1997 Annual Report
South Carolina Forestry Commission
July 1, 1996 - June 30, 1997

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Forestry Commissioners and Administration

Mission

FIELD OPERATIONS SUPPORT

FOREST MANAGEMENT

URBAN FORESTRY
FOREST STEWARDSHIP
MANCHESTER STATE FOREST
SAND HILLS STATE FOREST
STATE LANDS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

NURSERIES AND TREE IMPROVEMENT

FIRE MANAGEMENT

INSECT AND DISEASE

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

EQUIPMENT

ADMINISTRATION

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

PROCUREMENT

SAFETY/ TRAINING

ECONOMIC AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

INTERNAL AUDIT

INFORMATION AND EDUCATION


STATE COMMISSION OF FORESTRY

Members of the Commission:

Lawrence J. Bloomer, Chairman, Easley

G. Edward Muckenfuss, Vice Chairman, Summerville

Boris Hurlbutt, Walterboro

Joe P. Simpson, Lancaster

George E. Callaway, Manning

Joel R. Thrift, Westminster

David B. Smith, Conway

Sara Lee Simons, Florence

Dr. Constantine Curris, Clemson University, Clemson

 

Administration

J. Hugh Ryan, State Forester and Secretary to the Commission

H. Gilbert Brown, Deputy State Forester

Dean Carson, Technical Assistant to the State Forester

Judy J. Weston, Executive Assistant to the State Forester

Wray E. Freeman, Division Director, Field Operations Support

Joe M. Richbourg, Division Director, Administration

Table of Contents


Mission  
The mission of the South Carolina Forestry Commission is to protect, promote, enhance, and nurture the forest lands of South Carolina in a manner consistent with achieving the greatest good for its citizens.

The Commission will utilize Total Quality Management concepts in meeting its responsibilities.

Responsibilities extend to all forest lands, both rural and urban, and to all associated forest values and amenities including, but not limited to, timber, wildlife, water quality, air quality, soil protection, recreation, and aesthetics.

The Forestry Commission shall have general and specific responsibilities for the promulgation and enforcement of laws and regulations related to protection of the forest and its associated values.

The Commission shall be responsible for promoting and developing the appropriate technologies to accomplish its objectives, and for the development and promulgation of Best Management Practice Guidelines for South Carolina's forest land.

Table of Contents


FIELD OPERATIONS SUPPORT

 

The Field Operations Support Division provides operational and technical staff direction to the Forestry Commission field organization in each of the major program areas of forest management, nurseries and tree improvement, forest insects and diseases, forest fire protection, and environmental management. Additionally, it provides oversight to the equipment and communication needs of the agency including operations of the central shop.

 

FOREST MANAGEMENT

The Forest Management Section assists South Carolina citizens with management and development of the forest resources of the state. Programs include Woodland Management Assistance, Reforestation Assistance, Forestry Services, Forest Products Utilization and Marketing Assistance, Resource Conservation and Development, Urban Forestry, and Watersheds. These programs assist owners in growing more timber, aid industries in more efficient utilization of the timber resource, and foster conservation and multiple use of the forest resource.

There are 12.4 million acres of commercial forest land in South Carolina. According to the 1993 U.S. Forest Service Survey, 72% of the land is owned by farmers and miscellaneous private owners. Forest industry owns approximately 19% with 9% in public ownership.

The Forest Management programs are designed to assist the non-industrial private landowner with multiple-use forest management.

The Forest Management Section also has oversight responsibilities for the management of Sand Hills, Cassatt, and Manchester State Forests. Technical assistance is also provided to other state agency lands upon request.

Forest Management Assistance

Professional foresters from the Forestry Commission provide forest management advice and assistance to landowners. The land is examined and a written forest management plan is prepared. Recommendations for management may include such silvicultural practices as forest protection, reforestation, harvesting, prescribed burning, wildlife habitat improvement, and recreation. This year 2,594 management plans were prepared for 167,936 acres.Where practical, the landowner is referred to consulting or industrial foresters to assist in carrying out management recommendations. This year 448 cases were referred to consulting foresters and 287 to industrial foresters.

Forest Renewal Program (FRP)

In 1982 the program was funded for the first time by a $100,000 state appropriation. This permitted an assessment of $400,000 from forest industry, and created a $500,000 Forest Renewal Fund. The funding was doubled effective July 1, 1996 increasing the program to $1,000,000.

Forestry Incentive Program (FIP) - Federal

FIP funding for fiscal year 1996-97 was $491,100. Since 1974, $21,812,419 have been allocated to South Carolina landowners under FIP.

Agricultural Conservation Program (ACP) - Federal

The Agricultural Conservation Program was not continued with the 1996 Farm Bill. The figures in the table below refer to completion of previously obligated funds.

 

Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) - Federal

The Program began with crop year 1986 and was renewed with the passage of the 1990 Farm Bill. Thirteen signups have been held with 224,047 acres approved for trees. This year 947 acres were planted. The CRP program has been renewed with the 1996 Farm Bill.

 

Hurricane Hugo Reforestation Project

The Hugo Incentive Program (HIP) was established and funded with $6.0 million federal dollars ($3.0 million initial funding plus $3.0 million more in Spring 1992.) HIP is unique in that federal monies are being administered and allocated by a state agency. Further, the SCFC is using the Dire Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act funding to operate the cost share program. Therefore, all of the $6 million is available to assist non-industrial private forest landowners. The entire $6 million is now spent or designated for applicants. The HIP program expired on June 30, 1997.

STATEWIDE ACCOMPLISHMENTS ALL COST SHARE PROGRAMS
REFORESTATION AND TIMBER STAND IMPROVEMENT

ProgramNo. of
Landowners
Acres
Planted
Natural
Regeneration
TSI AcresCost Share
Payments
FRP274 8,833 0 1,459 $686,073
FIP37111,2501041,901$708,492
ACP 278 4,857 36 424 $229,911
CRP 69 947 0 32 $41,644
HIP 89 4,333 357 957 $422,965
SIP 41 1,421 0 388 $99,774
Total 1,122 31,641 497 5,161 $2,188,859

Seedling Survival

A total of 520 survival checks were made using a row count or tenth acre plot method for determining survival. A weighted analysis involving all survival checks was used to determine the statewide survival of 79%.

RegionPlanting Jobs
Inspected
Weighted Percent
Survival
Coastal16276%
Pee Dee17279%
Piedmont18680%
Total52079%

FOREST MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE 1996 - 1997
                      Non Cost-Share        Cost-Share        Forest Stewardship
County              Exams     Acres     Exams      Acres     Exams       Acres
=============================================================================
ABBEVILLE             17     1,144.0      32       954.0        1        68.0
AIKEN                 51     2,328.0      34     2,790.0        3       644.0 
ALLENDALE             14     1,046.0      21     1,288.0        3       433.0 
ANDERSON              34     4,881.0      21     1,847.0        2       124.0 
BAMBERG                5       339.0      36     1,722.0        2     1,531.0 
BARNWELL              19     1,413.0      17     1,098.0        6     2,065.0 
BEAUFORT               6       439.0       8       490.0        3     1,286.7 
BERKELEY              19     2,212.0      16     1,143.0        5       860.0 
CALHOUN                8       893.0      25     1,765.0        1        42.0 
CHARLESTON, UPPER     13       997.0       3       194.0        1        29.0 
CHARLESTON, LOWER     16     1,401.0       6       155.0        5       308.0 
CHEROKEE              32     1,914.0       4       240.0        0         0.0 
CHESTER               19     1,768.0      49     2,590.4        0         0.0 
CHESTERFIELD          10     1,280.5      46     2,851.7        0         0.0 
CLARENDON             36       803.0      47     1,886.0        2       288.0 
COLLETON              22     2,964.0      24     1,244.0        3       290.0 
DARLINGTON            36     1,524.0      30     1,237.0        0         0.0 
DILLON                13     1,061.0      39     1,489.0        0         0.0 
DORCHESTER            17     1,161.0      15       599.0        2       152.0 
EDGEFIELD             37     2,514.0      36     2,256.0        0         0.0 
FAIRFIELD             13       881.0      33     1,880.5        0         0.0 
FLORENCE              26     1,101.0      55     2,637.0        8       667.0 
GEORGETOWN            11     1,536.0      30     1,851.0        2     2,894.0 
GREENVILLE            44     1,451.5       7       177.0        0         0.0 
GREENWOOD             26     5,112.0      14       791.0        0         0.0 
HAMPTON               33     1,916.5      64     3,047.8        5     1,773.0 
HORRY                 49     4,344.0      61     1,977.0        2       385.0 
JASPER                14       826.5      19       712.5        4       410.0 
KERSHAW               13     1,301.0      26     1,133.0        1       215.0 
LANCASTER             30     2,833.0      15       973.0        5       524.0 
LAURENS               24     1,762.0      33     2,021.0        1        45.0 
LEE                   15     2,076.0      14     1,175.0        0         0.0 
LEXINGTON             36       986.0       9       254.0        0         0.0 
McCORMICK             17     1,340.0      11       655.0        1        84.0 
MARION                19     1,075.0      31     1,068.0        1       243.0 
MARLBORO              27     1,446.0      49     1,086.0        2       799.0 
NEWBERRY              25     2,653.0      32     1,314.0        1       144.0 
OCONEE               101     6,566.0       3        69.0        1        80.0 
ORANGEBURG            25     1,579.0      77     2,983.0        1        45.0 
PICKENS               33     1,191.0       8       489.0        0         0.0 
RICHLAND              31     2,131.0       5       401.0        3       715.0 
SALUDA                15       682.0      50     2,269.0        0         0.0 
SPARTANBURG           40     2,290.0      15       692.0        1        98.0 
SUMTER                13       784.0      14       897.0        0         0.0 
UNION                 16     1,255.0      15     1,151.0        0         0.0 
WILLIAMSBURG          34     1,976.0      91     4,288.0        2       166.0 
YORK                  56     2,877.0      14       644.0        0         0.0 
============================================================================== 
State Totals       1,210    86,054.0   1,304    64,474.9       80    17,407.7 


Forest Services

Through this program the Commission provides assistance to landowners and other state agency lands with afforestation, reforestation, and maximization of production from their woodlands. The landowner is charged the cost of all services performed.
These services were available to landowners during the year:

--Firebreak Plowing - performed by Forestry Commission employees using agency equipment for $75 for the 1st hour and $50 for each additional hour.

--Prescribed Burning - performed by Forestry Commission employees using agency equipment for $12 per acre for the 1st 50 acres, $10 per acre for the 2nd 50 acres and $8/acre for all over 100 acres. Firebreak plowing costs are not included. Minimum fee $100.00.

--Prescribed Burning Standby- an agency tractor and employee on standby at burning site while landowner performed burning under an approved plan for $45 for the 1st hour and $20 for each additional hour. Minimum fee $100.00.

--Equipment Rental Program - agency owned tree planters, bedding plows and drum choppers made available to private landowners at rates from $4 to $15 per acre.

--Timber Marking - performed by Forestry Commission employees at the rate of $5 per thousand board feet and $2.00 per cord.

Service# TractsUnits of
Measure
Receipts
Received FY 96-97
Firebreak Plowing7131,698 miles$130,653
Prescribed Burning17111,277 acres$106,293
Prescribed Burning Standby442,572 acres$6,480
Equipment Rental43792 acres$12,297
Water Bar Construction20499 bars$8,200
Timber Marking275,650 cords
1,931,647 bd. ft.
$27,461
Total Dollars1,018 $291,384


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URBAN FORESTRY

Urban forestry seeks to improve the quality of life in populated areas by providing direct technical assistance to communities and by working through partnerships with other organizations to protect and improve the management of urban tree resources. Clean air, clean water, improved aesthetics, increased property value, noise buffering, energy conservation, and public safety are some of the products of these endeavors.

Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program

The Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program is a national program funded by Congress through the U.S. Forest Service. South Carolina received $149,100 in base funding to provide technical assistance and training. Pass-through grants in the amount of $263,000 were provided to county and local governments, non-profit organizations, and educational institutions to develop long-lasting urban forestry programs in their communities.

Partnership Development and Educational Programs

Through the technical assistance and the grant funds, the urban program strives to develop partnerships with a variety of organizations and units of local government. Often these partnerships result in educational programs about the benefits and importance of urban forest resources. During FY97, the Forestry Commission developed partnerships with 232 other organizations and presented 98 educational sessions to almost 6,313 participants.

 

Technical Assistance

Three full-time urban foresters provide technical assistance on a regional basis in the Piedmont, Pee Dee, and Coastal regions of the state. Other Commission foresters provide urban forestry assistance in their respective areas on a time available basis. A full-time Grants Administrator works in the Columbia Office along with the Urban Forestry Coordinator for statewide program management.

Types of Technical AssistanceNon-Grant Through
Forestry Commission
Technical Assistance
Grant Program
Accomplishments
by Grantees
Program Development/Expansion145NA
Program Management44NA
Urban Forest Cultural Practices760NA
Trees Inventoried
Miles
1190
Total Trees Inventoried41011,764
Trees Planted
Seedlings/Whips/Saplings
3,155592
Street/Park Size40381
Trees Maintained71,089
Trees Protected
Local Ordinances Passed/Revised
01
Demonstration Planting Projects710

Tree City USA

Sponsored by the National Arbor Day Foundation, TREE CITY USA is administered in South Carolina by the Forestry Commission. The program seeks to stimulate and promote the management of urban trees by recognizing towns and cities which meet the following criteria: (1) expenditure of at least two dollars per capita on tree care and planting, (2) establishment of a city tree ordinance, (3) a legally constituted Tree Board, and (4) observance of Arbor Day by a mayor's proclamation and official ceremony. South Carolina ranks 28th nationally with 27 towns recognized as TREE CITY USA.

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FOREST STEWARDSHIP

The Forest Stewardship Program is a cooperative effort between the USDA Forest Service, Forestry Commission and natural resource agencies and organizations in South Carolina to encourage the long-term stewardship of non-industrial private forest lands. Landowners are provided technical assistance by having a multiple resource management plan developed for their property addressing their management objectives.

As of June 30, 1997, 1,894 requests covering over 518,853 acres have been received from landowners wanting to participate in this program. Natural resource professionals have completed 1,742 plans on 484,205 acres.

 

Stewardship Incentive Program

Once landowners have an approved Stewardship Management Plan, they may be eligible to participate in the Stewardship Incentive Program (SIP). This is a federal cost-share assistance program to provide financial incentives to private landowners to carry out some of the management practices outlined in their Stewardship Management Plan.

South Carolina has received a total of $1,840,511 for cost-share assistance under the Stewardship Incentive Program (SIP) through FY 1997. As of June 30, 1997, landowners have received $1,377,078 in SIP cost-share assistance payments by completing approved practices.

SIP Accomplishments From Inception To 6/30/97

PracticeActive
Requests
Acres
Treated
Cost-Share
Earned
Unfunded
Need
SIP 2 Reforestation2379,858$739,752$338,358
SIP 3 Forest Improvement533,364$93,848$16,504
SIP 4 Windbreak20$0$1,613
SIP 5 Soil & Water441,958$40,963$13,548
SIP 6 Riparian & Wetland421$14,079$10,000
SIP 7 Fish Habitat26$2,408$1,500
SIP 8 Wildlife Habitat2597,122$470,894$80,816
SIP 9 Recreation13159$4,876$14,831
Total61422,488$1,377,078$477,170

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MANCHESTER STATE FOREST

Manchester State Forest, located south of Wedgefield in Sumter County, is currently comprised of approximately 23,745 acres, 4,413 acres of which was recently acquired through purchase or quit claim deed in 5 separate transactions. From 1939 to 1955, Manchester was leased by the State of South Carolina from the federal government and managed by the South Carolina Forestry Commission. The State received title to the property on June 28, 1955.

Receipts

Receipts For Operating Budget:
Timber Sales - 530,430 bd.ft., 1,681 cords $327,098.58
Pinestraw Sales $ 33,674.30
Wildlife (WMA) $ 24,734.90
Land Leases (includes crop payments) $ 1,784.50
Use Permit Sales $ 8,443.10
Total$395,735.38

Note: $98,933.85 (25% of all forest receipts) paid to Sumter county.

Timber sales were concentrated on thinnings in overstocked stands and conversion of older slash pine stands to longleaf plantations.

Silvicultural Practices

Site preparation by drum chopping, chemical application, burning debris, V-blade and various combinations of the above was completed on 653 acres. These areas included stands that were previously understocked and therefore clearcut. Old agricultural fields were also planted making the total areas artificially regenerated 793 acres.

The following species and number of trees were planted:
Improved Coastal Loblolly Pine35,000
Containerized Longleaf Pine178,000
Bareroot Longleaf Pine227,500
Total Trees Planted440,500

A total of 453 acres were prescribed burned for site preparation, wildlife habitat enhancement, hardwood control and litter reduction. Weather and smoke management guidelines were a limiting factor in the completion of the proposed schedule of burning.

Forest Protection

Two wildfires occurred on Manchester this year burning a total of 3 acres. Firebreaks were maintained on those areas that were either high risk or high value.

Recreation/Education

Recreational use of the forest continues to escalate. Hunting, fishing, horseback riding, motorcycle/ATV riding and mountain biking continue to be favorite activities. Work has begun to GPS, remap and relocate, if necessary, all trails on Manchester. A restroom facility was installed at the day use parking lot with plans to complete the entire parking lot project by summer's end, 1997.

Use permits were implemented and became mandatory beginning in January, 1997 for all trail riding to include horseback riding, biking, motorcycle/ATV riding and use of the rifle and pistol range. Receipts from the sale of 517 permits exceeded $8,400.

The rifle and pistol range continues to be popular with a total of 1,211 free use permits issued between July 1, 1996 and January 1, 1997. After January 1, 1997 permits were sold for use of the range with a total of 668 visits. The range is staffed by one temporary employee and approximately 40 volunteers.

Five educational programs were conducted by the forest staff and area personnel with approximately 120 individuals involved. Of this 120 , 18 were visitors from mainland China. Two training sessions were also held at Manchester for SCFC personnel; one of which was bog training for area wardens, and the other was an S-211 water handling course which included SCFC employees from all regions of the state.

Eight special use permits were issued for organized events with approximately 2,400 participants.

Wildlife Management

Approximately 16,000 acres of the forest are included in the Wildlife Management Area Program through a cooperative agreement between the Department of Natural Resources and the South Carolina Forestry Commission. Technical assistance with game food plot establishment, monitoring deer herd dynamics, tracking various nongame and game species, pond management, and law enforcement on the forest is provided through interagency cooperation.

Planting and maintenance was conducted on 194 acres of wildlife areas. Corn, sunflowers, sorghum, browntop millet, quail mix, wheat, rye, clover, vetch and bicolor were utilized to diversify the food supply. Several of these species were donated by the Department of Natural Resources and planted by the Manchester and DNR personnel.

Cluster sites of the red cockaded woodpecker continue to be monitored along with scouting for new cavity and start trees in cooperation with biologists from the neighboring Poinsett Gunnery Range.

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SAND HILLS STATE FOREST

Sand Hills State Forest, located in Chesterfield and Darlington Counties, contains 46,000 acres. The forest was operated under a Lease from the federal government from 1939 until 1992 at which time title was transferred to the Forestry Commission.

Receipts
Timber sales, Pine straw, WMA payment,
Land lease payments, miscellaneous
$1,246,369.28
Note: 25% of all forest receipts are paid to Chesterfield and Darlington Counties.

Silvicultural Practices

Site Prep: 1,219 acres
Plantings: 936 acres on Forest, 150 acres on Refuge
Prescribed Burning: 6,000 acres

Two hundred acres were treated with sludge to improve growth and pine straw production.
Five hundred and twenty acres of pine release done using Arsenal: 320 acres by ground application and 200 acres by aerial application.

Forest Protection

Ten wildfires burned 212 acres

Recreation

Cooper Black Trails are near completion
Pine Barrens Horse Trail under construction
Pine Barrens Wagon Trail complete except for signs
Deer hunting season extended to 4 weeks

Wildlife Management

A fifty acre dove field was improved

217 wildlife food plots, 1/4 to 1/3 acre in size, were planted in Chufa, Bahia, Sorghum, Clay Peas, Browntop Millet, Sunflowers, White Proso Millet, QU mix, Egyptian Wheat, Spring Fame Mix, Corn, Soybeans, Wildlife Pea and Dove, Cowpeas, Cattail Millet,Winter Peas, Dove Proso, Banquet Mix. Bicolor plots were bushhogged and fertilized.

Forty new acres have been cleared for more food plots.

Scent survey, Fox Squirrel survey, Turkey survey and Quail surveys were conducted.

Established wood duck boxes were monitored, cleaned, and repaired.

Mountain Pond was treated with Aqua-kleen to control weeds.

Lee Pond water control structure replaced.

1,000 Sawtooth Oaks were planted, 500 of them were covered with tree shelters provided by DNR.

Educational Activities

Sand Hills personnel conducted 5 programs in local secondary schools and universities.
Worked with Bowaters on a teacher recertification program for 30 teachers.
Two Boy Scout Eagle projects completed.
RCW research project continuing.
Sludge research project in conjunction with the Town of Cheraw continuing.
Longleaf regeneration research project with U.S. Forest Service is still ongoing.

Endangered Species

RCW work is still ongoing. Currently have 59 clusters with 239 active cavity trees, and 90 artificial cavities.

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STATE LANDS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

The state lands forest management program was created to provide professional forest management assistance to South Carolina state agencies that own timber lands. During fiscal year 1996-97, six agencies requested assistance from the state lands coordinator. The agencies and facilities were as follows:

Department of Natural Resources:
Webb Wildlife Center
James Ross Wildlife Management Area
Donnelley Wildlife Management Area
Palachucola Wildlife Management Area
Mason Wildlife Management Area
Gopher Tortoise Heritage Preserve
Santee Coastal Reserve
Department of Transportation:
Grover Borrow Pit


Department of Juvenile Justice:
Camp Sand Hills
S.C. Youth Alternatives (Piedmont Nursery)
Department of Corrections
Perry Correctional Facility
Evans Correctional Facility
Leath Correctional Facility
Allendale Correctional Facility
Wateree Correctional Facility
Turbeville Correctional Facility
Kershaw Correctional Facility
Lieber Correctional Facility
S.C. Research Authority
Clemson Research Park
Carolina Research Park


Wil Lou Gray Opportunity School

Timber Revenue

Seven state-owned tracts were marked or cruised for timber sales. The total volume sold was 2.2 million board feet and 2,370 cords of pine sawtimber and pulpwood which generated $745,263.00 in revenue for state agencies.

Silvicultural Practices

69 acres of longleaf pine planted on Palachucola Wildlife Management Area. 150 acres of prescribed burn carried out on Heritage Trust, Gopher Tortoise Preserve.

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NURSERIES AND TREE IMPROVEMENT

The South Carolina Forestry Commission operates Taylor Forest Tree Nursery (bareroot) at Trenton and Creech Containerized Greenhouse at Wedgefield for the production of seedlings for South Carolina landowners.

This year 17,577,440 seedlings were grown and 16,058,174 were shipped. South Carolina forest industries planted an additional 32,458,069 seedlings on company lands. A grand total of 99,438,594 seedlings were planted on 159,102 acres in the state during the year.

The Piedmont, Coastal and Sumter facilities continue to house White Pine, Virginia Pine, and a hardwood genetics program. Spartanburg, Sumter, Coastal and Taylor facilities are used as seedling distribution centers. Taylor is the only bareroot production facility.

Containerized Seedlings

Specialized needs exist for seedlings other than bareroot stock grown at the South Carolina Forestry Commissionís Taylor Nursery. To meet these needs, a triple bay greenhouse is maintained at Creech Seed Orchard in Wedgefield. Containerized seedlings, rooted cuttings and progeny test materials are grown at the greenhouse. The greenhouse and associated slathouses give the Commission the capacity to grow a million plus containerized seedlings annually. The greenhouse production was 1,335,440 for fiscal year 1996-1997.

Research

The South Carolina Forestry Commission continues cooperative research projects with Clemson University, Auburn University, and U.S. Forest Service. The Commission also maintains membership in the North Carolina State University Pine Tree Improvement Cooperative, the North Carolina State Hardwood Research Cooperative, and the Auburn University Southern Forest Nursery Management Cooperative.

Forest Tree Seed Collection Program

Each year the South Carolina Forestry Commission collects or purchases pine cones and other forest tree seed for seedling production. During the past year, Walnut, Baldcypress, Red Cedar, Yellow Poplar, and Longleaf Pine seed were either purchased or collected for future seedling production.

 

State Nurseries Seedling Production by Species 1996-97

Bareroot Seedlings

	Improved Coastal Loblolly Pine		4,200,000
	Improved Piedmont Loblolly Pine		6,450,000
	Improved Texas Loblolly			   30,000
	Longleaf Pine				4,000,000
	Improved Virginia Pine			  100,000
	Improved White Pine (2-0)		  130,000
	Baldcypress				   70,000
	Red Cedar				  130,000
	Yellow Poplar				      -0-
	Improved Sycamore			   54,000
	Black Walnut				   35,000
	Attaway Lespedeza			1,000,000
	Sawtooth Oak				   40,000
	Miscellaneous				    3,000
	__________________________________________________	
	Total					16,242,000

	White Pine (1-0) Not For Sale	200,000

Containerized Seedlings
(Creech Greenhouse)

	Improved Piedmont Loblolly Pine		      -0-
	Improved Coastal Loblolly Pine		      -0-
	Improved Virginia Pine			   12,000
	Improved Longleaf Pine			1,266,440
	Leyland Cypress				   44,000
	Carolina Sapphire			    8,000
	Clemson Greenspire			    5,000
	___________________________________________________
	Total					1,335,440
        ___________________________________________________________
	Grand Total				17,577,440

 

Tree Seedling Distribution by Landowner Classification

 

  1. Seedlings Planted in the State by Land Ownership:

Land Ownership

Percent of Total

Number of Trees Planted

 

1. Private Ownership

 

34

 

34,262,508

2. Christmas Tree Growers

<1

118,505

3. Forest Industry (Pulp & Paper)

33

32,458,069

4. Lumber

6

6,273,650

5. Forest Industry (Other Corp.)

21

21,747,087

6. Schools

<1

107,614

7. State Forest

<1

771,075

8. Other State Land

<1

212,140

9. Other Government Land

<1

49,180

10. Federal Land

3

3,358,640

11. Associations/Clubs

<1

80,126

Total

100

99,438,594

 

 

 

  1. Source of Seedlings Planted in the State:

 

  1. Nurseries in South Carolina
  2. South Carolina Forestry Commission (Includes Greenhouse)16,058,174
    Champion International10,576,993
    International Paper Company31,979,450
    Westvaco17,816,414
    Weyerhaeuser16,632,000
    Tall Pines 45,600
    Total93,108,631

  3. Nurseries Outside of South Carolina
Georgia Forestry Commission 45,000
Federal Paper Board -0-
Union Camp 1,060,385
International Forest Tree Seed Company 5,224,003
North Carolina Forest Service -0-
Georgia Pacific -0-
Total 6,329,963

Total Seedlings and Acres Planted in South Carolina

1929-1997 by County

 

County

Seedlings Planted
1996-97

Grand Total Planted
To Date 1929-97

Acres Planted
1929 - 6/30/97

ABBEVILLE

1,350,686

11,488,310

80,689

AIKEN

4,834,925

236,745,649

296,322

ALLENDALE

3,339,430

10,263,563

133,448

ANDERSON

825,995

52,191,665

73,862

BAMBERG

3,706,975

67,132,713

88,706

BARNWELL

4,214,752

32,395,670

172,454

BEAUFORT

188,044

27,812,227

37,272

BERKELEY

3,290,810

131,455,823

167,391

CALHOUN

1,006,374

49,200,754

64,981

CHARLESTON

2,806,534

52,812,728

71,228

CHEROKEE

762,300

34,160,362

41,739

CHESTER

1,438,549

85,256,043

130,522

CHESTERFIELD

2,565,856

146,667,956

176,206

CLARENDON

2,682,629

71,364,839

90,220

COLLETON

3,435,784

137,893,422

189,639

DARLINGTON

1,178,567

38,296,219

48,264

DILLON

1,435,689

33,530,708

40,776

DORCHESTER

1,123,367

86,393,801

105,970

EDGEFIELD

3,905,254

86,277,581

118,765

FAIRFIELD

2,237,065

115,294,874

145,127

FLORENCE

1,300,820

36,392,373

45,686

GEORGETOWN

4,143,476

147,382,249

186,310

GREENVILLE

923,857

30,822,268

36,521

GREENWOOD

2,078,080

93,321,341

108,248

HAMPTON

2,824,894

110,918,300

142,548

HORRY

1,088,940

80,067,135

94,205

JASPER

2,709,504

100,393,544

119 438

KERSHAW

2,202,478

189,961,944

225,160

LANCASTER

782,001

79,555,838

98,851

LAURENS

1,817,966

102,551,517

191,526

LEE

878,536

36,673,169

46,911

LEXINGTON

2,963,280

69,493,829

88,402

MARION

4,213,996

42,534,170

55,052

MARLBORO

1,166,441

60,800,694

77,178

MCCORMICK

787,417

53,427,690

71,884

NEWBERRY

1,265,682

94,275,762

125,133

OCONEE

727,245

38,624,952

42,799

ORANGEBURG

3,910,032

145,914,801

217,040

PICKENS

566,726

2,939,536

34,971

RICHLAND

946,025

30,868,117

83,262

SALUDA

3,684,066

59,911,040

85,426

SPARTANBURG

628,520

63,311,486

75,830

SUMTER

1,090,136

71,965,197

85,904

UNION

1,290,177

783,550,492

100,996

WILLIAMSBURG

4,425,540

113,731,612

156,326

YORK

788,435

64,408,932

78,920

MULTIPLE COUNTIES

3,904,739

122,369,353

201,416

 

TOTAL

 

99,438,594

 

3,746,436,500

 

5,137,958

 

Seedling Distribution 1927-1997

YEAR

TOTAL
STATE
NURSERIES

TOTAL
ALL
SOURCES

YEAR

TOTAL
STATE NURSERIES

TOTAL
ALL
SOURCES

1928-29

142,000

142,000

1961-62

71,892,420

83,844,470

1929-30

148,000

148,000

1962-63

56,191,241

64,201,541

1930-31

986,000

986,000

1963-64

51,445,597

62,423,597

1931-32

976,000

976,000

1964-65

49,009,893

60,683,493

1932-33

996,000

996,000

1965-66

42,310,685

56,529,185

1933-34

1,031,000

1,031,000

1966-67

48,575,190

69,597,590

1934-35

7,529,000

7,529,000

1967-68

39,970,136

58,812,136

1935-36

23,000,000

23,000,000

1968-69

29,529,285

51,453,285

1936-37

22,000,000

22,000,000

1969-70

31,415,430

49,202,630

1937-38

11,192,000

11,192,000

1970-71

31,939,880

54,540,880

1938-39

10,854,000

10,854,000

1971-72

23,677,925

41,357,225

1939-40

12,244,000

12,244,000

1972-73

30,977,800

45,239,100

1940-41

21,165,423

21,165,423

1973-74

28,443,000

42,305,500

1941-42

10,275,037

10,275,037

1974-75

40,081,500

55,996,500

1942-43

4,742,010

4,7420,10

1975-76

40,664,387

59,063,387

1943-44

5,662,608

5,662,608

1976-77

39,795,375

59,238,275

1944-45

1,962,600

1,962,600

1977-78

45,734,500

64,380,200

1945-46

6,402,255

6,402,255

1978-79

43,009,533

65,936,933

1946-47

1,962,600

1,962,600

1979-80

46,374,919

76,206,619

1947-48

11,356,990

11,356,990

1980-81

53,512,622

86,419,513

1948-49

30,388,775

30,338,775

1981-82

55,727,828

87,793,028

1949-50

29,501,955

29,501,955

1982-83

47,798,858

86,265,299

1950-51

20,615,315

20,615,315

1983-84

50,169,612

100,394,312

1951-52

16,619,000

19,619,000

1984-85

51,635,770

107,717,581

1952-53

22,035,850

32,246,298

1985-86

65,464,810

124,381,360

1953-54

36,210,100

42,852,314

1986-87

73,554,964

157,522,970

1954-55

35,373,025

45,182,255

1987-88

78,787,967

164,094,827

1955-56

34,413,550

42,931,755

1988-89

55,051,595

153,450,416

1956-57

55,753,600

69,658,736

1989-90

38,355,557

128,475,489

1957-58

60,846,200

93,369,084

1990-91

29,297,000

102,384,439

1958-59

123,985,000

166,351,000

1991-92

31,983,779

94,710,582

1959-60

147,146,365

187,516,418

1992-93

22,665,397

84,287,351

1960-61

145,609,075

158,330,575

1993-94

23,286,422

119,310,888

     

1994-95

16,153,974

90,333,823

     

1995-96

16,841,263

99,549,491

     

1996-97

16,058,174

99,438,594

TOTAL STATE NURSERIES: 2,430,459,621

TOTAL ALL SOURCES: 4,100,683,512

SEED ORCHARDS

Since 1963, the SC Forestry Commission has been a participating member in the NC State University Industry Cooperative Tree Improvement Program. Understanding that trees could be genetically improved, substantial gains have been and will continue to result in firm commitments to tree improvement programs. As tree improvement programs continue, new and greater challenges in accomplishing breeding and operational goals will become evident. All Loblolly Pine seedlings for the 1996-1997 planting season were from second generation genetically improved sources.


Creech Seed Orchard	       				Acres
        Genetic Diversity Archives                       25
	Coastal Loblolly (Disease Resistant)		  5
	Piedmont Loblolly (Disease Resistant)		  5
	Longleaf (1st Generation)			 12
	Virginia Pine (1st Generation)			  3
        Sawtooth Oak                                      2
	
	TOTAL						 52

Niederhof Seed Orchard
	Coastal Loblolly (2nd Generation)		 204
	Piedmont Loblolly (2nd Generation)		 118
	Longleaf Pine (1st Generation)			  30
	Third Generation Breeding Orchard		   2
	
	TOTAL						 354

Coastal Seed Orchard
	Sycamore					  4
	Sweetgum					  6
	Willow Oak (Seed Production)			  1.3
	Swamp Chestnut Oak				  1.2
	Green Ash					  3.3
	Red Maple					  1.3
	Southern Red Oak				  2.2
	White Oak					  1.9	

	TOTAL						  21.2

Piedmont Seed Orchard
	White Pine (1.5 Generation)			  12
	Northern Red Oak				   2
	Virginia Pine (1st Generation)			   3
	
	TOTAL						  17

	GRAND TOTAL ORCHARD ACRES			 444.2

Forest Tree Seedling Sales, Distribution by Species by County

County

Improved Coastal Loblolly Pine

Improved Piedmont Loblolly Pine

Improved Texas Loblolly Pine

Longleaf Pine

Sawtooth Oak

Yellow Poplar

Bald Cypress

Black Walnut

Sycamore

Improved White Pine

Improved Virginia Pine

Easter Redcedar

Sapphire

Greenspire

Leyland Cypress

Misc. Species

TOTAL

Abbeville

680,403

663,416

0

1,000

1,600

0

100

500

0

0

3,135

100

90

0

342

0

1,350,686

Aiken

3,492,619

705,916

4,000

576,035

2,300

0

2,400

2,600

100

4,100

7,815

1,600

72

54

414

34,900

4,834,925

Allendale

3,080,961

0

0

254,025

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

72

72

4,300

3,339,430

Anderson

36,774

782,019

0

0

1,000

0

100

300

200

1,000

950

700

396

54

2,502

0

825,995

Bamberg

3,050,161

583,416

0

64,500

300

0

0

500

0

0

90

1,100

0

0

208

6,700

3,706,975

Barnwell

3,283,161

561,416

0

350,630

600

0

200

1,500

0

1,000

5,100

200

0

0

270

10,675

4,214,752

Beaufort

120,000

0

1,000

61,575

100

0

200

2,500

100

100

645

600

108

90

1,026

0

188,044

Berkeley

3,032,594

0

0

105,830

1,600

0

700

100

0

200

135

300

90

90

288

148,883

3,290,810

Calhoun

436,794

533,916

0

29,350

100

0

600

0

100

0

1,500

3,600

54

54

306

0

1,006,374

Charleston

2,098,990

578,416

0

30,918

200

66,666

1,500

1,300

200

1,500

4,100

2,300

540

310

1,914

17680

2,806,534

Cherokee

0

756,416

0

90

1,000

0

0

0

100

1,500

1,500

1,100

0

252

342

0

762,300

Chester

241,074

1,192,041

0

0

1,100

0

0

0

0

1,500

1,500

0

0

0

1,334

0

1,438,549

Chesterfield

3,000

2,282,656

0

269,865

1,000

0

100

500

200

3,100

3,685

1,300

54

0

396

0

2,565,856

Clarendon

2,642,000

0

0

5,260

1,000

11,000

2,000

2,000

14,000

1,200

2,675

900

216

90

288

0

2,682,629

Colleton

3,248,477

0

0

92,055

600

0

600

0

0

0

1,000

1,000

0

0

252

91,800

3,435,784

Darlington

9,000

1,133,656

0

26,445

100

0

600

1,100

0

3,100

600

2,600

0

0

1,366

0

1,178,567

Dillon

315,500

1,107,256

0

7,005

0

0

1,000

0

0

1,600

90

2,500

360

18

360

0

1,435,689

Dorchester

1,029,268

0

0

29,045

0

0

100

1,000

0

100

5,500

200

738

540

1,116

55,760

1,123,367

Edgefield

3,171,719

709,916

0

500

2,300

0

100

0

2,100

600

3,645

13,600

216

180

378

0

3,905,254

Fairfield

614,262

1,621,416

0

45

800

0

0

0

0

0

100

100

0

0

342

0

2,237,065

Florence

128,000

1,132,156

0

34,370

400

0

2,400

100

0

500

100

2,200

0

0

594

0

1,300,820

Georgetown

3,961,445

0

0

2,115

0

70,000

100

600

66,666

0

0

0

18

18

288

42,226

4,143,476

Greenville

122,500

756,113

0

26,650

100

0

0

100

100

12,700

2,290

1,800

54

18

1,432

0

923,857

Greenwood

0

2,074,618

0

0

100

0

500

0

0

600

1,500

600

0

0

162

0

2,078,080

Hampton

2,756,066

0

0

66,210

1,000

0

0

0

0

0

500

1,100

0

0

18

0

2,824,894

Horry

1,045,000

0

0

28,770

300

0

0

100

500

4,500

6,590

2,100

90

126

864

0

1,088,940

Jasper

2,617,316

0

0

46,125

600

0

0

100

0

1,600

3,045

1,200

90

0

828

38,600

2,709,504

Kershaw

127,500

1,687,916

0

374,970

700

0

0

600

200

1,300

6,640

1,400

18

108

1,026

100

2,202,478

Lancaster

9,000

760,016

0

5,985

2,500

0

1,000

0

0

1,000

1,000

1,500

0

0

0

0

782,001

Laurens

0

1,810,636

0

45

1,200

0

0

0

0

2,400

1,555

600

126

18

1,386

0

1,817,966

Lee

90,000

733,916

0

51,000

300

0

100

1,000

0

100

500

0

0

0

1,620

0

878,536

Lexington

2,063,875

618,379

23,000

220,648

1,500

0

1,000

500

1,600

6,300

13,770

9,000

576

342

2,790

0

2,963,280

Marion

2,722,000

1,157,656

0

306,500

200

0

0

100

0

2,100

2,900

0

180

180

180

22,000

4,213,996

Marlboro

0

1,132,661

0

30,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,000

2,600

72

0

108

0

1,166,441

McCormick

0

785,917

0

0

500

0

0

0

0

500

500

0

0

0

0

0

787,417

Newberry

0

1,258,671

0

3,045

700

0

100

0

0

0

500

0

72

18

576

2,000

1,265,682

Oconee

0

696,416

2,000

7,375

1,700

0

0

700

0

6,700

10,000

1,500

140

54

660

0

727,245

Orangeburg

3,108,044

559,916

0

160,030

3,600

0

14,100

100

3,280

2,200

3,890

6,600

108

18

1,350

46,796

3,910,032

Pickens

0

539,916

0

500

1,400

0

600

0

600

17,900

1,140

2,600

54

54

1,962

0

566,726

Richland

0

794,416

0

64,010

3,600

100

4,900

400

50,100

2,100

7,585

16,100

252

144

2,318

0

946,025

Saluda

2,023,875

1,597,075

0

57,090

0

0

200

100

100

1,400

2,590

700

144

0

792

0

3,684,066

Spartanburg

0

597,749

0

90

3,000

0

1,200

1,200

700

10,200

5,135

6,500

180

198

2,368

0

628,520

Sumter

402,000

405,416

0

264,280

600

0

600

100

0

4,200

9,500

2,000

126

18

1,296

0

1,090,136

Union

0

1,288,441

0

0

500

0

0

0

0

700

0

500

0

0

36

0

1,290,177

Williamsburg

4,077,526

0

0

175,735

300

6,000

200

0

14,000

0

545

1,000

18

18

198

150,000

4,425,540

York

0

772,016

0

1,000

1,100

0

600

0

0

6,600

3,305

700

180

0

2,934

0

788,435

Multiple Co

845,000

2,997,416

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

20000

3,862,416

Out-of-State

0

0

0

10,675

1,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

29,500

0

0

0

0

41,175

Unknown

0

0

0

90

0

0

0

0

0

500

360

0

0

0

198

0

1,148

 

TOTAL

 

56,685,904

 

37,369,304

 

30,000

 

3,841,481

 

42,600

 

153,766

 

37,900

 

19,700

 

154,946

 

106,700

 

130,205

 

125,600

 

5,432

 

3,136

 

39,500

 

692,420

 

99,438,594

Table of Contents


FIRE MANAGEMENT

Area protected: 12,807,924 acres.
Based on 1993 Forest Survey data for non-federal forestland, plus 10% to cover adjacent non-forest land. Also included is 101,320 acres of federal land protected under special contract. Mutual aid is provided on 802,147 acres of additional federal land.

Fire Protection Cooperatives

The Forestry Commission has cooperative arrangements with 10 fire and emergency management entities. Activities for each cooperative during FY 1996-97 are as follows:

Southeastern States Forest Fire Compact Commission: SCFC dispatched 48 personnel equipped with tractors and chain saws to provide debris removal assistance to North Carolina immediately following Hurricane Fran.

SC Division of Emergency Preparedness: SCFC provided field support and EOC staffing as Hurricane Bertha and Hurricane Fran approached the SC coast. Staff foresters participated in several EPD emergency response training sessions during the year.

Wildland Fire Protection Partnership: SCFC produced and staffed the WFPP exhibit at the annual SC State Firemen's Association Annual Convention. SCFC personnel wrote and assisted in production and placement of three television spot announcements sponsored by the Partnership.

Rural Cooperative Fire Protection Program: Federal funds for this program have decreased significantly. During the year, 24 fire departments were approved for matching-fund grants totaling $13,000.

Federal Excess Property Program: 183 pieces of federal excess equipment were loaned to fire departments during the year. At present, 612 pieces of equipment are assigned to 293 departments statewide.

National Weather Service: NWS provides daily fire weather forecasts and atmospheric dispersion information. During the year, SCFC and NWS worked to improve content and timing of daily forecasts. In addition, NWS provided special spot weather forecasts during the Carver's Bay Fire (March, 1997).

USDA Forest Service: Under the terms of a 1996 contract, SCFC provides aerial wildfire detection on 611,407 acres of National Forest land and 198,000 of Savannah River Site land in SC.

DOD Corps of Engineers: Under a new agreement this year, SCFC began providing all fire suppression services on 55,320 acres of Corps of Engineers land. Under the terms of the agreement, actual fire suppression costs are reimbursed to the SCFC.

USDI Fish and Wildlife Service: Under the terms of a 1992 land acquisition agreement, SCFC provides initial attack fire suppression on the 46,000 acre Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge. The agreement terminates in 2042.

USDI Park Service: Agreement maintained; no reportable activity.

Fire Weather

Weather Stations. The Forestry Commission, USDA Forest Service, National Park Service, and USDI Fish and Wildlife Service have a network of 13 Automated Weather Stations across the state. Data from these stations are used in daily calculation of the Fire Danger Rating; special data from these stations are also provided to the National Weather Service. Weather readings from these stations are available 24 hours a day for wildfire and prescribed fire management purposes.

Inches Precipitation-FY 96*

Month Precipitation Normal Precipitation Departure from Normal
July 96 5.10 5.60 -0.50
Aug 5.25 5.57 -0.32
Sept 2.37 4.31 -1.94
Oct 2.75 3.15 -0.40
Nov 2.52 2.88 -0.36
Dec 2.88 3.60 -0.72
Jan 97 3.91 3.97 -0.06
Feb 4.60 3.90 +0.70
Mar 1.89 4.96 -3.07
Apr 4.93 3.37 +1.56
May 1.94 4.09 -2.15
June 9.02 5.22 +3.80
TOTAL 47.16 50.62 -3.46

Precipitation Last 5 Years*

Fiscal Year Precip. Inches Departure from Normal
1992-93 54.93 +4.60
1993-94 42.76 -7.57
1994-95 57.29 +4.69
1995-96 47.72 +4.62
1996-97 50.62 -3.46
5-Yr. Av. 50.66 +2.88
*measured by N0AA and SC Climatology Office

Readiness Plan
The daily readiness level of Forestry Commission firefighters is based on fire danger data, available number of firefighters, and status of firefighting equipment. Average statewide readiness levels for FY 97 are as follows:
Readiness 1 (No wildfire danger) 20 days
Readiness 2 (Low wildfire danger)282 days
Readiness 3 (Moderate wildfire danger) 48 days
Readiness 4 (High wildfire danger) 14 days
Readiness 5 (Extreme wildfire danger) 1 day

Burning Ban and Red Flag Fire Alert

A State Forester's burning ban was declared in coastal counties for July 11-12, 1996, due to high winds in advance of Hurricane Bertha. A Red Flag Alert was declared in the upper coastal plain March 11-14, 1997; a statewide Red Flag Alert was issued for March 31-April 4, 1997.

Dispatch

Forestry Commission dispatch is by closest available resource, regardless of political or administrative boundaries. Dispatching was handled by Region Dispatch Centers located in Walterboro, Florence, and Newberry.

Air Operations

Eight Forestry Commission pilots equipped with Federal Excess planes provided both fire detection and incident reconnaissance. Private aerial contractors trained in wildfire detection supplemented the agency's resources when needed. A combined total of 5,270 hours of aerial detection/suppression time was logged during the fiscal year.

Prescribed Fire

Certified Prescribed Fire Manager Program
Four Certified Prescribed Fire Manager Schools were conducted during the year. A total of 526 individuals have been certified as prescribed fire managers since the program's inception in 1994.

Prescribed Burning for Forestry, Wildlife, and Agriculture

Region

Forestry Understory

No. Acres

Forestry Site Prep

No. Acres

Wildlife

No. Acres

Agriculture

No. Acres

Coastal

2206

152,573

3214

20,059

681

55,772

6069

88,742

Pee Dee

810

55,763

211

10,661

183

21,595

4812

109,404

Piedmont

169

26,242

251

13,438

38

2,875

493

7,550

Totals

3185

234,578

3676

44,158

902

80,242

11,374

205,696

Grand Total Burning Under Smoke Management Guidelines: 19,137 fires; 564,674 acres.

Training

The Fire Management Staff conducted the following training during the year: Basic Firefighting School, Basic Firefighting School for Cooperators, Basic Prescribed Fire School, Basic Fire Information Officer Training, Basic Firefighter Training (S-130), Portable Pumps and Water Use (S-211), Intermediate Fire Behavior (S-290), and Introduction to Wildland Fire Behavior Calculations (S-390). The Fire Staff also designed and administered the agency's first Comprehensive Fire Examination.

Personnel from Federal agencies, local government, and other state agencies attended courses presented by the Fire Management Staff.

Law Enforcement

The Forestry Commission has 68 commissioned law enforcement officers, all certified by the Criminal Justice Academy. During the year, the .40 Glock pistol replaced the .357 revolver as the standard service weapon for Forestry Commission officers.

Law Enforcement Summary, Fiscal Year 97

County

or State Forest

Careless

Negligent

Intentional

Willfull and Malicious

Notifications

Precautions

 

Timber Theft

 

State Forest

 

Other

Burn
Site
Insp.

Investigations

Total

Fines
(dollars)

P C P C P C P C P C P C P C

Fire

Smoke
Mgt.
Timber
Theft

Violations

Prosecutions

Abbeville

2

1

       

1

2

           

9

4

1

 

10

3

238

Aiken

2

2

                       

0

13

 

3

80

2

94

Allendale

2

2

                       

0

23

   

15

2

125

Anderson

0

0

                       

0

2

   

8

0

Bamberg

2

2

           

1

0

       

7

25

 

4

40

2

250

Barnwell

6

6

       

2

2

           

1

18

 

2

27

8

560

Beaufort

5

4

       

2

2

           

13

45

   

98

7

285

Berkeley

4

4

   

2

2

14

14

       

2

2

24

38

2

 

240

21

3924

Calhoun

10

10

       

3

3

       

1

1

11

18

 

2

26

14

985

Charleston

1

1

       

5

5

           

7

37

   

32

6

263

Cherokee

0

0

       

1

1

           

0

1

1

 

1

1

50

Chester

0

0

                       

0

20

   

7

0

0

Chesterfield

12

12

       

2

2

           

24

29

14

 

56

14

1529

Clarendon

2

2

                       

3

7

1

1

84

2

200

Colleton

16

16

                       

3

46

 

3

140

16

705

Darlington

1

1

                       

2

4

1

 

33

1

0

Dillon

3

3

       

6

6

           

6

16

1

 

35

9

550

Dorchester

5

5

       

10

10

           

2

63

 

1

93

15

764

Edgefield

0

0

                       

7

4

12

 

2

0

0

Fairfield

2

2

           

1

1

       

4

9

2

 

9

3

100

Florence

0

0

   

1

 

3

3

           

6

28

9

1

29

4

56

Georgetown

3

3

       

5

4

           

10

34

1

 

59

8

537

Greenville

0

0

   

4

     

2

         

0

20

2

2

25

10

0

Greenwood

0

0

                       

15

1

1

1

17

0

0

Hampton

2

2

                       

8

30

   

51

2

94

Horry

3

3

       

9

9

           

12

11

6

 

44

12

695

Jasper

2

2

       

4

4

           

3

32

 

1

124

6

450

Kershaw

7

7

       

2

2

           

26

14

   

42

9

423

Lancaster

0

0

                       

0

0

   

42

0

0

Laurens

1

1

                       

10

1

2

 

1

1

30

Lee

0

0

                       

0

15

   

49

0

0

Lexington

48

28

           

4

3

       

44

44

20

6

46

39

2088

Marion

0

0

                       

1

1

   

12

0

0

Marlboro

3

3

                       

17

18

6

 

44

3

150

McCormick

0

0

                       

1

1

1

1

1

0

0

Newberry

0

0

                       

0

7

16

 

20

0

0

Oconee

3

3

                       

0

3

4

 

3

3

423

Orangeburg

11

11

       

6

6

3

2

       

11

78

6

24

177

17

1296

Pickens

19

17

                       

9

29

7

 

28

22

1222

Richland

2

2

   

1

1

2

2

           

6

5

1

1

9

5

300

Saluda

0

0

                       

16

3

1

 

6

0

0

Spartanburg

0

0

                       

0

2

 

3

3

0

0

Sumter

2

2

       

3

3

           

9

6

3

 

66

5

370

Union

0

0

                       

0

3

   

3

0

0

Williamsburg

8

7

   

2

1

8

8

           

0

115

2

 

223

18

977

York

5

3

                       

11

6

2

 

4

5

329

Manchester S.F.

0

0

               

7

6

           

7

7

472

Sand Hills S.F.

0

0

6

6

6

6

1283

Total

194

167

0

0

10

4

88

88

11

6

13

12

3

3

337

929

125

 

56

2134

307

$21,817

Acres Protected and Total Burning Notifications
CountyAcres
Protected
Notifications
Abbeville202,645 753
Aiken 455,540 1635
Allendale 178,794 606
Anderson 214,724 2218
Bamberg 182,062 644
Barnwell 147,093 838
Beaufort 136,739 997
Berkeley 390,299 1971
Calhoun 168,997 618
Charleston 244,835 1209
Cherokee 165,386 586
Chester 307,154 680
Chesterfield 350,594 1107
Clarendon 241,314 566
Colleton 502,776 1998
Darlington 206,641 647
Dillon 158,914 629
Dorchester 283,205 1258
Edgefield 238,766 858
Fairfield 409,985 491
Florence 322,779 1506
Georgetown 417,150 1146
Greenville 271,893 3249
Greenwood 212,203 972
Hampton 279,511 1322
Horry 492,064 2618
Jasper 329,574 1198
Kershaw 413,527 979
Lancaster 289,284 554
Laurens 325,714 1100
Lee 149,375 880
Lexington 280,985 2547
Marion 239,275 787
Marlboro 203,172 546
McCormick 140,099 294
Newberry 254,485 687
Oconee 226,058 1713
Orangeburg 438,154 2173
Pickens 233,056 1698
Richland 280,398
Saluda 203,906 455
Spartanburg 289,043 2470
Sumter 258,685 1191
Union 229,078 175
Williamsburg 450,241 1346
York 290,432 2178
Federal Land 101,320 -----

Total Burning Notifications Received at Dispatch Centers -------------------------------- 56,082

Total Yard Debris Burning Notifications From Statewide Automated Attendant----277,639

Grand Total All Notifications Received------------------------------------------------------333,721

Fires By Cause

Cause

Number

Acres

Burned

Average Acres
Per Fire

Percent of Total

1996-97

5 year average

Lightning

34

239.0

7.0

1.06

2.10

Campfire

8

30.2

3.8

.25

0.49

Smoking

80

193.4

2.4

2.50

3.09

Debris Burning

1135

8960.3

7.9

35.42

34.45

Incendiary

1323

10500.1

7.9

41.29

42.35

Equipment

208

557.4

2.7

6.49

5.40

Railroad

38

175.5

4.6

1.19

1.04

Children

183

324.4

1.8

5.71

5.07

Miscellaneous

195

750.4

3.8

6.09

6.01

TOTALS

3204

21730.7

6.8

100.00

100.00

Five Year Summary All Fires

Fiscal Yr.

Acres
Protected

Forest Land

Non-Forest Land

All Lands

Number
Fires
Burned
Acres
Number
Fires
Acres
Burned
Number
Fires
Acres
Burned
Av. Acres
per Fire
Acres Protected
% Burned

92-93

12,558,258

3,179

21,447.0

673

2,931.0

3,852

24,379.0

6.3

0.19

93-94

12,706,604

5,671

35,373.2

797

4,700.8

6,468

40,074.0

6.2

0.32

94-95

12,706,604

2,824

14,354.3

553

2,170.2

3,377

16,524.5

4.9

0.13

95-96

12,706,604

3,618

23,417.3

723

3,694.8

4,341

27,112.1

6.2

0.21

96-97

12,807,924

2,727

19,847.1

477

1,883.6

3,204

21,730.7

6.8

0.17

Five Year Average

3,604

22,887.8

645

3,076.1

4,249

25,964.1

6.1

0.20

TOTAL ALL LAND FIRES BY COUNTY AND MONTH, FISCAL YEAR 97
                 JULY        AUGUST      SEPTEMBER     OCTOBER     NOVEMBER     DECEMBER      JANUARY     FEBRUARY       MARCH        APRIL         MAY         JUNE          TOTAL  
              NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES   NO.   ACRES  
======================================================================================================================================================================================  
ABBEVILLE       5     7.5                              1      .1                              3     5.2                 2      .3   10    13.0    3     6.0                 24    32.1  
AIKEN           7     4.2    1     1.0    6    18.5    4     9.0    4     8.2    9    29.0   11    35.7   10    27.4   27   129.9   18   217.8   18    69.3    1      .1   116   550.1  
ALLENDALE                    1      .2                 4      .8                 4     4.6    3     4.5    4     2.1    9    17.1    3     3.9                              28    33.2  
ANDERSON        5    11.0    1     1.0                 3     3.5    1    12.0                 1      .6    2     4.5    6    27.0    5    38.5    2    39.0                 26   137.1  
BAMBERG         2      .2                 5    14.1    8    16.5    5     6.8    2     4.1    5    16.6   10    51.7   13    11.5    4    13.5    3    59.7                 57   194.7  
BARNWELL        5    31.0    2     1.8    3     6.3    3    14.0    1      .1                 4     6.5    4    18.8    1     2.1    6     7.2    1     2.0                 30    89.8  
BEAUFORT        5    32.0                              1    10.0    1      .1    6    24.0   22   127.5   12    90.0   40   293.8   18    33.2    2    25.0                107   635.6  
BERKELEY        7    18.7    4     2.1                 3     6.0    7    61.0   11    36.2   28   150.4   16    81.6   67  1146.0   46   446.7   22    94.8                211  2043.5  
CALHOUN         8     4.1                 2     6.1    2    17.0    2     7.5    2     5.5    7    18.9    6    11.5    6    33.0    2     5.0                 2     6.0    39   114.6  
CHARLESTON, L.  4     1.7                                                                     8    35.7    6     8.7   10    61.5   11    49.7    2     1.1                 41   158.4  
CHARLESTON, U.  3    51.0                              1     2.0                 1    15.0    6     7.1    6    22.5   14   148.6   11   175.7                              42   421.9  
CHEROKEE        8    13.3                              2     2.0                 1    10.0    4     8.6    2     7.0    3     4.3    5    24.5    2     2.0                 27    71.7  
CHESTER         9    45.5                                                                                  3     4.2    4     9.0                 4     5.1                 20    63.8  
CHESTERFIELD    4    53.2                              2     3.0    4    52.0    3    43.0   13    23.1   10    63.9   21   907.0   19    39.3   17    53.5    3     8.5    96  1246.5  
CLARENDON                    2     1.1    3     4.5    3     7.0   11    80.5    5    24.8   17    84.8    9    37.4   30   115.9   20    57.6    6    19.1    1     1.0   107   433.7  
COLLETON       12    33.1    2      .6    2      .2    6    11.4    5     6.3   17    36.9   26   113.2    9    12.4   47   339.9   21   110.1   15    43.3    3      .4   165   707.8  
DARLINGTON      2    13.0    1      .2    2     2.2    2     5.0    2     7.0    2     5.0    2    17.0    1     2.0   12    34.0   14    45.4   11     9.7    3    18.5    54   159.0  
DILLON          4    17.4                              2     6.1    2      .6                 1     2.0    5    29.2    8    39.0   12    42.2    6    67.6    2     3.0    42   207.1  
DORCHESTER     13   191.9                 2      .3    3     8.0    3     3.8   10    26.2   17    64.7   10    24.6   36   444.6   24   128.9    2     8.5    1     2.0   121   903.5  
EDGEFIELD                                                           1     5.0    1     4.0    2      .3    2     1.2    1      .3    1      .2                 5    21.2    13    32.2  
FAIRFIELD      12     7.4    2      .3    2      .3    4    16.2    1      .1    5      .6                 4     3.4   12     7.6    6     6.3    7    11.9                 55    54.1  
FLORENCE        5    41.2                              1     2.0    2    10.5    8    24.4    5     5.6    4    14.8   28   182.8   18    70.1   12   108.3    2      .5    85   460.2  
GEORGETOWN      1      .1                 1     1.5    2     7.0    3     4.2    5     7.0    3     5.1    5    18.0   30  3406.7   19   130.3    4    13.0    1      .1    74  3593.0  
GREENVILLE      3     4.0    1     1.0                 3     2.1    2     1.4    1     1.5    2     5.1    4     9.0    9    30.5    9    17.0    4    20.1    1     2.0    39    93.7  
GREENWOOD       5     2.8    1      .5                 1      .5    5    50.0    3     1.4    1      .2    2     1.5   11    23.0    2     8.0    4     4.5                 35    92.4  
HAMPTON         6     2.7                 2      .2    2     5.1    5     2.4    9     8.1    8    32.1    8    17.0   22    91.0   21    46.8    4     6.6    1     2.0    88   214.0  
HORRY           3     6.2                              3     5.7    3    20.0    5     9.0   11    39.1    4     6.4   30   211.6   18    60.0   10    42.9    2     3.3    89   404.2  
JASPER          5    69.4                 3     4.2    5    56.3    1     8.0    5    14.0   16    73.4   15    25.1   59   443.3   21   108.3    3    16.4    1     1.0   134   819.4  
KERSHAW         8     6.5                              4     5.2    1     1.0    2     2.0    7    16.0    5    41.5   16    56.5   10   500.5    8    39.5    6    16.6    67   685.3  
LANCASTER       8    17.9                                           1     1.0                 3    17.0                              2    11.0    4    14.0                 18    60.9  
LAURENS         2     2.0                              1      .5                              4     4.0    1     2.0    4     3.7    3     4.0    4     8.0    1     1.0    20    25.2  
LEE             5   100.0                 1      .1    1     1.5    7    28.7    1    35.0    5    55.5    1    30.0   23   249.4   15    71.2    8     8.0    4    65.0    71   644.4  
LEXINGTON      26    19.8    2     1.8    4      .5   11     7.2    5     5.2   17    40.2   11    23.8   11    23.5   20    59.1   33    36.0   38    62.3    4      .7   182   280.1  
MARION          1      .1                                           1      .2    1      .1    2     3.5                 8    51.2    2     2.7    2     1.2                 17    59.0  
MARLBORO        5     9.0                              1     5.0    2     1.1    6     5.9    3     4.8   13    32.8   15    48.9   10    34.0    5     2.6    4    38.2    64   182.3  
MCCORMICK       2      .4                 1      .1    1      .3    1      .5                              1     2.0    5     6.6    8    10.7    9     3.0                 28    23.6  
NEWBERRY        4     8.0    1      .4    2     1.0                              2      .3    2     4.0    2     2.0    3     6.0    3    14.5    4     7.5                 23    43.7  
OCONEE          2     2.0                 1      .1    1     1.0                              2     3.0    3     6.0    8    43.2    7    20.6    7    10.0                 31    85.9  
ORANGEBURG     12    35.0    5     1.8   17    33.4   22    24.0    3     4.1   12    66.7   34   473.7   26    52.5   59   399.4   19   101.2   12    24.1    1     1.0   222  1216.9  
PICKENS         1     1.5                              1      .5    2    40.2                 1     1.2                16    72.9    8    21.3   11    20.1                 40   157.7  
RICHLAND        4    31.0    1     5.0    1     2.0    2     5.0    2     3.5    2    27.0    5    32.0                 8    22.0    5    48.0    5    51.0                 35   226.5  
SALUDA          5     2.4                 2     4.0                 3     8.1                 2     2.1    1     3.0                 4     3.4    2      .3    2    12.0    21    35.3  
SPARTANBURG     8    13.0                              2     3.0    4     6.5                 2     3.0    2     8.0    5    13.0    4    30.0    1     5.0    1     1.0    29    82.5  
SUMTER          4    10.0                 2     3.0    5    16.0    6    36.0    5     7.6   10    75.3    5    23.8   24   161.0   24   186.2    1     3.0                 86   521.9  
UNION           8    14.0                 1     2.0    2     2.0                              1     1.0    3     6.0    3     8.0    7     8.0    1     1.0                 26    42.0  
WILLIAMSBURG    2     4.1                 2     5.1    5    21.7   13    32.7   13   100.7   24   166.8   12    76.6  103  2571.0   49   336.0    9    21.6    2     8.0   234  3344.3  
YORK            2     4.0                 1      .2                                           2     2.0    1     2.0    9    19.5    4     6.6    4     7.6    2     4.0    25    45.9  
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  
  T O T A L   252   943.3   27    18.8   68   109.9  130   309.2  122   516.3  176   619.8  346  1771.7  260   907.6  887 11952.7  581  3345.1  299  1019.2   56   217.1  3204 21730.7  

FOREST LAND FIRES BY COUNTY AND MONTH, FISCAL YEAR 97

                 JULY        AUGUST      SEPTEMBER     OCTOBER     NOVEMBER     DECEMBER      JANUARY     FEBRUARY       MARCH        APRIL         MAY         JUNE          TOTAL  
              NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES  NO.   ACRES   NO.   ACRES  
======================================================================================================================================================================================  
ABBEVILLE       5     7.5                              1      .1                              1     2.0                 1      .2   10    10.8    1     5.0                 19    25.6  
AIKEN           6     4.0    1     1.0    6    18.5    3     7.0    4     3.2    6    18.0    7    23.0    6    19.2   18    97.1   16   215.6   18    69.3    1      .1    92   476.0  
ALLENDALE                                              4      .8                 3     1.5    3     3.6    4     2.1    9    17.1    3     3.4                              26    28.5  
ANDERSON        4     7.0    1     1.0                 1     1.5    1      .5                              2     4.5    4    12.0    5    23.5    2    38.5                 20    88.5  
BAMBERG         1      .1                 4    13.0    7    16.4    4     6.7    1      .1    5    14.6    9    50.2   13    11.5    3    13.4    2    59.6                 49   185.6  
BARNWELL        4      .5    1     1.5                 3    13.5                              1     3.0    2      .5    1     2.1    4     5.0    1     1.0                 17    27.1  
BEAUFORT        4    31.0                                           1      .1    4    17.0   14    72.5    7    53.0   33   212.2   10    19.9    2    15.0                 75   420.7  
BERKELEY        7    18.7    4     2.1                 3     6.0    7    61.0   11    36.2   28   150.4   15    81.1   67  1146.0   45   446.6   22    94.8                209  2042.9  
CALHOUN         8     4.1                              2    17.0    1     1.5    1     3.0    3    11.5    5    11.0    6    33.0    2     5.0                 2     6.0    30    92.1  
CHARLESTON, L.  4     1.7                                                                     6    21.7    3     2.2   10    44.0    8    45.7    1      .1                 32   115.4  
CHARLESTON, U.  3    51.0                              1     2.0                 1    15.0    6     7.1    6    22.5   14   148.6   11   173.7                              42   419.9  
CHEROKEE        7    13.0                              2     2.0                              3     8.0    1     1.0    3     4.3    5    24.5    2     2.0                 23    54.8  
CHESTER         7    36.5                                                                                  3     3.7    4     9.0                 4     5.1                 18    54.3  
CHESTERFIELD    4    22.2                              2     3.0    1     1.0                 6    12.6    7    20.3   14   883.6   14    28.9   16    52.3    3     8.5    67  1032.4  
CLARENDON                    2     1.1    3     4.5    3     7.0    7    16.5    3    20.5   15    70.3    7    21.7   29    84.9   20    57.6    5    19.0                 94   303.1  
COLLETON       12    31.1    2      .6                 5    11.3    3     5.1   10    25.4   16    63.6    5    11.1   37   296.8   15   103.2   14    43.2    2      .3   121   591.7  
DARLINGTON      2     9.0    1      .2    1     2.0    2     5.0    2     7.0    1     3.0    2    17.0    1     1.0    9    26.0   13    42.9   11     9.7    3     7.5    48   130.3  
DILLON          3    17.3                              1     5.0    2      .6                 1     2.0    4    16.0    8    21.0   11    36.2    5    67.1    2     3.0    37   168.2  
DORCHESTER     11   187.4                 1      .2    3     8.0    3     3.8    9    26.1   16    61.7    8    23.9   30   395.1   20   108.4    2     8.5    1     2.0   104   825.1  
EDGEFIELD                                                           1     4.0    1      .2                 2     1.2    1      .3    1      .2                 3    13.0     9    18.9  
FAIRFIELD       9     5.6    2      .3    2      .3    3    16.1    1      .1    1      .1                 2     3.1    9     6.4    6     5.8    5    11.7                 40    49.5  
FLORENCE        4    39.2                              1     2.0    2    10.5    6     8.4    5     5.6    4     6.8   27   160.8   17    70.0   12    98.3    2      .5    80   402.1  
GEORGETOWN      1      .1                 1     1.5    2     7.0    3     4.2    5     7.0    3     5.1    5    18.0   30  3405.7   19   130.3    4    13.0                 73  3591.9  
GREENVILLE      3     4.0                              1     1.0    2     1.4    1     1.5    1     5.0    4     9.0    9    26.5    6    16.1    3    20.0    1     2.0    31    86.5  
GREENWOOD       1      .3    1      .5                 1      .5    5    50.0    1      .3    1      .2    1      .5    9    22.5    2     8.0    4     4.5                 26    87.3  
HAMPTON         5     2.6                 1      .1    2     5.1    1     2.0    4     4.1    5    28.5    3     6.5   20    78.9   17    41.5    4     6.6    1     2.0    63   177.9  
HORRY           3     6.2                              3     5.7    3    20.0    5     9.0   11    37.1    3     4.3   30   202.6   18    60.0   10    42.9    2     3.3    88   391.1  
JASPER          5    65.4                 3     4.2    5    35.8    1     8.0    5    14.0   12    47.4   15    25.1   53   423.8   21   103.0    3    16.4                123   743.1  
KERSHAW         7     4.4                              2     5.0    1     1.0                 7    16.0    4    21.5   13    54.0    8   495.5    8    39.5    4    15.5    54   652.4  
LANCASTER       8    17.9                                           1     1.0                 3    17.0                              2    11.0    4    14.0                 18    60.9  
LAURENS         1     1.0                                                                     1      .9                 2     2.5    2     1.0    4     8.0    1     1.0    11    14.4  
LEE             5   100.0                 1      .1    1     1.5    6    25.6    1     5.0    4    49.0    1    30.0   19   224.5   12    70.0    8     8.0    4    65.0    62   578.7  
LEXINGTON      25    19.6    2     1.8    4      .5   11     7.2    5     5.2   17    40.2   11    23.8   11    23.5   20    54.6   33    36.0   38    62.3    4      .7   181   275.4  
MARION          1      .1                                                                     1     2.0                 8    51.2    2     2.7    2      .7                 14    56.7  
MARLBORO        3     6.0                                           1      .1    4     4.1    2      .8    9    18.8   14    43.9    8    24.8    5     2.6    4    31.2    50   132.3  
MCCORMICK       2      .4                              1      .3    1      .3                              1     1.0    3     6.4    8    10.7    8     2.9                 24    22.0  
NEWBERRY        4     8.0    1      .4    2     1.0                              2      .3    2     4.0    1     1.0    3     6.0    3    14.5    3     7.3                 21    42.5  
OCONEE          1     1.0                 1      .1    1     1.0                              1     2.0    2     5.0    7    42.7    7    19.8    5     7.3                 25    78.9  
ORANGEBURG      9    31.5    4     1.4   12    31.2   12    22.0    3     4.1   11    62.7   29   433.8   10    33.2   54   358.7   18    85.2   10    23.7    1     1.0   173  1088.5  
PICKENS         1     1.5                              1      .5    2     5.2                 1     1.2                13    69.4    8    21.3   10    19.9                 36   119.0  
RICHLAND        2     8.0    1     5.0    1     2.0    2     5.0    2     3.5    2    20.0    5    25.0                 7    19.4    5    41.5    4    50.0                 31   179.4  
SALUDA          2      .2                 2     4.0                 3     8.1                              1     1.0                 3     3.2    1      .2    1     2.0    13    18.7  
SPARTANBURG     7    10.0                              2     3.0    4     6.5                 2     2.0    2     8.0    5    13.0    4    30.0    1     5.0    1     1.0    28    78.5  
SUMTER          4    10.0                 2     3.0    4    14.0    5    29.5    4     6.5    7    44.8    4     9.8   23   157.0   21   171.0    1     3.0                 75   448.6  
UNION           4     6.0                 1     2.0                                                                     1     4.0    1      .5                               7    12.5  
WILLIAMSBURG    1      .1                 2     5.1    5    21.7   12    24.7   11    96.7   23   162.8   12    76.6  103  2571.0   49   335.5    9    21.6    1     5.0   228  3320.8  
YORK            2     4.0                 1      .2                                           1     1.0                 7    13.5    3     6.1    4     7.6    2     4.0    20    36.4  
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  
  T O T A L   212   795.2   23    16.9   51    93.5  103   260.0  101   322.0  131   445.9  271  1459.6  192   648.9  800 11463.8  519  3179.5  278   987.2   46   174.6  2727 19847.1  

TOTAL ALL LAND FIRES BY COUNTY AND CLASS, FISCAL YEAR 97

 
                  CLASS A        CLASS B        CLASS C        CLASS D        CLASS E        CLASS F        CLASS G         TOTAL  
                NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES  
====================================================================================================================================  
ABBEVILLE         7     1.2     17    30.9                                                                                24    32.1  
AIKEN            15     2.4     92   222.7      8   140.0      1   185.0                                                 116   550.1  
ALLENDALE         7      .8     21    32.4                                                                                28    33.2  
ANDERSON                        21    45.1      5    92.0                                                                 26   137.1  
BAMBERG          22     2.6     30    83.5      5   108.6                                                                 57   194.7  
BARNWELL          8     1.2     20    44.5      2    44.1                                                                 30    89.8  
BEAUFORT          9     1.1     76   223.5     22   411.0                                                                107   635.6  
BERKELEY         26     2.8    144   376.0     38   786.0      2   290.0      1   588.7                                  211  2043.5  
CALHOUN           9     1.1     27    71.5      3    42.0                                                                 39   114.6  
CHARLESTON, L.   10     1.0     24    65.4      7    92.0                                                                 41   158.4 
CHARLESTON, U.    4      .4     24    56.5     14   365.0                                                                42    421.9 
CHEROKEE                        25    46.7      2    25.0                                                                 27    71.7  
CHESTER           2      .3     17    33.5      1    30.0                                                                 20    63.8  
CHESTERFIELD     21     3.0     61   130.5     13   313.0                     1   800.0                                   96  1246.5  
CLARENDON        24     2.9     68   203.8     15   227.0                                                                107   433.7  
COLLETON         46     5.1     96   240.7     23   462.0                                                                165   707.8  
DARLINGTON        5     1.0     45    99.0      4    59.0                                                                 54   159.0  
DILLON            8     1.1     28    64.0      6   142.0                                                                 42   207.1  
DORCHESTER       13     2.2     85   215.8     21   402.5      2   283.0                                                 121   903.5  
EDGEFIELD         5      .9      7    21.3      1    10.0                                                                 13    32.2  
FAIRFIELD        30     4.2     23    24.9      2    25.0                                                                 55    54.1  
FLORENCE         16     2.5     53   130.7     16   327.0                                                                 85   460.2  
GEORGETOWN        9     1.0     57   177.0      6   115.0      1   150.0                     1  3150.0                    74  3593.0  
GREENVILLE        7      .8     30    65.9      2    27.0                                                                 39    93.7  
GREENWOOD         3      .5     29    34.9      3    57.0                                                                 35    92.4  
HAMPTON          22     2.4     60   121.6      6    90.0                                                                 88   214.0  
HORRY             7     1.0     71   207.2     11   196.0                                                                 89   404.2  
JASPER           18     2.5     87   182.9     29   634.0                                                                134   819.4  
KERSHAW           5      .7     52    97.6      8   131.0      1   106.0      1   350.0                                   67   685.3  
LANCASTER         1      .1     15    40.8      2    20.0                                                                 18    60.9  
LAURENS           1      .2     19    25.0                                                                                20    25.2  
LEE               6      .9     45   113.5     20   530.0                                                                 71   644.4  
LEXINGTON        71     9.7    104   148.4      7   122.0                                                                182   280.1  
MARION            4      .6     11    23.4      2    35.0                                                                 17    59.0  
MARLBORO         14     1.8     45    92.5      5    88.0                                                                 64   182.3  
MCCORMICK        10     1.1     18    22.5                                                                                28    23.6  
NEWBERRY          3      .5     20    43.2                                                                                23    43.7  
OCONEE            4      .6     25    48.3      2    37.0                                                                 31    85.9  
ORANGEBURG       42     5.8    156   395.1     23   466.0                     1   350.0                                  222  1216.9  
PICKENS           5      .9     32    56.8      3   100.0                                                                 40   157.7  
RICHLAND                        28    79.5      7   147.0                                                                 35   226.5  
SALUDA           11     1.3      9    23.0      1    11.0                                                                 21    35.3  
SPARTANBURG                     28    57.5      1    25.0                                                                 29    82.5  
SUMTER            2      .3     67   190.6     17   331.0                                                                 86   521.9  
UNION                           26    42.0                                                                                26    42.0  
WILLIAMSBURG     28     3.0    129   439.3     72  2176.0      5   726.0                                                 234  3344.3  
YORK              3      .4     22    45.5                                                                                25    45.9  
====================================================================================================================================    
T O T A L       563    73.9   2189  5236.9    435  9441.2     12  1740.0      4  2088.7      1  3150.0                  3204 21730.7  

 
CLASS A <=.25; CLASS B .26-9.9; CLASS C 10-99; CLASS D 100-299; CLASS E 300-999; CLASS F 1000-4999; CLASS G > 5000  

FOREST LAND FIRES BY COUNTY AND CLASS, FISCAL YEAR 97

  
                  CLASS A        CLASS B        CLASS C        CLASS D        CLASS E        CLASS F        CLASS G         TOTAL  
                NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES    NO.   ACRES  
====================================================================================================================================  
ABBEVILLE         4      .7     15    24.9                                                                                19    25.6  
AIKEN            13     1.9     71   169.1      7   120.0      1   185.0                                                  92   476.0  
ALLENDALE         6      .6     20    27.9                                                                                26    28.5  
ANDERSON                        18    38.5      2    50.0                                                                 20    88.5  
BAMBERG          16     2.0     28    75.0      5   108.6                                                                 49   185.6  
BARNWELL          6      .9     11    26.2                                                                                17    27.1  
BEAUFORT          6      .7     52   139.0     17   281.0                                                                 75   420.7  
BERKELEY         25     2.7    143   375.5     38   786.0      2   290.0      1   588.7                                  209  2042.9  
CALHOUN           5      .6     23    61.5      2    30.0                                                                 30    92.1  
CHARLESTON, L.   10     1.0     17    57.4      5    57.0                                                                 32   115.4  
CHARLESTON, U.    4      .4     24    56.5     14   363.0                                                                 42   419.9  
CHEROKEE                        22    39.8      1    15.0                                                                 23    54.8  
CHESTER           2      .3     15    24.0      1    30.0                                                                 18    54.3  
CHESTERFIELD      7     1.2     55   111.2      4   120.0                     1   800.0                                   67  1032.4  
CLARENDON        19     2.4     65   191.7     10   109.0                                                                 94   303.1  
COLLETON         25     3.0     77   207.7     19   381.0                                                                121   591.7  
DARLINGTON        4      .8     42    97.5      2    32.0                                                                 48   130.3  
DILLON            6      .9     27    55.8      4   111.5                                                                 37   168.2  
DORCHESTER       10     1.8     77   214.8     15   325.5      2   283.0                                                 104   825.1  
EDGEFIELD         3      .6      5     8.3      1    10.0                                                                  9    18.9  
FAIRFIELD        18     2.7     20    21.8      2    25.0                                                                 40    49.5  
FLORENCE         15     2.4     52   122.7     13   277.0                                                                 80   402.1  
GEORGETOWN        8      .9     57   176.0      6   115.0      1   150.0                     1  3150.0                    73  3591.9  
GREENVILLE        1      .1     29    69.4      1    17.0                                                                 31    86.5  
GREENWOOD         1      .2     22    30.1      3    57.0                                                                 26    87.3  
HAMPTON          10     1.1     48    99.8      5    77.0                                                                 63   177.9  
HORRY             6      .9     73   216.2      9   174.0                                                                 88   391.1  
JASPER           15     2.0     83   181.1     25   560.0                                                                123   743.1  
KERSHAW           3      .6     42    84.8      7   111.0      1   106.0      1   350.0                                   54   652.4  
LANCASTER         1      .1     15    40.8      2    20.0                                                                 18    60.9  
LAURENS                         11    14.4                                                                                11    14.4  
LEE               2      .2     43   118.5     17   460.0                                                                 62   578.7  
LEXINGTON        70     9.5    104   143.9      7   122.0                                                                181   275.4  
MARION            2      .3     10    21.4      2    35.0                                                                 14    56.7  
MARLBORO         14     1.8     33    74.5      3    56.0                                                                 50   132.3  
MCCORMICK         6      .7     18    21.3                                                                                24    22.0  
NEWBERRY          2      .3     19    42.2                                                                                21    42.5  
OCONEE            4      .6     19    41.3      2    37.0                                                                 25    78.9  
ORANGEBURG       15     2.2    136   334.3     21   402.0                     1   350.0                                  173  1088.5  
PICKENS           4      .8     30    58.2      2    60.0                                                                 36   119.0  
RICHLAND                        25    68.4      6   111.0                                                                 31   179.4  
SALUDA            6      .7      7    18.0                                                                                13    18.7  
SPARTANBURG                     27    53.5      1    25.0                                                                 28    78.5  
SUMTER                          61   162.6     14   286.0                                                                 75   448.6  
UNION                            7    12.5                                                                                 7    12.5  
WILLIAMSBURG     28     3.0    123   415.8     72  2176.0      5   726.0                                                 228  3320.8  
YORK              3      .4     17    36.0                                                                                20    36.4  
====================================================================================================================================    
  T O T A L     405    54.0   1938  4681.8    367  8132.6     12  1740.0      4  2088.7      1  3150.0                  2727 19847.1  
  
CLASS A <=.25; CLASS B .26-9.9; CLASS C 10-99; CLASS D 100-299; CLASS E 300-999; CLASS F 1000-4999; CLASS G > 5000  

TOTAL ALL LAND FIRES BY COUNTY AND CAUSE, FISCAL YEAR 97

                                                                       DEBRIS                           EQUIPMENT  
                   LIGHTNING        CAMPFIRE          SMOKING          BURNING        INCENDIARY          U S E          RAILROAD         CHILDREN           MISC.          T O T A L  
COUNTY            NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES  
======================================================================================================================================================================================  
ABBEVILLE           1     4.0                         2     2.5       10     8.6        4     3.9        6    11.1                         1     2.0                        24    32.1  
AIKEN               3     8.3                         2     6.0       47   156.7       26   272.1       10    31.5                        18    55.7       10    19.8      116   550.1  
ALLENDALE                                             1      .1       10    17.3        9    13.8        4      .5        3     1.4        1      .1                        28    33.2  
ANDERSON                                              1     1.5       12    67.6        3    40.0        1     6.0                         3     7.0        6    15.0       26   137.1  
BAMBERG             1      .1                         3    12.2       26    92.8       22    86.0                                          5     3.6                        57   194.7  
BARNWELL                                                              13    14.1        5    17.6        6    20.3                         4     6.2        2    31.6       30    89.8  
BEAUFORT                                                              32    99.8       71   510.8                                          3    24.0        1     1.0      107   635.6  
BERKELEY            2     6.0        1     4.0        1      .5       56   534.7      138  1477.3        6    18.0                         6     2.5        1      .5      211  2043.5  
CALHOUN             1      .2                         1      .1       21    51.6        6    42.5        3    10.0                         3     3.1        4     7.1       39   114.6  
CHARLESTON, L.                                                        18    46.5       19    83.4        1      .5        2    27.0                         1     1.0       41   158.4  
CHARLESTON, U.                                                        11    40.7       29   378.2        2     3.0                                                          42   421.9  
CHEROKEE                                              6     9.1        8    18.6        5    21.0        1     1.0                         1     2.0        6    20.0       27    71.7  
CHESTER                                                                4     4.3       10    19.0        2     8.0                         2     1.5        2    31.0       20    63.8  
CHESTERFIELD        1    21.0                        12    64.8       37  1053.8       24    57.2        6    27.0        9    13.0        2      .7        5     9.0       96  1246.5  
CLARENDON                                                             37    96.2       67   324.2        2    13.2                         1      .1                       107   433.7  
COLLETON                                              2     1.1       78   325.0       66   354.2        7     4.5                         4     1.8        8    21.2      165   707.8  
DARLINGTON                                            1     1.0       23    75.2       22    61.2        3    15.7        1     3.0        2     2.5        2      .4       54   159.0  
DILLON                               2     1.1        1      .2       15    99.9       14    70.1        3    21.1                         2     7.0        5     7.7       42   207.1  
DORCHESTER          1     2.0                         1     2.0       45   220.0       62   501.2        6    15.1                         2     1.2        4   162.0      121   903.5  
EDGEFIELD           2    14.0                                          4     9.5        1      .2        1     5.0                         1      .2        4     3.3       13    32.2  
FAIRFIELD           1      .1                         4     2.0       15    29.9        6     6.7       21    13.0                         1      .2        7     2.2       55    54.1  
FLORENCE            1     3.0                                         32   157.7       48   244.2        1     3.0                         1      .3        2    52.0       85   460.2  
GEORGETOWN                                                            25  3275.2       43   309.4        6     8.4                                                          74  3593.0  
GREENVILLE                           1      .1        2     4.0       18    44.0       10    35.0                                          2     5.1        6     5.5       39    93.7  
GREENWOOD                            1    17.0        3     4.0       15    35.7        1      .3        2      .7                         5     4.8        8    29.9       35    92.4  
HAMPTON             3     8.1                                         37    78.2       35   119.1        8     6.8                         4     1.7        1      .1       88   214.0  
HORRY                                                                 35   134.5       43   238.9        1     1.0                         8    29.1        2      .7       89   404.2  
JASPER                                                1     2.0       41   196.4       77   537.0        8    73.6        1     4.0        2     1.1        4     5.3      134   819.4  
KERSHAW             3     5.0                         3     4.0       30   481.0       12    19.4        4    16.0        1   106.0        6     3.4        8    50.5       67   685.3  
LANCASTER                                             1    10.0        2     9.0                         1     4.0                         8    25.3        6    12.6       18    60.9  
LAURENS                                               1     2.0        5     5.0        6     8.0        1      .5        1      .2        5     8.5        1     1.0       20    25.2  
LEE                 4   130.0        1     2.0        1     5.0       18   148.8       40   334.2                                                           7    24.4       71   644.4  
LEXINGTON           2     5.4                         5     2.6       81   139.7       24    51.5       14    23.1                        35    13.3       21    44.5      182   280.1  
MARION                                                1     1.0        4     7.3       10    50.4                         2      .3                                         17    59.0  
MARLBORO                                              1      .2       11    46.0       46   129.9        2     3.0        1      .1        2     2.1        1     1.0       64   182.3  
MCCORMICK                                             2      .2        6     6.9        1      .1                        14    13.5                         5     2.9       28    23.6  
NEWBERRY                             1     4.0        1     1.0        7    19.5        1      .3        7     8.4                         5     7.5        1     3.0       23    43.7  
OCONEE              2    27.0                                         13    23.7        1      .1        1     1.0                                         14    34.1       31    85.9  
ORANGEBURG          4     4.6        1     2.0        4     8.5       93   370.6       69   677.1       32    76.7                        10    18.5        9    58.9      222  1216.9  
PICKENS                                               1     4.0       23   127.2                         9    16.5                         5     7.5        2     2.5       40   157.7  
RICHLAND                                              3     5.5        5    12.0       18   156.5        5    42.0        1     4.0        1     5.0        2     1.5       35   226.5  
SALUDA              2      .2                                          4     4.3        4     7.2        4    15.1                         3     2.3        4     6.2       21    35.3  
SPARTANBURG                                           2     5.0        8    13.0        5    13.0        2     8.0                         7    13.0        5    30.5       29    82.5  
SUMTER                                                3    15.6       39   189.0       35   266.3        1     2.5                         5    33.0        3    15.5       86   521.9  
UNION                                                 3     3.5        5     5.0        2     2.5        1     2.0        2     3.0        1     1.0       12    25.0       26    42.0  
WILLIAMSBURG                                          3    11.2       42   345.4      181  2955.6        6    17.1                         1    10.0        1     5.0      234  3344.3  
YORK                                                  1     1.0       14    22.4        2     3.5        1     3.5                         5    10.5        2     5.0       25    45.9  
======================================================================================================================================================================================  
  T O T A L        34   239.0        8    30.2       80   193.4     1135  8960.3     1323 10500.1      208   557.4       38   175.5      183   324.4      195   750.4     3204 21730.7  

FOREST LAND FIRES BY COUNTY AND CAUSE, FISCAL YEAR 97

                                              DEBRIS                           EQUIPMENT  
                   LIGHTNING        CAMPFIRE          SMOKING          BURNING        INCENDIARY          U S E          RAILROAD         CHILDREN           MISC.          T O T A L  
COUNTY            NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES      NO.   ACRES  
======================================================================================================================================================================================  
ABBEVILLE           1     4.0                         2     2.5       10     8.4        2     1.5        3     7.2                         1     2.0                        19    25.6  
AIKEN               3     8.3                                         37   116.1       23   263.4        6    17.9                        15    52.7        8    17.6       92   476.0  
ALLENDALE                                             1      .1       10    13.4        9    13.7        2      .2        3     1.0        1      .1                        26    28.5  
ANDERSON                                              1     1.5        9    29.5        3    39.5        1     3.0                         3     7.0        3     8.0       20    88.5  
BAMBERG             1      .1                         1    12.0       24    90.2       18    79.7                                          5     3.6                        49   185.6  
BARNWELL                                                               6     6.7        3     1.6        3    14.0                         3     3.2        2     1.6       17    27.1  
BEAUFORT                                                              22    62.7       51   351.0                                          1     6.0        1     1.0       75   420.7  
BERKELEY            2     6.0        1     4.0        1      .5       54   534.1      138  1477.3        6    18.0                         6     2.5        1      .5      209  2042.9  
CALHOUN             1      .2                         1      .1       15    37.7        6    42.5        2     4.0                         2      .6        3     7.0       30    92.1  
CHARLESTON, L.                                                        12    33.4       17    54.9                         2    27.0                         1      .1       32   115.4  
CHARLESTON, U.                                                        11    40.7       29   376.2        2     3.0                                                          42   419.9  
CHEROKEE                                              5     8.8        7    18.0        3     5.0        1     1.0                         1     2.0        6    20.0       23    54.8  
CHESTER                                                                3     1.3       10    18.5        1     2.0                         2     1.5        2    31.0       18    54.3  
CHESTERFIELD        1    15.0                        10    20.8       28   935.9       14    35.8        5    12.0        7    12.4        1      .2        1      .3       67  1032.4  
CLARENDON                                                             31    67.7       60   228.1        2     7.2                         1      .1                        94   303.1  
COLLETON                                              1     1.0       58   280.9       48   287.0        4     2.3                         3     1.3        7    19.2      121   591.7  
DARLINGTON                                            1     1.0       19    63.2       22    56.2        1     4.0        1     3.0        2     2.5        2      .4       48   130.3  
DILLON                               2     1.1        1      .2       14    77.1       13    59.6        2    21.0                         2     6.0        3     3.2       37   168.2  
DORCHESTER                                                            36   172.9       56   473.9        6    15.1                         2     1.2        4   162.0      104   825.1  
EDGEFIELD           1    10.0                                          4     4.7                         1     1.0                                          3     3.2        9    18.9  
FAIRFIELD           1      .1                         3     1.5       14    28.8        5     5.5       11    11.4                         1      .2        5     2.0       40    49.5  
FLORENCE            1     3.0                                         28   130.6       47   213.2        1     3.0                         1      .3        2    52.0       80   402.1  
GEORGETOWN                                                            24  3274.1       43   309.4        6     8.4                                                          73  3591.9  
GREENVILLE                                            2     4.0       13    42.0       10    31.0                                          2     5.1        4     4.4       31    86.5  
GREENWOOD                            1    17.0        3     4.0       15    35.7        1      .3        1      .5                         2     2.5        3    27.3       26    87.3  
HAMPTON             2     8.0                                         29    62.4       24    99.4        5     6.5                         3     1.6                        63   177.9  
HORRY                                                                 34   129.4       43   230.9        1     1.0                         8    29.1        2      .7       88   391.1  
JASPER                                                1     2.0       39   193.5       69   470.7        7    66.5        1     4.0        2     1.1        4     5.3      123   743.1  
KERSHAW             3     5.0                         2     3.0       24   453.7       11    18.2        3    15.0        1   106.0        4     2.3        6    49.2       54   652.4  
LANCASTER                                             1    10.0        2     9.0                         1     4.0                         8    25.3        6    12.6       18    60.9  
LAURENS                                               1     2.0        3     1.9        3     2.5                                          4     8.0                        11    14.4  
LEE                 4   130.0        1     2.0        1     5.0       15   115.6       35   302.0                                                           6    24.1       62   578.7  
LEXINGTON           2     5.4                         5     2.6       81   139.7       24    51.5       14    18.6                        35    13.3       20    44.3      181   275.4  
MARION                                                1     1.0        4     6.8        9    48.9                                                                           14    56.7  
MARLBORO                                              1      .2        8    29.2       37    99.7        1     1.0        1      .1        2     2.1                        50   132.3  
MCCORMICK                                             2      .2        6     6.9                                         11    12.2                         5     2.7       24    22.0  
NEWBERRY                             1     4.0        1     1.0        6    18.5        1      .3        6     8.2                         5     7.5        1     3.0       21    42.5  
OCONEE              2    27.0                                         11    20.2        1      .1        1     1.0                                         10    30.6       25    78.9  
ORANGEBURG          4     4.6        1     2.0        4     8.5       74   321.9       62   637.5       12    46.5                         8     9.8        8    57.7      173  1088.5  
PICKENS                                               1     4.0       22    92.0                         7    15.0                         5     7.5        1      .5       36   119.0  
RICHLAND                                              1     4.0        5    10.9       17   115.5        5    39.5        1     4.0        1     5.0        1      .5       31   179.4  
SALUDA              1      .1                                          1      .2        4     7.2        3     3.1                         2     2.1        2     6.0       13    18.7  
SPARTANBURG                                           2     5.0        8    13.0        5    12.0        2     8.0                         7    13.0        4    27.5       28    78.5  
SUMTER                                                1    11.0       32   160.3       34   253.3        1      .5                         4     8.0        3    15.5       75   448.6  
UNION                                                                                   1      .5        1     2.0                         1     1.0        4     9.0        7    12.5  
WILLIAMSBURG                                          2     3.2       39   333.9      181  2955.6        4    13.1                         1    10.0        1     5.0      228  3320.8  
YORK                                                                  12    19.9        2     3.5        1     3.5                         4     6.5        1     3.0       20    36.4  
======================================================================================================================================================================================  
  T O T A L        30   226.8        7    30.1       60   120.7      959  8244.7     1194  9734.1      142   409.2       28   169.7      161   253.8      146   658.0     2727 19847.1  

Property Loss Report, Fiscal Year 97
                          HOMES             OTHER STRUCT.           EQUIPMENT             VEHICLES               OTHER  
 COUNTY                NBR.    EST. VALUE    NBR.    EST. VALUE    NBR.    EST. VALUE    NBR.    EST. VALUE    NBR.    EST. VALUE  
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  
 ABBEVILLE                0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 AIKEN                    5       121,500       4        17,000       0             0       1         5,000       0             0  
 ALLENDALE                0             0       0             0       1       100,000       0             0       0             0  
 ANDERSON                 0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       2            70  
 BAMBERG                  2        10,500       0             0       0             0       0             0       1           100  
 BARNWELL                 0             0       1         2,200       1           800       0             0       1           500  
 BEAUFORT                 0             0       2        13,000       0             0       0             0       1           700  
 BERKELEY                 0             0       2        17,500       2        10,000       0             0       0             0  
 CALHOUN                  0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       1         2,000  
 CHARLESTON, LOWER        0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       1         1,500  
 CHARLESTON, UPPER        0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 CHEROKEE                 0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 CHESTER                  0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 CHESTERFIELD             1        20,000       4        12,700       2        50,300       1           700      40         1,200  
 CLARENDON                0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 COLLETON                 1         1,000       4         4,500       2           500       2         2,500       1            20  
 DARLINGTON               0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 DILLON                   0             0       1         5,000       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 DORCHESTER               1         5,000       0             0       4       400,000       1         4,000       0             0  
 EDGEFIELD                0             0       1           500       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 FAIRFIELD                0             0       0             0       1         1,000       0             0       1         1,000  
 FLORENCE                 0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 GEORGETOWN               0             0       1         4,000       1         3,000       2         3,000       0             0  
 GREENVILLE               0             0       0             0       1           500       1         2,000       1         2,500  
 GREENWOOD                0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0   
 HAMPTON                  1         1,000       0             0       3       100,200       0             0       0             0  
 HORRY                    2        16,000       3           900       0             0       1         4,000       0             0  
 JASPER                   1           800       2         2,000       1        50,000       0             0      56         1,850  
 KERSHAW                  0             0       0             0       1        10,000       0             0       0             0  
 LANCASTER                0             0       0             0       2        90,000       0             0       0             0  
 LAURENS                  0             0       0             0       1        75,000       0             0       0             0  
 LEE                      0             0       1           500       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 LEXINGTON                0             0       9        20,700       2        13,100       8        29,100       4         3,005  
 MCCORMICK                1         2,500       0             0       0             0       0             0       5           110  
 MARION                   0             0       0             0       0             0     350       175,000       0             0  
 MARLBORO                 1           900       0             0       0             0       0             0       3            75  
 NEWBERRY                 0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 OCONEE                   0             0       2        25,000       0             0       0             0     200         8,000  
 ORANGEBURG               2        10,000       2        15,000       1         8,000       3        10,000       0             0  
 PICKENS                  2        11,200       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 RICHLAND                 0             0       0             0       0             0       2        10,000       0             0   
 SALUDA                   0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0      30           600  
 SPARTANBURG              1        30,000       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 SUMTER                  10         1,000       2           600       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 UNION                    0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0       0             0  
 WILLIAMSBURG             1        20,000       2           500       1        20,000       0             0       0             0  
 YORK                     0             0       1           500       1            75       1           500       0             0  
==================================================================================================================================  
STATE TOTAL              32       251,400      44       142,100      28       932,475     373       245,800     348        23,230     

Table of Contents



INSECT AND DISEASE

The Insect and Disease Section in cooperation with the State Division of Plant Industry and the U.S. Forest Service maintains a program to detect, evaluate, and suppress forest pests. Through cooperative agreements, these agencies make their technical assistance and advice available to the Forestry Commission.

The current forest pest detection and reporting system involves the reporting by field foresters of forest pests that are causing abnormal losses, require control action, or which may present new problems. Aerial surveys are made periodically for specific pests to determine occurrence and the need for suppression action.

Major Insect Problems

Southern Pine Beetle

Southern pine beetle activity was at a low level in most of the state this year. Some spots were detected in Georgetown and Beaufort counties by mid-June. Surveys of the state in May and June detected 207 beetle spots containing 9,815 trees. This represented a volume loss of 556 cords and 292,600 board feet of pine with a value of $128,256. By the end of June beetle spots were being found in Richland, Fairfield, Lexington, Newberry, Chester, and Union counties. An operational 20% survey was planned for August.

Six of the original SPB outbreak counties were retained in the outbreak area. These were: Anderson, Oconee, Union, Greenville, Spartanburg and Jasper.

Pheromone trapping during the Spring of 1997 indicated a static to declining beetle population in most of the state. Only Richland County was predicted to have moderate to increasing activity.

Funding for beetle suppression came from the U.S. Forest Service and was sufficient to perform surveys and provide technical assistance. The state funds appropriated for cut and leave were carried forward in an emergency pest suppression account.

Major Disease Problems

Oak Wilt

Oak wilt disease has been identified in Barnwell, Chesterfield, Kershaw, Lancaster, Lee, and Richland counties. Except for the recent discovery in Barnwell County the disease appears to be static and causing losses only to low value oaks. Since there is potential for loss of valuable trees, including urban trees, periodic surveys are made to evaluate the spread.

Dutch Elm Disease

Dutch Elm disease has been confirmed in Aiken, Anderson, Cherokee, Chester, Chesterfield, Edgefield, Fairfield, Greenville, Greenwood, Kershaw, Lancaster, Laurens, Lexington, Marlboro, Newberry, Oconee, Pickens, Richland, Saluda, Spartanburg, and York counties. It is expected to gradually spread through the state because the primary agent of spread, the smaller European elm bark beetle, occurs statewide.

Dogwood Anthracnose

In 1988 a new anthracnose disease of dogwood was noted for the first time in South Carolina. This disease is caused by the fungus Discula destructiva. Symptoms include foliage blighting, canker formation and progressive deterioration. Infected trees usually are killed by the fungus in 2-3 years. At this time infected trees have been found in Anderson, Greenville, Laurens, Oconee, Pickens, and Spartanburg counties. As part of a southwide effort, the Forestry Commission has established 19 permanent plots in the counties known to harbor infections of the fungus. The dogwoods in those plots will be monitored periodically to determine the rate of spread of this potentially devastating disease.

Mycorrhizal Inoculation:

A project was continued at Creech Seed Orchard this year to inoculate containerized longleaf seedlings with the mycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius (P.t.). Funding was not available to operationally inoculate the seedling crop for this year. However, approximately 80,000 seedlings were inoculated by I&D with sprayed spores.

Miscellaneous Insect and Disease Checks

Commission foresters made approximately 991 field checks of insect and disease problems and made recommendations for prevention and control. Other inquiries were handled by telephone, mail, and personal contact.

Insect and Disease Laboratory

During Fiscal Year 96-97 the Insect and Disease Laboratory processed 69 samples. These were submitted for analysis by Commission employees and private individuals. Recommendations for control of various pests identified were given where needed.

Table of Contents


ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

The Environmental Management Section is responsible for the development and implementation of South Carolina Forestry Commission programs that are related to the environmental protection of forest and associated natural resources. Issues that are addressed include the protection of water quality, site productivity, and unique ecosystems.

BMP Manual

South Carolinaís Best Management Practices for Forestry was originally published in March of 1994. Copies are distributed to loggers, landowners, and foresters at BMP educational programs and upon individual request. In June 1997, a nine-member BMP committee was formed by the SC Forestry Commission to review the effectiveness of existing BMPs for braided stream systems.

BMP Implementation Monitoring

A baseline survey of compliance with site preparation BMPs was completed and published during the 1996-97 fiscal year. Up until this baseline survey, compliance with site preparation BMPs had not been measured. Overall compliance with site preparation BMPs was 86.4%. Three previous surveys have documented an improvement in BMP compliance for harvesting BMPs from 84% in 1991 to 90% in 1994. To update compliance with harvesting BMPs, the SC Forestry Commission initiated a new BMP compliance survey in the spring of 1997. 200 harvested sites were located and inspected throughout South Carolina by BMP Foresters. Data will be analyzed and the results published during the 1997-98 fiscal year.

BMP Education/Training Program

BMP education and training are key aspects of the Forestry Commissionís non-regulatory BMP program. Sixty-six BMP meetings were held during this fiscal year throughout the state for forest landowner groups, government agencies, and professional organizations. A total of 1,692 people attended these BMP meetings. Included in these meetings were 12 Timber Operations Professional (TOP) workshops, which reached 370 loggers and foresters.

Courtesy Exam Program

The SC Forestry Commission has a full-time BMP Forester in each of the three operating regions of South Carolina. These foresters offer courtesy BMP exams to landowners, consulting foresters, and timber buyers in order to recommend appropriate site-specific BMPs to follow while conducting forestry activities. The BMP Foresters completed 202 courtesy exams during the 1996-97 fiscal year. Of the 202 sites, 194 (96%) were completed in compliance with our recommended guidelines.

Memorandum of Understanding

The SC Forestry Commission signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control (SC DHEC) to clarify the roles of the two agencies in implementing the forestry nonpoint source management plan. The SC Forestry Commission will serve as the clearinghouse for citizen concerns, suggestions, and complaints for forestry-related activities on forestland.

Table of Contents


EQUIPMENT

The Equipment Section is responsible for development and implementation of statewide programs concerning use, design and maintenance of specialized forest fire control equipment.

This section is responsible for providing technical assistance and advice to district repair shops, developing specifications for fire suppression equipment and motor vehicle fleet, and arranging training for all field mechanics.

All regular and specialized fire control equipment is modified and processed for field use at the Commission's Central Repair Shop. The Central Repair Shop personnel make numerous repairs to Forestry Commission vehicles and equipment and manufactured fire control equipment. The following list is some of the major accomplishments performed by the Central Repair Shop.

-Serviced and maintained vehicles assigned to Columbia Office/Shop Complex
-Provided maintenance assistance to the Region Repair Shops
-Processed new motor vehicle equipment
-Various truck and equipment parts from cannibalized equipment were issued to field shop
-Reworked wheel fire plows
-Repainted five mechanic trucks
-Repainted two truck tractors
-Refurbished two lowboy trailers
-Built 300 seedling racks for nursery
-Built two sediment boxes for nursery packing shed
-Built a containerized seedling extractor for Creech Seed Orchard
-Built four V blades
-Built root rake for John Deere loader
-Reworked two seedling vans
-Regions, State Forests, Taylor Nursery, Neiderhof Seed Orchard and Central Repair Shops maintenance facilities were certified by the Division of Motor Vehicle Management.

Equipment Purchased

Coastal Region

-Four Crawler tractors JD450G (Aiken, Barnwell, Colleton, Dorchester Counties)
-One International Transport (Colleton County)
-Three International Truck Tractors (Aiken, Dorchester, and Barnwell Counties)
-Two Holden Lowbed Trailers (Aiken, Barnwell Counties)
-One Omni Tilt Tractor (Dorchester County).
-Five 1997 Ford Trucks (Barnwell, Calhoun, Beaufort, Colleton, And Berkeley Counties)
-One mechanic Truck
-One 1997 Blazer - Law Enforcement
-One Mechanic Utility Body

Pee Dee Region

-Four Crawler Tractor JD450G (Chesterfield, Marlboro, Georgetown, and Horry Counties)
-Two International Transports (Chesterfield and Horry Counties)
-Two International Truck Tractors (Marlboro and Georgetown Counties)
-One Holden Trailer Lowbed (Marlboro County)
-One Omni Trailer Tilt (Georgetown County)
-Five Lift Plows Fesco (Malboro, Chesterfield, Georgetown, Horry, and Williamsburg Counties)
-Two Reverse C Frames for Lift Plows (Georgetown and Horry Counties)
-Six 1977 Ford Trucks (Dillon, Marion, Horry, Florence, Georgetown, and Chesterfield Counties)
-Two Mechanic Truck w/ Utility Bodies
-One 1997 truck-For Regional Equipment supervisor

Piedmont Region

-Eight International Transports (Oconee, Fairfield, York, McCormick, Richland, Greenville, and Anderson Counties)
-Two International Truck Tractors (Cherokee, Spartanburg Counties)
-Two Trailers, Holden Lowbed (Cherokee and Spartanburg Counties)
-Four Ranger Trucks - Ford (Greenwood, Fairfield, Cherokee, and Union counties)
-One Ford Ranger (Newberry Shop)
-Two Ford Mechanic Trucks w/Utility Bodies (Newberry and Spartanburg Shops)
-One Ford Truck - Law Enforcement

The Central Shop, along with field personnel, initiated purchasing, fabricating, and organizing the building of truck bodies for the new equipment.

The Central Shop prepared and organized the fire suppression equipment for one auction held at its headquarters. The Forestry Commission netted $223,230.00 that was used to purchase like equipment.

The Pee Dee Region sold on sealed bids some trucks, tractors, and fire plows at the Florence and Kingstree locations in January 1997. The sales netted $46,646.82. A balance of $25,294.01 in the surplus equipment budget will be carried forward for FY 1997-98.

Received 1.8 million dollars in recurring funds to purchase fire control equipment. Balance of $7,016.97 that will be carried forward for FY 1997-98.

Training for Mechanics

-The three Regional Equipment Managers attended a class on the service and maintenance procedures of the Allison Transmission.
-Twenty-eight mechanics attended a one day class on general hydraulics.
-S.C. Tractor & Equipment visited the operators of the Dresser Tractors in Kingstree on operation.

Table of Contents


ADMINISTRATION

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

The Human Resource Management Section administers personnel management programs and policies for the Forestry Commission. Major program areas are coordination of TQM efforts, employee relations, classification and compensation, personnel and position records management, recruitment, employee benefits, affirmative action, and worker's compensation.

Workforce

The South Carolina Forestry Commission has a total of 492 authorized full time equivalent positions in 49 separate job classifications. Of these positions, 458 are funded by state appropriations.

Personnel Turnover

An analysis of employee turnover data reveals 41 employees left their jobs during the fiscal year. There were 43 employees hired.

Employee Injuries

Most Commission personnel work in positions having a higher than normal risk of injury. The safety program, through the leadership of the Training and Safety Section, is directed toward reducing this risk. There were 49 job related injuries reported during the fiscal year.

Financial Statement

REVENUES
State Appropriations

$19,043,066

Federal Grants

$2,707,011

Earmarked Funds
Hunting & Fishing License

41,225

Burning Assistance Fee

95,064

Fire Lane Fee

130,985

Timber Marking Fee

25,528

Training Conference - Registration Fee

5,160

User Fee - State Park & Forest

17,936

Miscellaneous Fee

2,300

Construction of Water Bars

9,125

Stand By for Prescribed Burning

8,865

Sale of Seedlings

1,124,721

Sale of Timber

2,386,791

Employee Violation Penalty

200

Other Penalties, Costs, Settlements

42,308

Rent - Residence

12,392

Rent - Farm Land

28,222

Rent - State Owned Property

7,090

Rent - Equipment

8,739

Contributions & Donations

389

Insurance Claims

20,664

Sale of Services

57,233

Sale of Publications

748

Forest Product Assessment

969,653

Sale of Assets

272,599

Total Earmarked

$5,267,937

Total Revenue

$27,018,013

EXPENDITURES
Transferred to General Fund

58,002

State

18,460,587

Federal

2,477,101

Earmarked

5,009,093

Total Expenditures

$26,004,782

EXCESS REVENUE O/(U) EXPENDITURES

$1,013,231

Excess revenue represents receipt of prior year FEMA receivables and carry forward funds.

State Appropriated revenue includes supplemental appropriations of $200,000 each for southern pine beetle and field trial area.

Expenditures include $744,783 for permanent improvement projects and $2,730,186 for equipment.

Table of Contents


PROCUREMENT

The Procurement Section is located within the Division of Administration. The section is responsible for all Commission procurements, either in a review function of field procurements or in the actual procurement process of equipment, supplies and services required by the Commission. Procurement activities include the training of Commission personnel involved in procurement, locating responsible vendors, establishing approved vendor files, advertising and soliciting for quotations, reviewing and awarding contracts. The section is the liaison for all procurement requirements handled by the State Procurement Office and conducts the review of bids received and makes the recommendation of award for the contracts.

The development of written specifications and performance requirements for the specialized forestry equipment and services (air patrol and nursery operations) is coordinated and reviewed prior to the actual procurement process. A procurement policy and procedures manual is maintained and distributed to personnel to inform them of the procurement procedures required by the S. C. Consolidated Procurement Code. The Commission has received and operates with increased procurement amount limits authorization as a result of audit performance reviews, procurement training received and given by this section and procurement certification levels of the section personnel.

The Minority Business Enterprise Utilization Program for the Commission is coordinated and the annual plan for the Commission is developed by this section.

All property (building and equipment), tort liability, fidelity (honesty bond), vehicle and aircraft insurance coverage, to include, the annual review and renewal along with changes (additions, deletions and changes in coverage) and the filing of claims for losses or damage are the responsibility of this section.

Establishment of fixed assets records for equipment procured is initiated upon procurement and then coordinated with the Accounting Section. Screening requests for Federal Excess Property acquired through the U.S. Forest Service by the Fire Management Section are reviewed for compliance and then authorized.

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SAFETY/ TRAINING

 

SUBJECT

REG. I

REG. II

REG. III

ST. FOR.

NURS./TI

HDQTS.

CPR/1st Aid

YES

YES

NO

YES

YES

YES

             

Bloodborne Pathogens

YES

YES

YES

YES

N/A

YES

             

Fire Ext.

YES

NO

NO

NO

YES

YES

             

Hazard Com.

YES

NO

NO

NO

YES

NO

             

Forklift

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

             

Defensive Driving

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

             

Commercial Drivers License

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

             

Personal Protective Equip.

YES

NO

NO

YES

YES

NO

             

Other Training by Region/Unit:

Region I: Emergency Response, Chainsaw Safety, Weather Spotters, Accident Review, Heat Stress, Red Flag-Code Red, Fleet Safety Policy

Region II: Chainsaw Safety, New Employee Orientation, Emergency Response, "Training for Trainers", Review of Carvers Bay & Sand Hills fires

Region III: Radio Communications, Mountain Fire Crew, Law Enforcement, B.M.P.s, Nursery/Tree Imp.

State Forests: Fire Shelter

Headquarters: Chainsaw Safety

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ECONOMIC AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

The South Carolina Forestry Commission maintains a strong program of forest product business development and recruiting as well as rural development assistance. The goal is to maximize the contributions the forest resource makes to the state.

Activities for the year include:

42 active business recruiting leads maintained and worked on an as-needed basis. 15 leads were initiated this year

25 requests for business development assistance processed

5 leads for forest products export trade assistance processed

341 leads generated for forest product trade

57 requests for miscellaneous assistance handled

56 requests for forest product directories

2 forest product related companies established in South Carolina this year had assistance from the South Carolina Forestry Commission

South Carolina business promotion activities were carried out at the International Woodworking & Furniture Supply Fair, National Particleboard Association/Particleboard - MDF Institute, Interzum 97 International Trade Fair, Panel & Engineered Wood Technological Exposition, and Forest Products Machinery & Equipment Exposition.

Other activities include:

  • participation in 2 pallet recycling programs
  • participation in development of South Carolina Export Consortium
  • participation in the Governorís Rural Summit
  • Conducted programs for trade delegations from Japan and Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
  • Conducted the Southeast Region Teachers Tour with Temperate Forest Foundation.

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INTERNAL AUDIT

In October 1996, an Internal Audit Department was established within the South Carolina Forestry Commission. The Internal Audit Department is an independent appraisal function that examines and evaluates the adequacy and effectiveness of Commission activities as a service to all levels of Management and the Commissioners. Emphasis is on auditing the agencyís activities, processes, systems, and operations to ascertain efficiency in quality services.

Initial resources were expended on acquiring knowledge of the agency and how it operates. For approximately three months the Internal Auditor visited with personnel from the various Divisions, Departments, Regional Offices, Areas Offices, and State Forests to acquire this knowledge. The Internal Auditor and Management felt that it was most important to establish a relationship with the personnel and understand the operation before ever beginning to audit.

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INFORMATION AND EDUCATION

The Information and Education Department is comprised of Information Services, Forest Management Information, Fire Information and Prevention, and Environmental Education including Harbison Environmental Education State Forest.

Information Services

Information Services produces audio-visual and print material for use by schools, Forestry Commission personnel, and the public in general, for both educational and training purposes.

Beginning in fiscal year 1995-96, Information Services worked with area foresters in the three regions to prepare two-year I&E strategic plans. Each plan stipulated three target audiences for forestry information and the most important messages we need to communicate to those audiences. Each plan also outlined what region personnel would do to implement the plan and described materials Information Services would produce to support these activities. The majority of the products described below support the I&E plans.

Major accomplishments:

  1. A multimedia, interactive CD-ROM explaining and demonstrating the concept and various practices of the Stewardship Forestry program was developed for the thirteen southeastern states using a grant from the USDA Forest Service. The program was produced with assistance from the University of South Carolinaís Department of Computer Science.
  2. A South Carolina Forestry Commission internet website was designed, developed, and implemented .
  3. A short video entitled Saluda to the Sea was produced and distributed to all region and area offices to be used in forestry education for general audiences.
  4. An Effective Communications Course (training in planning a presentation) was conducted for new foresters, rangers, and other professional personnel.
  5. A thirty second public service announcement for television on the subject of prescribed fire was produced and aired using a grant from the US Forest Service in South Carolina.
  6. Supplied all photos and assisted with layout of the Comptroller Generalís Office annual financial report for the state of South Carolina.
  7. Produced four wildland-urban interface exhibits for 3 regions and central office.
  8. Produced five Stewardship forestry exhibits for use with the new CD-ROM.
  9. Designed 1996 BMP site preparation monitoring publication.
  10. Designed and constructed five outdoor exhibits for Harbison State Forest (HSF).
  11. Designed and built sixty-nine outdoor signs for HSF.
  12. Designed and produced southern pine beetle fact sheet.
  13. Designed four brochures for HSF: viewing Harbison, mammal list, bird list and reptile/amphibian list.
  14. Designed and produced four-color flyer/poster to promote genetic best seedlings.
  15. Produced two historic forestry exhibits for Piedmont RC&D and the Aiken Museum.
  16. Completed interior fine carpentry and built outdoor furniture for Harbison Environmental Education center.
  17. Designed and built computer consoles and storage for headquarters personnel.
  18. Developed an area for storage and construction of forestry exhibits; insulated and air conditioned.

Forest Management Information

News Releases: 15
Media Interviews: 43

Instructor for statewide Envirothon.

Fire Information/Fire Prevention

Major accomplishments:

  1. Continued development of the Field Fire Information Office Program, including a 3-day Basic Information Officer course and two in-service training sessions;
  2. Produced seven fire information Officer bulletins;
  3. Developed public information guidelines for sensitive area prescribed burning;
  4. Compiled history of significant South Carolina wildfire events;
  5. Provided representation to S.C. Firemanís Association Education Committee;
  6. Produced twenty art/graphic pieces and three animation sequences to support Forestry Commission activities.

News Releases: 25
Media Interviews: 56
Exhibits: 2

Environmental Education

An Environmental Education Coordinatorís position was added during the fiscal year to plan, develop, and coordinate the Forestry Commissionís environmental education effort. The Coordinator oversees the development of Harbison State Forestís Environmental Education center and serves as State Coordinator of Project Learning Tree (PLT) which is an international environmental education program designed for students in pre-kindergarten through high school. Last year SC PLT conducted 37 educatorsí workshops throughout the state to train 756 teachers, and two facilitator workshops that trained 39 new facilitators. The Coordinator also represents the Commission on the Coalition for Natural Resource Education.

Harbison Environmental Education Forest

Harbison Environmental Education Forest, located within the city limits of Columbia, contains 2,177 acres. The tract is being managed as a public greenspace to emphasize environmental and forestry education and demonstrate forest management practices and as a forest recreational area. The forest is open seven days a week, with estimated annual attendance of 65,000 Ė 70,000.

Harbisonís educational staff and other SCFC employees conducted 53 educational programs serving over 2100 participants. The fall of the year seems to be the most popular time for activities. Twenty-eight programs occurred between July and December (thirteen in the month of October alone). Twenty-five were conducted between January and June. This spring activity is noteworthy considering the past history of little demand for programs at that time of year. A greater awareness of Harbisonís facilities has led to increased demand for programs for large groups. Twenty-five percent of the programs conducted for schools were for second graders from Harbison West Elementary, Heathwood Hall, John P. Thomas Elementary, and Irmo Elementary (529 students and adults). Most educational programs were directed toward the surrounding community, however, Pendleton Junior High School and a group of teachers from Georgetown County journeyed to Harbison to participate in outreach and teacher training programs.

Eighteen Scout programs were conducted. Girl Scouts held a jamboree at the forest. Two Boy Scout forestry merit badge courses were conducted. A Boy Scout camporee attracted over 420 scouts and leaders.

The Harbison Environmental Education Center was completed in April. The Center is a 5,000 square foot log building containing three offices, a small conference room, a screened porch, a deck, and a 100-seat conference room. During the three months after the Center opened, 697 people in 14 separate groups participated in environmental education activities.

A permit system for recreational users was initiated in February, 1997. Mountain bicyclists purchased 360 permits, netting $4884. Donations totaled $203. The forest contains over 15 miles of roads and trails for bicycling, hiking, and jogging.

A prefabricated restroom was installed at the Midlands Mountain Trail parking lot. A crew from Manchester State Forest provided much of the equipment and labor to complete this installation.

Three timber sales  were conducted on the forest. Two were advertised sales to selectively thin timber from 153 acres. One was a salvage sale to remove dead and dying trees. Total sold were 515,245 board feet of sawtimber and 209 cords of pulpwood for a total income of $198,083.

Note: Twenty-five percent (25%) of all forest receipts is paid to the county.

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