

18

17.2

76

165.8

Orangeburg County

1

1.6

3

26.5

26

64.9

181

980.1

64

312.4

25

64.6

1

22.0

25

66.5

18

58.0

344

1,596.6

Pickens County

2

11.5

4

166.5

4

14.7

34

41.2

10

14.9

1

0.5

1

0.5

5

5.0

18

33.4

79

288.2

Richland County

1

0.1

0 0

3

4.0

60

344.6

44

456.2

4

14.1

3

12.0

10

53.5

7

15.1

132

899.6

Saluda County

2

6.1

0 0

1

0.2

23

39.4

9

34.4

5

13.1

0 0

1

0.2

6

5.3

47

98.7

Spartanburg County

1

50.0

3

3.0

3

16.0

17

43.1

8

39.0

3

9.0

2

4.0

5

21.5

9

71.6

51

257.2

Sumter County

2

11.0

3

8.0

3

0.5

115

846.5

74

430.7

2

10.0

1

2.5

12

29.4

12

52.7

224

1,391.3

Union County

3

7.5

1

1.0

1

3.0

16

52.5

5

19.5

2

2.1

0 0

2

0.7

7

14.0

37

100.3

Williamsburg County

4

59.0

3

26.5

23

147.6

233

1,780.6

234

1,906.1

21

74.0

1

0.5

7

23.2

5

15.1

531

4,032.6

York County

0 0

1

5.5

1

2.0

25

91.0

11

33.6

14

28.5

2

6.0

5

4.5

13

40.4

72

211.5

Grand Total

97

1,193.6

47

498.0

170

546.9

2,975

14,915.2

2,148

14,357.1

345

1,185.4

47

175.8

324

681.3

462

1,602.3

6,615

35,155.5

Total All Land Fires by County and Month, Fiscal Year 1999

1998

1999

TOTAL

TOTAL

JULY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

COUNTY

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

No.

Acres

Abbeville County

3

1.2

1

2.0

2

0.6

1

0.3

3

5.5

1

0.0

5

5.2

5

22.3

5

15.5

4

6.5

4

17.0

9

16.1

43

92.2

Aiken County

33

245.8

19

45.6

11

12.6

12

30.9

9

14.0

14

43.8

18

36.7

26

188.0

35

186.1

23

60.1

19

68.3

11

28.7

230

960.6

Allendale County

1

40.0

1

1.0

1

0.2

0 0 0 0

4

6.4

1

1.0

4

12.6

4

32.5

3

5.1

0 0

5

14.1

24

112.9

Anderson County

2

14.0

2

10.0

5

11.3

3

4.5

2

4.0

0 0

3

4.2

8

33.8

14

30.9

10

59.2

0 0

3

9.0

52

180.9

Bamberg County

8

40.8

3

0.5

0 0

6

10.6

2

4.0

6

28.2

4

13.0

11

78.4

12

46.2

6

26.1

1

0.1

5

3.6

64

251.5

Barnwell County

12

13.3

4

15.2

1

0.5

6

12.1

4

2.1

6

15.8

7

13.9

14

25.6

16

65.0

3

10.6

1

231.0

3

28.1

77

433.2

Beaufort County

1

3.0

1

0.5

0 0

6

24.5

9

28.6

18

68.2

10

21.3

21

156.5

42

727.7

16

127.6

2

16.0

3

12.0

129

1,185.9

Berkeley County

22

38.7

6

7.4

4

3.2

17

47.1

59

206.5

53

213.2

39

258.7

90

741.4

123

1,021.9

50

685.0

6

11.0

18

21.6

487

3,255.6

Calhoun County

5

4.2

5

1.0

1

1.0

7

9.1

8

2.3

5

22.6

5

4.1

10

102.2

16

58.4

11

23.6

5

9.3

4

12.2

82

250.0

Charleston County

10

124.1

1

15.0

4

8.4

4

37.0

14

57.5

17

139.1

14

34.2

26

387.6

50

506.1

24

174.8

4

10.6

8

71.0

176

1,565.4

Cherokee County

5

14.0

1

5.0

1

0.5

3

29.0

3

10.0

4

15.0

0 0

4

20.0

7

25.5

9

96.3

1

0.5

1

4.0

39

219.8

Chester County

3

12.2

5

43.2

3

11.0

1

7.0

5

4.7

1

0.1

1

3.0

1

1.0

4

5.1

7

13.0

10

16.9

6

15.5

47

132.7

Chesterfield County

12

25.2

4

1.3

4

8.1

11

32.7

6

28.7

10

29.6

15

79.0

22

68.6

29

145.4

32

148.7

4

17.2

8

9.1

157

593.6

Clarendon County

14

24.0

4

6.2

2

0.9

17

35.6

30

81.2

26

154.7

8

89.7

38

303.6

45

468.6

31

234.3

3

56.5

17

28.8

235

1,484.1

Colleton County

12

33.7

2

1.1

4

15.3

10

26.2

26

59.2

32

116.2

33

226.0

63

237.5

79

477.7

33

313.3

6

9.2

13

48.9

313

1,564.3

Darlington County

7

6.7

1

3.0

4

7.8

22

66.5

19

51.0

15

70.5

14

173.1

24

135.8

25

150.8

13

60.9

4

8.0

13

84.8

161

818.9

Dillon County

12

6.1

2

0.6

4

3.6

16

38.4

13

37.1

5

15.1

2

1.1

11

50.2

18

60.6

11

23.5

6

5.9

8

30.7

108

272.9

Dorchester County

13

120.4

8

10.0

3

3.5

5

7.5

18

41.0

30

81.0

13

25.1

28

119.3

38

251.1

19

110.2

6

12.5

10

13.8

191

795.4

Edgefield County

4

5.7

1

0.1

2

12.0

6

21.1

3

6.3

0 0 0 0

5

26.7

3

13.0

7

6.5

3

2.7

3

12.7

37

106.8

Fairfield County

11

107.9

12

43.6

1

0.1

4

9.3

2

2.0

1

0.1

5

6.5

9

11.7

15

83.7

8

57.2

6

5.7

15

23.9

89

351.7

Florence County

10

9.2

3

5.2

6

5.8

45

93.3

60

224.5

48

327.8

14

126.9

35

234.1

74

837.8

28

238.1

26

198.0

26

123.1

375

2,423.8

Georgetown County

9

156.1

2

1.1

5

4.3

7

34.6

18

54.2

11

31.1

6

5.3

24

159.1

36

176.0

22

278.6

11

18.1

4

0.8

155

919.3

Greenville County

4

6.9

2

3.0

2

3.0

4

5.6

7

10.8

3

1.7

1

1.0

3

12.0

18

73.1

15

54.5

1

0.8

3

5.0

63

177.4

Greenwood County

9

3.8

5

4.2

2

0.8

4

9.0

3

16.0

6

6.4

2

10.1

4

5.3

13

54.8

8

10.0

4

2.7

5

33.5

65

156.6

Hampton County

8

4.9

5

3.4

2

0.8

4

13.1

9

6.1

12

30.7

14

13.2

22

61.8

40

459.9

19

31.5

2

3.0

8

14.8

145

643.2

Horry County

12

20.8

3

1.2

8

58.1

35

133.2

47

192.5

47

281.5

7

28.0

29

172.4

72

587.8

37

135.3

10

19.3

4

4.0

311

1,634.1

Jasper County

5

2.6

1

2.0

2

3.1

1

0.1

11

39.0

13

50.8

14

49.2

42

418.2

74

566.6

21

199.2

8

55.0

2

26.0

194

1,411.8

Kershaw County

8

113.0

4

1.7

4

2.5

8

16.5

8

19.5

6

10.7

11

22.9

16

158.6

14

98.2

20

132.3

14

39.0

15

38.4

128

653.3

Lancaster County

9

10.9

0 0

1

2.0

0 0 0 0

2

15.2

6

13.7

5

13.0

13

90.3

6

13.4

5

30.9

1

0.1

48

189.5

Laurens County

8

25.5

3

17.5

2

42.0

2

6.0

4

6.5

3

1.0

1

0.5

1

1.0

11

38.6

6

12.3

5

18.6

3

8.5

49

178.0

Lee County

10

24.2

5

12.6

2

4.0

9

19.5

9

38.4

7

129.5

13

226.0

29

260.6

33

518.9

29

275.2

3

8.4

18

76.2

167

1,593.5

Lexington County

22

17.8

10

9.3

10

16.1

18

26.6

13

6.9

16

24.2

28

81.6

30

49.8

38

29.3

40

74.8

22

34.9

19

23.2

266

394.5

Marion County

8

58.6

0 0

7

37.6

8

20.2

11

20.5

6

27.8

5

12.0

6

9.2

19

76.5

11

12.2

0 0

3

8.6

84

283.2

Marlboro County

4

18.6

1

0.1

3

3.3

8

28.0

8

13.5

11

17.3

7

36.5

10

49.0

39

191.9

25

142.8

6

15.5

8

8.7

130

525.2

McCormick County

4

8.6

4

1.9

3

26.3

1

0.1

0 0

2

6.5

1

0.3

3

4.7

6

3.6

7

5.7

3

0.6

8

11.1

42

69.4

Newberry County

9

25.6

4

6.7

1

3.0

2

1.2

0 0

2

0.5

2

4.0

11

36.8

9

5.6

10

39.7

2

3.5

7

106.1

59

232.7

Oconee County

4

0.8

6

1.3

8

11.6

3

3.1

5

10.0

7

4.7

4

3.6

1

1.0

15

59.1

17

34.3

4

32.3

2

4.0

76

165.8

Orangeburg County

12

12.0

10

36.3

6

12.0

19

39.6

34

124.4

52

181.1

32

119.3

47

262.0

85

658.8

27

100.7

5

27.7

15

22.7

344

1,596.6

Pickens County

7

18.7

5

4.7

8

11.3

5

8.6

4

20.0

2

3.0

2

0.7

5

8.2

27

192.1

9

8.4

5

12.5

0 0

79

288.2

Richland County

9

40.9

5

6.2

2

3.0

8

21.4

12

80.0

9

101.3

12

92.1

22

133.0

28

323.9

13

70.3

6

13.0

6

14.5

132

899.6

Saluda County

1

0.1

3

15.0

0 0

8

27.5

3

4.6

2

4.0

5

10.8

2

2.0

11

18.9

8

14.6

1

0.1

3

1.1

47

98.7

Spartanburg County

3

3.7

3

10.5

1

1.0

3

5.1

3

3.0

2

8.0

2

4.0

10

38.0

9

72.2

11

94.2

1

1.5

3

16.0

51

257.2

Sumter County

10

56.1

7

39.7

3

7.0

26

60.5

26

283.8

23

44.7

22

192.0

20

235.0

43

305.0

31

149.3

5

7.3

8

10.9

224

1,391.3

Union County

5

11.0

5

24.0

0 0

1

0.1

2

2.0

1

1.0

4

4.0

2

5.5

7

29.0

5

20.0

3

3.0

2

0.7

37

100.3

Williamsburg County

16

118.1

7

13.6

12

75.3

68

376.6

65

353.0

84

425.0

33

219.4

74

461.6

96

1,318.2

54

546.3

9

21.3

13

104.2

531

4,032.6

York County

9

17.5

1

7.0

2

2.0

2

5.2

3

1.9

5

9.5

14

23.1

4

7.5

16

81.1

14

51.7

1

0.5

1

4.5

72

211.5

Grand Total

405

1667.0

187

440.5

159

436.5

456

1404.0

600

2177

630

2765

459

2296

877

5522

1426

11239

813

4988

253

1066

350

1155

6615

35155.5

Law Enforcement Report, Fiscal Year 1999

 

 

County

Prosecutions

Investigations

 

Burn Site Inspections

State Forests

Outdoor Burning

Woods Arson

Juvenile Cases

Total

Fire

Smoke

Timber
Theft/Fraud

Cleared/
Prosecuted

Prose-cutions

Fines

ViolationsFines

Abbeville

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

12

5

1

(1)

0

0

($0.00)

Aiken

5

($575.00)

0

3

8

20

4

3

(5)

0

0

($0.00)

Allendale

1

($50.00)

0

0

1

14

1

0

(0)

0

0

($0.00)

Anderson

0

($0.00)

11

0

11

11

16

0

(0)

0

0

($0.00)

Bamberg

8

($600.00)

0

0

8

12

0

2

(2)

1

0

($0.00)

Barnwell

15

($780.00)

0

0

15

52

2

0

(0)

14

0

($0.00)

Beaufort

4

($400.00)

0

0

4

68

2

0

(0)

9

0

($0.00)

Berkeley

56

($6,935.00)

8

0

64

359

4

2

(2)

47

0

($0.00)

Calhoun

10

($1,555.00)

0

0

10

59

8

1

(1)

12

0

($0.00)

Charleston

17

($575.00)

0

0

17

80

8

0

(0)

12

0

($0.00)

Cherokee

2

($180.00)

0

0

2

2

9

0

(0)

0

0

($0.00)

Chester

3

($280.00)

0

0

3

3

7

0

(0)

0

0

($0.00)

Chesterfield

33

($1,977.00)

1

0

34

0

3

0

(0)

35

0

($0.00)

Clarendon

6

($525.00)

0

0

6

0

3

2

(1)

5

0

($0.00)

Colleton

55

($4,325.00)

6

0

61

190

5

0

(0)

27

0

($0.00)

Darlington

4

($175.00)

0

0

4

0

4

0

(0)

9

0

($0.00)

Dillon

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

0

0

1

(1)

0

0

($0.00)

Dorchester

34

($1,433.00)

0

0

34

145

7

0

(0)

21

0

($0.00)

Edgefield

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

5

8

4

(4)

0

0

($0.00)

Fairfield

1

($125.00)

0

0

1

10

7

2

(2)

2

0

($0.00)

Florence

40

($2,999.00)

0

0

40

0

7

1

(1)

0

0

($0.00)

Georgetown

9

($1,850.00)

1

0

10

0

3

0

(0)

0

0

($0.00)

Greenville

2

($0.00)

13

0

15

22

9

1

(1)

0

0

($0.00)

Greenwood

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

0

15

0

(0)

0

0

($0.00)

Hampton

1

($100.00)

0

0

1

51

0

0

(0)

17

0

($0.00)

Horry

20

($685.00)

0

0

20

0

11

2

(2)

28

0

($0.00)

Jasper

10

($1,375.00)

0

0

10

42

4

0

(0)

5

0

($0.00)

Kershaw

42

($4,840.00)

0

0

42

0

4

6

(5)

23

0

($0.00)

Lancaster

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

0

1

0

(0)

4

0

($0.00)

Laurens

1

($125.00)

32

0

33

32

4

3

(3)

6

0

($0.00)

Lee

4

($650.00)

0

0

4

0

0

0

(0)

17

0

($0.00)

Lexington

43

($6,135.00)

0

34

77

150

64

3

(2)

17

0

($0.00)

Marion

1

($75.00)

0

0

1

0

0

0

(0)

0

0

($0.00)

Marlboro

10

($545.00)

1

0

11

0

1

1

(1)

2

0

($0.00)

McCormick

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

13

8

2

(2)

0

0

($0.00)

Newberry

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

3

6

5

(2)

0

0

($0.00)

Oconee

5

($800.00)

1

0

6

37

6

2

(2)

4

0

($0.00)

Orangeburg

73

($13,495.00)

0

0

73

116

4

3

(3)

15

0

($0.00)

Pickens

10

($875.00)

10

0

20

34

16

0

(0)

3

0

($0.00)

Richland

6

($575.00)

0

11

17

75

11

2

(2)

0

0

($0.00)

Saluda

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

10

5

3

(3)

4

0

($0.00)

Spartanburg

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

4

16

6

(6)

4

0

($0.00)

Sumter

11

($1,425.00)

0

0

11

0

3

0

(0)

24

0

($0.00)

Union

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

4

9

0

(0)

0

0

($0.00)

Williamsburg

58

($4,290.00)

3

0

61

0

1

0

(0)

0

0

($0.00)

York

4

($750.00)

0

0

4

25

33

1

(1)

14

0

($0.00)

Manchester SF

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

0

0

0

(0)

0

13

($1,800.00)

Sandhills SF

0

($0.00)

0

0

0

0

0

0

(0)

0

8

($1,375.00)

Totals

604

($62,029.00)

87

48

739

1660

344

59

(56)

381

21

($3,175.00)

Fifty-nine timber theft and related investigations cleared; timber value of $372,740.
Timber theft cases pending court pleas or settlements valued at $150,000.
Presented 8 Timber Theft Awareness and Prevention programs to landowners and forestry professionals.

Table of Contents


INSECT AND DISEASE

The Insect and Disease Section in cooperation with the State Division of Plant Industry and the U.S. Forest Service maintains a program to detect, evaluate, and suppress forest pests. Through cooperative agreements, these agencies make their technical assistance and advice available to the Forestry Commission.

The current forest pest detection and reporting system involves the reporting by field foresters of forest pests that are causing abnormal losses, require control action, or which may present new problems. Aerial surveys are made periodically for specific pests to determine occurrence and the need for suppression action.

MAJOR INSECT PROBLEMS

Southern Pine Beetle

The southern pine beetle outbreak began in Horry and Georgetown counties in 1997 collapsed during 1998. These counties were dropped from outbreak status at that time.

In the Piedmont, a new outbreak began in September of 1998. Chester, York, Union, Edgefield, McCormick and Saluda counties were declared to be in outbreak status at that time. Only York was flown 100% due to timing factors related to the onset of fall coloration. The largest and most active spots were in western York County.

Losses to SPB during the fiscal year were well below the 20-year average of $7.8 million per year. During the year, we mapped 2,438 active spots containing 195,409 trees. These trees contained a volume of 11,106 cords and 7,816,335 board feet. The green stumpage value lost to the beetles was $3,320,036.

During the Spring, 28 counties were pheromone trapped to get an indication of anticipated beetle activity. Most counties had a prediction of "Declining ­ Low" beetle activity. Newberry County trapped the most beetles with the resulting prediction of a severe outbreak. Trapping in Cherokee, Chester and York yielded enough beetles for a prediction of "Increasing ­ High" beetle populations. Edgefield, Lancaster and Saluda fell in the next category of "Static ­ Moderate" increase. By the first of July, activity was beginning to pick up in those counties in which it was predicted. Surveys are planned for next fiscal year in those counties which had increasing prediction trends.

MAJOR DISEASE PROBLEMS

Oak Wilt

Oak wilt disease has been identified in Aiken, Barnwell, Chesterfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, Lee, and Richland counties. Except for the recent discoveries in Aiken and Barnwell counties, the disease appears to be static and causing losses only to low-value oaks. Since there is potential for loss of valuable trees, including urban trees, periodic surveys are made to evaluate the spread.

Dutch Elm Disease

Dutch Elm disease has been confirmed in Aiken, Anderson, Cherokee, Chester, Chesterfield, Edgefield, Fairfield, Greenville, Greenwood, Kershaw, Lancaster, Laurens, Lexington, Marlboro, Newberry, Oconee, Pickens, Richland, Saluda, Spartanburg, and York counties. It is expected to gradually spread through the state because the primary agent of spread, the smaller European elm bark beetle, occurs statewide.

Dogwood Anthracnose

In 1988, a new anthracnose disease of dogwood was noted for the first time in South Carolina. This disease is caused by the fungus Discula destructiva. Symptoms include foliage blighting, canker formation and progressive deterioration. Infected trees usually are killed by the fungus in 2-3 years. At this time, infected trees have been found in Anderson, Greenville, Laurens, Oconee, Pickens, and Spartanburg counties. As part of a southwide effort, the Forestry Commission has established 19 permanent plots in the counties known to harbor infections of the fungus. The dogwoods in those plots will be monitored periodically to determine the rate of spread of this potentially devastating disease.

MISCELLANEOUS INSECT AND DISEASE CHECKS

Commission foresters made approximately 757 field checks of insect and disease problems and made recommendations for prevention and control. Other inquiries were handled by telephone, mail, and personal contact.

MYCORRHIZAL INOCULATION

A project was continued at Creech Seed Orchard this year to inoculate containerized longleaf seedlings with the mycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius (P.t.). Funding was not available to operationally inoculate the seedling crop for this year. However, approximately 80,000 seedlings were inoculated by I&D with sprayed spores. We have now done spore inoculations for 10 years and have had 100% success.

INSECT AND DISEASE LABORATORY

During Fiscal Year 98-99 the Insect and Disease Laboratory processed 74 samples. These were submitted for analysis by Commission employees and private individuals. Recommendations for control of the pests that were identified were given where needed.

FOREST HEALTH

The SCFC entered into an agreement with the USFS to evaluate permanent Forest Health plots throughout South Carolina. This was done by the Management Section and reported there. As another part of this program, the Forestry Commission also received additional funding for off-plot activity to survey for and report on other forest insects and diseases. A survey for hardwood defoliators performed during the Spring found no significant defoliator activity. However, hail damage was found on 47,656 acres in Aiken, Marlboro, Newberry and Saluda Counties. In the Sandhills counties and adjoining areas which do not usually have SPB problems, we surveyed this year for beaver damage and fire mortality. In these 18 counties, 13,195 acres were lost to beaver damage and 3,905 acres to fire.

Future surveys for defoliators and other forest pests will now be done using uniform guidelines and loss reporting.

Table of Contents


ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

The Environmental Management Section is responsible for the development and implementation of South Carolina Forestry Commission programs that are related to the environmental protection of forest and associated natural resources. Issues that are addressed include the protection of water quality, site productivity, endangered species, and unique ecosystems.

BMP MANUAL

South Carolina's Best Management Practices for Forestry was originally published in March 1994. Copies are distributed to loggers, landowners, and foresters at BMP educational programs and upon individual request. This year, the BMP manual was reprinted for the third time and BMPs for Braided Streams: A Supplement to the 1994 BMP Manual was published and distributed.

BMP IMPLEMENTATION MONITORING

Compliance with harvesting BMPs has been documented in three previous surveys. Compliance for harvesting BMPs was 84.5% in 1990, 84.7% in 1991, and 89.5% in 1994. A new survey was initiated in the spring of 1997 to update BMP compliance. Compliance with harvesting BMPs in the 1997 survey improved to 91.5%. Two hundred sites were located and inspected throughout South Carolina by BMP Foresters. In the winter of 1998, site preparation BMPs were evaluated on the same 200 sites as the first part of a two-year monitoring study. A third and final site visit to each monitoring location was conducted in early 1999 to determine site preparation BMP compliance, regeneration methods, site stabilization, conversion to other uses, and other related factors. In the last site preparation monitoring survey, conducted in 1996, overall compliance was 86.4%. Overall compliance with site preparation BMPs in the 1999 survey rose to 98%. Data from the 1997, 1998, and 1999 site visits are currently being compiled for publication.

BMP EDUCATION/TRAINING PROGRAM

BMP training and education are essential to the success of the Forestry Commission's non-regulatory BMP program. During this fiscal year, 42 BMP meetings were held across the state for forest landowner groups, government agencies, and professional organizations. A total of 1,342 people attended these meetings. Included in these meetings were four Timber Operations Professional (TOP) workshops and two TOP Road Construction workshops, which reached 159 loggers, landowners, foresters, and road construction contractors.

COURTESY EXAM PROGRAM

The S.C. Forestry Commission's BMP Foresters, located in each of the three operating regions of South Carolina, offer courtesy BMP exams to landowners, foresters, and timber buyers. The BMP Forester makes site-specific BMP recommendations to follow while conducting forestry activities. During the 1998-99 fiscal year, the BMP Foresters completed 362 courtesy exams. Of the 362 sites, 358 (99%) were completed in compliance with our recommended guidelines.

ENDANGERED SPECIES

This year, the Environmental Management Section continued training on endangered species biology and management, with an emphasis on those species that may impact forestry operations. The BMP Foresters are available to provide information and assistance to SCFC personnel, foresters, and private landowners. This assistance may include site visits, cooperating on the Safe Harbor program administered by the S.C. Department of Natural Resources, and assisting State Forests and other state-owned properties upon request. This year, the BMP foresters made 20 site visits to assist landowners and foresters with endangered species identification and information.

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING

In FY 97-98, the S.C. Forestry Commission signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) to encourage cooperation between the two agencies with regard to BMP compliance. During FY 98-99, the BMP Foresters conducted five training sessions to familiarize over 220 SCDNR Wildlife Law Enforcement Officers with BMP guidelines.


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DISPATCH AND FOREST TECHNOLOGY

The Commission's Forest Fire Computer Aided Dispatch System (CADS) has been enhanced with computer hardware upgrades that provide four (4) times the processing power and ten (10) times the network speed at each dispatch center. This has greatly improved the mapping display performance of CADS and system reliability. Pee Dee and Coastal Dispatch centers were upgraded from three to five fully equipped dispatch consoles enabling each administrative area to be handled by one dispatcher during peak times. CADS workstations are also being installed in each Regional Office to enhance the monitoring of current fire situations.

The dispatch centers are also being upgraded to the most current map display and address matching data available for South Carolina. This will increase the accuracy and reduce the time required to locate burning notifications and wildfires. Large forest landowners' properties (i.e. US Forest Service, forest industry, etc.) are being added to the mapping system of CADS as it becomes available to the Commission.

Software enhancements and modifications to CADS; installation of a phone and radio recording system; and enhancements to the mapping application will be accomplished as funding becomes available. The Commission is also exploring a cooperative effort with the US Geological Survey on a Hazard Support System being developed to detect wildfires utilizing classified ballistic missile satellites, weather satellites, and other technology.

The Commission was a major cooperator in the 1999 National Aerial Photography Program, which acquired 1:40,000 color infrared aerial photography of South Carolina during January and February of 1999. The Commission is currently working with the Department of Natural Resources and other agencies to have this photography digitized so various computer applications and geographical information systems can more easily utilize it.

Eleven Global Positioning Systems (GPS) were purchased and placed into operation at the field level. These units will be utilized to measure and map forest management activities (i.e. reforestation, timber stand improvement, stand boundaries, etc.), wildfires, etc. These systems will supplement the traditional methods for acreage determination and mapping currently being used by field personnel.

Work continues on upgrading field computer software and operating systems to be Year 2000 Compliant (Y2K). Computers were installed at four (4) project foresters offices to assist in the preparation of forest management plans, correspondences to landowners, record keeping, etc. Mapping software and hardware for field foresters are being evaluated for ease of use, functionality, and compatibility with current computer hardware. Plans are to purchase mapping software and hardware in FY 2000.

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EQUIPMENT

The Equipment Section is responsible for development and implementation of statewide programs concerning use, design and maintenance of specialized forest fire control equipment.

This section is responsible for providing technical assistance and advice to repair shops, developing specifications for fire suppression equipment and motor vehicle fleet, and arranging training for all field mechanics.

All regular and specialized fire control equipment is modified and processed for field use at the Commission's Central Repair Shop. The Central Repair Shop personnel made numerous repairs to Forestry Commission vehicles and equipment and manufactured fire control equipment. The following list is some of the major accomplishments performed by the Central Repair Shop.

EQUIPMENT PURCHASED

Coastal Region

Pee Dee Region

Piedmont Region

Manchester State Forest

Sand Hills State Forest

Columbia Headquarters

TRAINING FOR MECHANICS

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ADMINISTRATION
Financial Statement

REVENUES

State Appropriations

19,664,933

Federal Grants

2,233,153.00

Earmarked Funds

Hunting & Fishing License

39,041

Refund of Prior Year Expenditure*

99,241

Burning Assistance Fee

116,880

Fire Lane Fee

143,175

Timber Marking Fee

20,005

Training Conf - Registr Fee

3,116

User Fee - State Park & Forest

33,526

Miscellaneous Fee

8,580

Construction of Water Bar

10,875

Stand By for Prescribed Burning

9,495

Sale of Seedlings

969,098

Sale of Timber

1,246,995

Rent - Residence

12,652

Rent - Farm Land

20,852

Rent - State Owned Property

18,100

Rent - Equipment

10,639

Contributions & Donations

739

Insurance Claims

9,188

Sale of Services

41,640

Sale of Publications

24

Commission-Vending Machines

939

Sale of Junk

672

Forest Product Assessment

989,816

Sale of Assets

180,599

Total Earmarked

$3,985,889

Total Revenue

$25,883,975

EXPENDITURES

Transferred to General Fund

37,907

State

18,921,615

Federal

2,089,967

Earmarked

3,892,325

Total Expenditures

$24,941,814

EXCESS OF REVENUE O/(U) EXPENDITURES

$942,161

*Funds refunded from Florida

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

The Human Resource Management Section administers the following programs for the SCFC:

SAFETY

Statewide

The Forestry Commission continues to have one of the lowest Workers Compensation premium rates in state government.

The Motor Vehicle Accident Review Procedure (2803) was revised and accident packets distributed for all vehicles.

A Safety Award was presented to Taylor Nursery along with a personal letter to each employee from the State Forester. Wrist watches and letters of commendation were presented to the Pee Dee Safety Committee members for their leadership.

The Headquarters Safety Committee was reorganized to represent Headquarters, Administration and Field Operations Support. The committee met quarterly. Members are Andy Boone/Insect & Disease, Mike Heath/Law Enforcement, Russell Hubright/Harbison & I&E, Charlie Hall/Central Repair Shop, Jimmy Lisenby/Nurseries & Tree Improvement, Chet Foyle/State Forests, and Rhett Bickley.

Weekly articles were prepared for the agency's in-house newsletter.

Fire resistant clothing was issued to all firefighters. A chart indicating appropriate fire clothing has been prepared and will be added to the Commission's Policy.

Units continue to review office environments for security, workplace safety, and emergencies. Regions are investigating the feasibility of overhead strobe lights and interior dome lights on tractors.

Safety Officers work with the Training Director to provide and document personnel safety training.

Safety Officers attended the annual SCOSC meeting held at Myrtle Beach and participated in other safety training activities during the year.

Coastal Region

The Coastal Region made a conscious effort to do an even better safety job this year. Specific accomplishments include fire-line safety and checks for individuals wearing personal protective equipment (PPE). A second set of Nomex was issued to region personnel. A supply of water and Gatorade are on hand for emergencies. Forty-eight quart coolers have been issued to rangers and ranger technicians for firefighters and work details. The fire cache and first aid supplies have been reviewed and are to standards. Shop inspections have been conducted and fire extinguishers inspected.

Pee Dee Region

All employees have been trained and re-certified in First aid and CPR. First Report of Injury and OSHA 200 training have been held for all area secretaries. Safety Equipment inspections have been performed on all fire suppression units. Shop inspections were held at Florence and Kingstree and corrected all deficiencies. The Region continues to produce "Safety Zone" quarterly newsletter. Monthly and annual inspections of fire extinguishers were conducted.

Piedmont Region

All employees have been trained and re-certified in First aid and CPR. Defensive Driver's training was held for drivers of agency equipment. First aid kits were upgraded and cross training conducted in equipment operation. Fire shelter and Incident Command training was held for the Region. Regular non-scheduled shop inspections were performed.

State Forests

Manchester Shop inspection.

Nursery and Tree Improvement

The following training was conducted: Adult CPR/First Aid; Biological Wastewater: Waterborne & Bloodborne Pathogens (NPDES Permit Compliance); Forklift & Defensive Drivers training; Combination CDL/Hazardous Material Endorsement; training in PPE & pesticide use; Fire extinguisher inspection/fire extinguisher ddemonstration. A safety audit was held at Taylor Nursery.

Headquarters/Harbison

The Insect & Disease lab was monitored for allergens and pesticide residue by the Dept. of Labor Licensing & Regulations.

Harbison I&E staff received training in CPR/First Aid and chainsaw operation; routine awareness to include hot weather operations; retrofitting a 350 fire-tractor to meet Commission standards; reviewing demonstration sawmill and tower operations for employee and visitor safety.

Equipment & Central Repair Shop staff received training in attention to safety awareness, safe operations, and PPE.

Bulletproof vests were purchased for all law enforcement officers. Instructors were certified for Preventing Disease Transmission/Bloodborne Pathogens. The Agency committed to Class 1 officer training, with first hires attending the full nine-week instruction at CJA.

Fire extinguishers serviced throughout headquarters complex.

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ECONOMIC AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

Forest and wood product business development and recruiting as well as rural development assistance is a component of the Forestry Commission's mission. The goal is to maximize the benefits to the state from the forest resource base.

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

3 business assists this year resulted in announced new investment of $3.55 million and creation of 78 new jobs.

33 business recruiting contacts were maintained, with 15 contacts initiated this year.

14 existing business development assists were provided.

126 requests for technical information or industry directories were processed.

Business promotion activities included a South Carolina exhibit at the International Woodworking and Furniture Supply Fair '99 in Atlanta, GA; Carolina's Woodworking Show, Greensboro, NC; Interzum '99, Cologne, Germany; Engineered Wood Research Foundation, Hilton Head, SC; and the Forest Products Machinery and Equipment Expo' 99, Atlanta, GA.

Trade promotion activities included generation of 366 trade leads at Interzum '99. In addition, visits were hosted for a European delegation (Germany & Austria) of wood products companies; the Minister of Forests and Environment from Rhineland Pfalz, Germany; and the trade office from Singapore.

RURAL DEVELOPMENT

Rural development activities included sponsorship and participation in Governor's Rural Summit, participation in national Forest Products Conservation & Recycling (FPC&R) conference, two National Rural Development Partnership conferences, and continuing to serve as state co-chair of South Carolina Rural Development Council.

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INTERNAL AUDIT

The Internal Audit Department is an independent appraisal function that examines and evaluates the adequacy and effectiveness of Commission activities as a service to all levels of Management and the Commissioners. Emphasis is on auditing the agency's activities, processes, systems, and operations to ascertain efficiency in quality services.

During Fiscal Year 1998 - 1999 the Internal Audit Department assisted in the development of the South Carolina Forestry Commission's Annual Accountability Report for Fiscal Year 1997 - 1998. This Accountability Report details our efforts in serving our customers.

Other activities include: an audit of the Forest Renewal Program; a follow-up audit of the Taylor Nursery Petty Cash Account; a follow-up audit of the Creech Seed Orchard Petty Cash Account; an audit of the Sand Hills State Forest Cone Collection Account; an audit of the Niederhof Seed Orchard Petty Cash and Cone Collection Account; a follow-up audit of the Sand Hills State Forest Cone Collection Account; a follow-up audit of the Niederhof Seed Orchard Petty Cash and Cone Collection Account; an audit of the Pee Dee Region Petty Cash Account; a follow-up audit of the Forest Renewal Program; year-end physical inventories of stocked uniforms and shop supplies in all relevant locations.

In addition, numerous memorandums were prepared and submitted to Management noting various issues that warranted attention.

The Internal Audit Department was also aware and involved where applicable in reviews performed by internal and/or external sources. For example, the Forest Management Section performed internal reviews in the Sumter and Walterboro Areas. External reviews were performed by State Fleet Management at Sand Hills State Forest and Manchester State Forest. The State Auditor's Office performed an audit of the agreed upon Procedures for Fiscal Year 1997 - 1998.

RECORDS MANAGEMENT

The Internal Audit Department oversees the Records Management System for the Commission. The Internal Auditor serves as Records Officer. Twenty-nine Record Liaison Officers were selected based on the organizational structure of the Commission. The Records Officer is responsible for training the Record Liaison Officers. Such training is performed periodically to ensure consistency and continuity. In May 1999 the Records Officer led a formal training session on Records Management.

During Fiscal Year 1998 - 1999, a Records Management Policy and Procedure was prepared, approved, and distributed. A Records Management Manual was also developed and distributed to applicable personnel.

Our efforts in Records Management have been recognized by the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. The Commission received the Innovation Award for Using Total Quality Management to develop and implement an effective records management program. Rodger E. Stroup, Director of the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, presented this award to the Records Officer and State Forester on May 11, 1999.

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INFORMATION AND EDUCATION

The Information and Education Department includes Information Services, Environmental Education, and Harbison State Forest.

INFORMATION SERVICES

Information Services produces audio-visual and print material for use by schools, Forestry Commission personnel, and the public in general for both educational and training purposes. The department handles public information about forest management subjects and maintains an Internet website. Information Services is also responsible for internal communication in the form of a quarterly, tabloid-sized newsletter and a weekly electronic news bulletin.

Internet Website

The Forestry Commission's website at http://www.state.sc.us/foresthas been expanded and updated since we went online in 1997 to include comprehensive forestry information and information about the Commission's services. Categories for search include Fire/Outdoor Burning, Forest Recreation, Forest Management, Forest Products, SCFC Facts and Facilities, Environmental Education, Reference Resources, and Bulletin Board. Entire publications are available online, such as the BMP guidelines for forestry practices in SC and its supplement on treatment of braided streams, SC's Smoke Management Guidelines, and the Forest Fire Law Handbook.

The website is a research tool for students of forestry. It is a reference for users of our services, with complete lists of county forestry personnel, outdoor burning information and relevant phone numbers, grant application information, seedling and services prices and ordering information, and location and trail maps for the state forests. It is a continually updated source for fire weather and current news. And it provides convenient links to related online resources. During fiscal 98-99 the site was visited 98,509 times.

Exhibits

Exhibit Venues

Print

Best Management Practices Braided Streams Supplement
Smoke Management Guidelines-revision
Southern Pine Beetle Incident Maps- booklet
SC Forestry Commission Strategic PlanManchester State Forest OHV Trail Guide
Harbison Trail Guide- revision
Tree Care-reprint

Video

CD-ROM

Training

Furniture/Signs

Improvements

19 News Releases
1 Op. Ed. Article carried by 10 newspapers
17 media interviews, forest management subjects

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION

It is the responsibility of the Environmental Education Coordinator to plan, develop, support, and coordinate the Forestry Commission's environmental education effort. The Coordinator oversees the development of Harbison State Forest's Environmental Education Center and serves as State Coordinator of Project Learning Tree (PLT) which is an international environmental education program designed for students in pre-kindergarten through high school. Last fiscal year SC PLT conducted 44 educator workshops throughout the state to train 891 teachers, and two facilitator workshops or reunions that trained 33 facilitators. PLT provided 8 exhibits and/or presentations at various functions across the state, reaching approximately 2300 participants. The Coordinator also represents the Commission on the Coalition for Natural Resource Education and various other committees involved with environmental education throughout the state.

The Assistant Environmental Education Coordinator was instrumental in assisting the training and conducting of this year's state Envirothon competition. The Envirothon is a program to help high school students learn more about our natural environment. The Envirothon tests students' knowledge of such topics as soils, water resources, forestry, wildlife, and current issues. The Assistant Coordinator matched Commission employees with high school teams in their areas, conducted training sessions for teachers, and coordinated the forestry portion of the competition and test. The Assistant Coordinator is also organizing the Wood Magic Forest Fair for October 1999 which will involve 700 to 800 students and teachers.

The Forestry Commission is instrumental in organizing the SC Teachers' Tour Coalition, an association of forest industry representatives and state and federal agencies, which conducted the SC Teachers' Tour in the Columbia-Sumter area in June. This successful tour provided 34 teachers with a first-hand experience of the forest industry and forest management, and provided them with training, resources and information to conduct lessons dealing with sustainable forestry.

The Forestry Commission continues to be a strong supporter of the Coalition for Natural Resources' environmental education efforts throughout the state. Sixteen foresters are trained to help conduct Teaching KATE (Kids About The Environment) environmental education lessons in forestry at Camp Long in Aiken County and Camp Cooper in Clarendon County.

Harbison Environmental Education Forest

Harbison Environmental Education Forest, located within the city limits of Columbia, contains 2,177 acres. The tract is being managed as a public greenspace to emphasize environmental and forestry education, demonstrate forest management practices, and serve as a forest recreational area. The forest is open seven days a week, with estimated annual attendance of 75,000 - 80,000.

Harbison's education staff and other SCFC employees conducted a total of 70 programs serving 4463 participants. Fifty-six programs were conducted at Harbison for 2312 participants, and 14 programs were conducted elsewhere, for 2151 participant.

Harbison continues to offer support to the Scouting community. Thirteen Cub Scout programs, two Girl Scout programs, and two Boy Scout forestry merit badge programs were held at Harbison. Approximately 321 scouts and their leaders participated in these programs. Scouts use the facilities on the Forest for camping and other activities. They also give back to the Forest six Eagle Scout projects were conducted this year. Scouts built one trail bridge and one 40-foot boardwalk. They installed four trail benches, planted 1,500 seedlings, and constructed and installed three firewood shelters as they worked to fulfill Eagle Scout requirements. The Assistant Environmental Education Coordinator worked with an Eagle Scout group to meet the requirements for the Hornaday Silver Medal.

The Harbison Environmental Education center is a 5000 square foot log building containing three offices, a small conference room, a screened porch, a deck and a 100-seat conference room. The Center is offered free to groups or agencies conducting environmental education workshops or classes. Twenty such meetings were held at the Center free of charge and the Forestry Commission used the facility for 47 meetings. Ninety-six other groups used the facility for a fee. A total of 166 meetings were held in the Environmental Center with 5106 participants. This activity generated an income of $14,175.

Harbison State Forest contains over 15 miles of roads and trails for bicycling, hiking, jogging, and nature study. A permit system for recreational users requires bicyclists to pay a user's fee and promotes donations from other users. Harbison sold 921 bike permits for an income of $10,510 and received $718 in donations. The Gazebo and Eagle Shelter were used frequently by school groups and other visitors. Fifty-one groups used these facilities, with 4046 total attendees. Among these were 28 paying groups, which generated an income of $810, and 55 educational groups that were not charged a fee.

Access to the Broad River is now possible due to a canoe landing on Middle Creek. Harbison staff cooperated with the River Alliance, utilizing funds from Richland County, to construct a 2100-foot access road and a step-down canoe landing. Since its completion 75 float plans have been filed for approximately 256 participants. The Forestry Commission is also cooperating with DNR law enforcement personnel and the Columbia Fire Department to facilitate public rescues. One such rescue of paddlers in a capsized canoe was carried out by DNR and fire department personnel in fiscal 98-99.

A handicapped accessible trail along the Historic Tree Grove, and a handicapped accessible restroom at the Eagle parking lot/Historic Tree Grove entrance was built with a grant obtained from SC PRT. Included in this project were the building of a new connecting trail from the West Firebreak Trail to the Stewardship Trail and the development of interpretive signage explaining forestry practices along the Stewardship Trail. Volunteers from the Boy Scouts, local biking groups, and Harbison employees worked to complete these projects by October 1998.

A working sawmill and a steam loader were donated to Harbison and are currently being installed on the grounds surrounding the Environmental Education center. These structures, along with a short fire tower and outdoor classrooms will complement the educational facilities and mission of the Center.

Forest Management

Two timber sales were conducted on Harbison State Forest. Both were negotiated sales, one removing 33.39 cords of pine at $50 per cord for a total of $1670.50 from a safety zone near the headquarters radio tower. The other sale was the removal of trees along the canoe landing right-of-way, as well as the removal of scattered trees in a former SPB spot. This sale involved 10 cords of hardwood at $15 per cord, for a total of $150. It also included 22.3 cords of pine at $50 per cord, for a total of $1115, bringing the total amount received for this sale to $1265.

Twenty-three percent of receipts from forest product sales and user fees are paid to Richland County for use by Richland/Lexington school systems. This year the county received $3,721.

Statewide Information and Education Activities
Exhibits 79
News releases/articles 125
Interviews:
Television
159
Newspaper 184
Radio 65
Parades 74

Forestry Commission personnel in Region and Area offices participated in approximately 856 educational programs attended by some 44,113 people.

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